Stan Getz – Bossas and Ballads: The Lost Sessions {Verve}


Review by Thom Jurek ~allmusic.com
First off, these “Lost Sessions” were never actually lost. The music here was supposed to be released as the Stan Getz Quartet’s first issue on A&M, and for the usual record company reasons, it was shelved instead. The tapes were in the vault and catalogs, so it’s not like they were found in someone’s closet. The bottom line is that Getz, already ill at this point, still had the goods. Produced by Herb Alpert (a genius in his own right even if his records don’t always hold up), the bossas here are tough, innovative jazz tunes mainly written by Getz’s pianist, Kenny Barron. Don’t look for the gentle side of Getz that was so beautifully displayed on his early bossa records with Charlie Byrd and Antonio Carlos Jobim. Instead, this is the man who had reinvented his playing technique. With a strong foil in Barron, Getz was free to explore his form of melodic improvisation to a fuller and wider extent, which is evident if you simply check out his solos on Barron’s “Sunshower” and “El Sueno,” and Mal Waldron’s classic ballad “Soul Eyes.” Interestingly, this was Barron’s date as much as it was Getz’s. His compositions and musical direction are key here, and he was trying to get deeper into and stretch the samba groove in his writing. Finding Getz in such an adventurous space in his playing allowed for this. With a rhythm section that includes bassist George Mraz and drummer Victor Lewis, this disc is essential not only for fans of Getz and Barron, but for real jazzheads.

Tracklist:
01. Sunshower (7:21)
02. Yours and Mine (8:01)
03. Joanne Julia (7:51)
04. Soul Eyes (7:24)
05. Spiral (7:55)
06. Beatrice (8:15)
07. The Wind (8:57)
08. El Sueno (6:37)
09. Feijoada (6:24)

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor saxophone
Kenny Barron – piano
George Mraz – bass
Victor Lewis – drums

Recorded & mixed by Al Schmitt
Mastered by Doug sax and Robert Hadley
Produced by Herb Alpert

Recorded March 1989 at A&M Recording Studios, Hollywood: track 6 on March 26;
tracks 1, 3-5 and 7 on March 28; tracks 2,8 and 9 on March 29

Genre: Jazz
Style: Hard Bop, Latin Jazz, Bossa Nova
Label: Verve
Year: 2003
Time: 68:44

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + artwork (full, except “tray”)
Quality-2: mp3@320 + artwork (full, except “tray”)

Stan Getz Quartet – Pure Getz {Concord}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Stan Getz’s 1982 band featured the harmonically advanced pianist Jim McNeely, bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Victor Lewis; Billy Hart fills in for Lewis on three numbers. This date sticks (with one exception) to high-quality jazz standards, some of which (“Sippin at Bell’s”) are not performed all that often. Getz is particularly swinging on “Tempus Fugit” and quite lyrical on Billy Strayhorn’s “Blood Count.”

Tracks:
01 – On the Up and Up
02 – Blood Count
03 – Very Early
04 – Sippin at Bell’s
05 – I Wish I Knew
06 – Come Rain or Come Shine
07 – Tempus Fugit

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor saxophone
James McNeely – piano
Victor Lewis, Billy Hart – drums

Recorded at Coast Recorders, San Francisco, California, January 1982;
and Soundmixers, New York, N.Y., February 1982.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Stan Getz Quartet – The Dolphin {Concord}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Stan Getz’s first recording for Concord finds him returning to the strictly acoustic straightahead format, performing six standards with a quartet comprised of pianist Lou Levy, bassist Monty Budwig and drummer Victor Lewis. Getz is in particularly fine form on the title cut, “Joy Spring” and “The Night Has a Thousand Eyes.”

Tracks:
01 – The Dolphin
02 – A Time for Love
03 – Joy Spring
04 – My Old Flame
05 – The Night Has a Thousand Eyes
06 – Close Enough for Love (Theme from “Agatha”)

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor saxophone
Lou Levy – piano
Monty Budwig – bass
Victor Lewis – drums

Recorded live at Keystone Corner, San Francisco, California; May 1981

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork