Coleman Hawkins – In a Mellow Tone {Prestige}[OJC]


Review from “cduniverse.com”
Few jazz giants have been as important and as relevant for as long as the Bean, a revealing nickname; it’s apparently a contraction of “the best and only.” Hawkins received this appellation during his tenure with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. The saxophonist’s gruff yet mellifluous, smoky yet coarse tone influenced generations of musicians.

This compilation features music from Hawkins’ years with Prestige Records. Filled with many exciting and tranquil moments, IN A MELLOW TONE captures a great period in the saxophonist’s forty-plus year career. The album’s opener, “You Blew Out the Flame In My Heart” displays Hawkins’ ability to swing with a light buoyant feel, while ballads such as “I Want to Be Loved,” “Greensleeves,” “Then I’ll be Tired of You,” and “Until the Real Thing Comes Along” show the degree of delicacy and intimacy of which Hawkins was capable. Finally, the album’s title track brims with energy and verve, due in large part to Gus Johnson’s crisp drumming.

Tracklist:
01 – You Blew Out the Flame in My Heart
02 – I Want to Be Loved
03 – In a Mellow Tone
04 – Greensleeves
05 – Through for the Night
06 – Until the Real Thing Comes Along
07 – The Sweetest Sounds
08 – Then I’ll Be Tired of You
09 – Jammin’ in Swingville

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis – tenor sax
Hilton Jefferson – alto sax
Jimmy Hamilton – clarinet
Vic Dickenson, J.C. Higginbotham – trombone
Joe Thomas, Charlie Shavers, Joe Newman – trumpet
Tommy Flanagan, Red Garland, Ray Bryant – piano
Kenny Burrell, Tiny Grimes – guitar
Wendell Marshall, Doug Watkins, Ron Carter, George Duvivier, Major Jolley – bass
Osie Johnson, Charles “Specs” Wright, Gus Johnson, Eddie Locke, Bill English – drums

Recorded between November 7, 1958 – March 30, 1962;
at Hackensack, NJ (#2, 4, 5 and 6); and Englewood Cliffs, NJ (#1, 3, 7, 8 and 9)

Label: Prestige – OJC
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream Jazz, Saxophone

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

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Hank Mobley – Jazz Message of Hank Mobley, Volume.1 {Savoy} ”mono”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Other than a Blue Note date from the previous year, this CD contains tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley’s first two sessions as a leader. With trumpeter Donald Byrd, either Hank Jones or Ronnie Ball on piano, Wendell Marshall or Doug Watkins on bass, drummer Kenny Clarke and (on three numbers) the unusual altoist John LaPorta, Mobley performs a mixture of originals and standards. The results (highlighted by “There’ll Never Be Another You,” “When I Fall in Love” and “Budo”) are a swinging hard bop date. Nothing all that unusual occurs and the CD clocks in at an average LP’s length but the swinging music is easily recommended to straight-ahead jazz fans and (unlike many of Denon’s Savoy reissues), these two sessions are brought back complete.

Tracks:
01 – There’ll Never Be Another You
02 – Cattin’
03 – Madeline
04 – When I Fall in Love
05 – Budo
06 – I Married an Angel
07 – The Jazz Message (with Freedom for All)

Personnel:
Donald Byrd – trumpet
Hank Mobley – tenor saxophone
John LaPorta – alto saxophone
Ronnie Ball, Horace Silver – piano
Doug Watkins, Wendell Marshall – bass
Kenny Clarke – drums

Recorded on February 8, 1956 and January 30, 1956.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Grant Green – Latin Bit {Blue Note}[RVG]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Grant Green, being known mainly as a soul-jazz guitarist, eventually gravitated into the popular boogaloo sound, a derivation of Latin music. The Latin Bit is the natural bridge to that next phase, though a bit premature for most in 1961-1963, even relative to the subsequent bossa nova craze. Pianist Johnny Acea, long an underrated jazzman, is the nucleus of this session, grounding it with witty chops, chordal comping, and rhythmic meat. The Latino rhythm section of drummer Willie Bobo and conga player Carlos “Patato” Valdes personify authentic, seasoned spice, while at times the chekere sound of Garvin Masseaux makes the soup too thick. At its collective best, the group presents a steady, serene, and steamy “Besame Mucho” and the patient, slow, slinky, sultry “Tico Tico.” Just a small step below is a classy take on Charlie Parker’s “My Little Suede Shoes,” a premier jazz bebop (emphasis) tune with a Latin undertow and Green’s tiniest staccato phrases, slightly marred by the overbearing constant chekere, but still classic. “Mambo Inn” is played inaccurately, but forgivable. “Mama Inez” ranks high for its calypso-infused happy feeling and wry stop-start lines. The straight-ahead hard bopper “Brazil” and lone soul-jazz tune, “Blues for Juanita,” display the single-note acumen that made Green’s style instantly recognizable. Tacked on the end are two selections with pianist Sonny Clark and tenor saxophonist Ike Quebec. While Clark is not known for Latin or soul-jazz, he’s quite good, while Quebec, who emphasized Brazilian rhythms in the last years of his life, plays hip secondary harmonies on the bossa nova-flavored “Granada,” but is in the complete background and a non-factor on the pop tune “Hey There.” This CD always yielded mixed results for staunch fans of Green, but a revisit shows it to be a credible effort, even if slightly flawed in part.

Tracks:
01 – Mambo Inn
02 – Besame Mucho
03 – Mama Inez
04 – Brazil
05 – Tico Tico
06 – My Little Suede Shoes
07 – Blues for Juanita
08 – Grenada
09 – Hey There

Personnel:
Grant Green – guitar
Ike Quebec – tenor sax (#8 & 9)
Johnny Acea (#1-7), Sonny Clark (#8 & 9) – piano
Wendell Marshall – bass
Willie Bobo – drums
Carlos “Patato” Valdes – congas
Garvin Masseaux – chekere (#1-6)

Recorded on April 26 (#1-7) and September 7 (#8 & 9), 1961
at the Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Gene Ammons – Late Hour Special {Fantasy} “Russian Print”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Originally released by Prestige while tenor saxophonist Gene Ammons was serving a long prison sentence for possession of drugs (the label effectively kept Ammons’ name alive by regularly coming out with “new” material), this album was reissued on CD in 1997. The distinctive tenor is heard on three numbers with a quartet/quintet also including pianist Patti Bown, bassist George Duvivier, drummer Walter Perkins, and sometimes Ray Barretto on conga, and on four cuts as part of a ten-piece group arranged by Oliver Nelson. Flugelhornist Clark Terry gets a couple of choruses on “Things Ain’t What They Used to Be,” and Bown has several solos, but Ammons is the main star throughout. In addition to performing his own “Lascivious” (a blues), he sticks to standards, infusing each tune with soul and swing. A fine outing, although with brief (35 & 1/2 minutes) playing time.

Tracks:
01 – The Party’s Over
02 – I Want to Be Loved (But by Only You)
03 – Things Ain’t What They Used to Be
04 – Lascivious
05 – Makin’ Whoopee
06 – Soft Winds
07 – Lullaby of the Leaves

Personnel:
Gene Ammons – tenor saxophone
George Barrow, Red Holloway – tenor saxophone
Oliver Nelson – alto saxophone, arranger & conductor
Bob Ashton – baritone saxophone
Clark Terry, Hobart Dotson – trumpet
Patti Bown, Richard Wyands – piano
George Duvivier, Wendell Marshall – bass
Walter Perkins, Bill English – drums
Ray Barretto – conga

Recorded in Englewood Cliffs, NJ; on June 13, 1961 and April 13, 1962.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Ike Quebec – Bossa Nova, Soul Samba {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Scott Yanow & Thom Jurek (allmusic.com)

This was veteran tenor saxophonist Ike Quebec’s final recording as a leader. It was cut in October 1962 and produced by Alfred Lion a little more than three months before the saxophonist’s death. Bossa Nova Soul Samba was recorded and released during the bossa nova craze, as Brazilian music was first brought to the attention of pop listeners via Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd’s smash hit with Tom Jobim’s “Desafinado,” on their Jazz Samba record for Verve in February. After that, seemingly everyone was making a bossa nova record. Quebec’s effort is a bit unusual in that none of the musicians (guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist Wendell Marshall, drummer Willie Bobo, and percussionist Garvin Masseaux) was associated with Brazilian (as opposed to Afro-Cuban) jazz before this, and that there isn’t a single tune written by Jobim on the set. Quebec emphasizes warm, long tones (reminiscent of Coleman Hawkins in a romantic fashion), and his sidemen play light and appealing but nonetheless authoritative bossa rhythms. Standout tracks here include Burrell’s own “Loie,” which opens the disc, “Goin’ Home,” based on a tune by classical composer Antonin Dvor├ík and arranged by Quebec — he does the same with “Liebestraum” two tunes later — and the stunning “Favela,” by the crack composing team of Joraci Camargo and Heckel Tavares. The result is high-quality melodic Brazilian dance music with Burrell shining in particular. The pleasing program concludes with three previously unissued alternate takes on the numerous CD reissues by Blue Note.

Tracks:
01 – Loie
02 – Lloro tu Despedida
03 – Goin’ Home
04 – Me’n You
05 – Liebestraum
06 – Shu Shu
07 – Blue Samba
08 – Favela
09 – Linda Flor
10 – Loie (alternate)
11 – Shu Shu (alternate)
12 – Favela (alternate)

Personnel:
Ike Quebec – tenor sax
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Wendell Marshall – bass
Willie Bobo – drums
Garvin Masseaux – chekere

Originally released in 1962

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork