Stan Getz – Bossas and Ballads: The Lost Sessions {Verve}


Review by Thom Jurek ~allmusic.com
First off, these “Lost Sessions” were never actually lost. The music here was supposed to be released as the Stan Getz Quartet’s first issue on A&M, and for the usual record company reasons, it was shelved instead. The tapes were in the vault and catalogs, so it’s not like they were found in someone’s closet. The bottom line is that Getz, already ill at this point, still had the goods. Produced by Herb Alpert (a genius in his own right even if his records don’t always hold up), the bossas here are tough, innovative jazz tunes mainly written by Getz’s pianist, Kenny Barron. Don’t look for the gentle side of Getz that was so beautifully displayed on his early bossa records with Charlie Byrd and Antonio Carlos Jobim. Instead, this is the man who had reinvented his playing technique. With a strong foil in Barron, Getz was free to explore his form of melodic improvisation to a fuller and wider extent, which is evident if you simply check out his solos on Barron’s “Sunshower” and “El Sueno,” and Mal Waldron’s classic ballad “Soul Eyes.” Interestingly, this was Barron’s date as much as it was Getz’s. His compositions and musical direction are key here, and he was trying to get deeper into and stretch the samba groove in his writing. Finding Getz in such an adventurous space in his playing allowed for this. With a rhythm section that includes bassist George Mraz and drummer Victor Lewis, this disc is essential not only for fans of Getz and Barron, but for real jazzheads.

Tracklist:
01. Sunshower (7:21)
02. Yours and Mine (8:01)
03. Joanne Julia (7:51)
04. Soul Eyes (7:24)
05. Spiral (7:55)
06. Beatrice (8:15)
07. The Wind (8:57)
08. El Sueno (6:37)
09. Feijoada (6:24)

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor saxophone
Kenny Barron – piano
George Mraz – bass
Victor Lewis – drums

Recorded & mixed by Al Schmitt
Mastered by Doug sax and Robert Hadley
Produced by Herb Alpert

Recorded March 1989 at A&M Recording Studios, Hollywood: track 6 on March 26;
tracks 1, 3-5 and 7 on March 28; tracks 2,8 and 9 on March 29

Genre: Jazz
Style: Hard Bop, Latin Jazz, Bossa Nova
Label: Verve
Year: 2003
Time: 68:44

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + artwork (full, except “tray”)
Quality-2: mp3@320 + artwork (full, except “tray”)

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Astrud Gilberto – Compact Jazz {Verve}


Review by Stephen Cook (allmusic.com)
For listeners new to Gilberto’s classic Verve work, this edition of the label’s Compact Jazz sampler series makes for a perfect introduction. Along with Verve’s equally fine Silver Collection of Gilberto’s prime sides, this 16-track set includes cuts from most of the singer’s different projects. From her classic Getz date (“The Girl From Ipanema”) to her solo sessions with both Gil Evans (“Berimbau”) and Ron Carter and Toots Thielemans (“Beach Samba”), the music is always top-notch. A disc that will please both your bossa nova- and jazz-loving friends at that next Carnaval party.

Tracklist:
01. The Girl from Ipanema (05:15)
02. Agua de Beber (02:21)
03. Once I Loved (02:14)
04. Goodbye Sadness (Tristeza) (03:26)
05. Meditation (02:42)
06. Berimbau (02:26)
07. It Might As Well Be Spring (04:24)
08. O Morro (Nao Tem Vez) (02:59)
09. Summer Samba (So Nice) (02:39)
10. Corcovado (Quiet Nights) (04:15)
11. Dindi (02:44)
12. Take Me to Aruanda (02:29)
13. Felicidade (02:47)
14. Only Trust Your Heart (04:26)
15. Beach Samba (02:49)
16. How Insensitive (02:48)

Personnel:
Astrud Gilberto – vocals
featuring:
Stan Getz, Joao Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Gil Evans and Walter Wanderley

Compilation produced 1987

Label: Verve
Year: 1990
Genre: Jazz
Style: Vocal Jazz, Bossa Nova
Total Time: 50:43

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Stan Getz Quartet – Pure Getz {Concord}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Stan Getz’s 1982 band featured the harmonically advanced pianist Jim McNeely, bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Victor Lewis; Billy Hart fills in for Lewis on three numbers. This date sticks (with one exception) to high-quality jazz standards, some of which (“Sippin at Bell’s”) are not performed all that often. Getz is particularly swinging on “Tempus Fugit” and quite lyrical on Billy Strayhorn’s “Blood Count.”

Tracks:
01 – On the Up and Up
02 – Blood Count
03 – Very Early
04 – Sippin at Bell’s
05 – I Wish I Knew
06 – Come Rain or Come Shine
07 – Tempus Fugit

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor saxophone
James McNeely – piano
Victor Lewis, Billy Hart – drums

Recorded at Coast Recorders, San Francisco, California, January 1982;
and Soundmixers, New York, N.Y., February 1982.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Stan Getz Quartet – The Dolphin {Concord}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Stan Getz’s first recording for Concord finds him returning to the strictly acoustic straightahead format, performing six standards with a quartet comprised of pianist Lou Levy, bassist Monty Budwig and drummer Victor Lewis. Getz is in particularly fine form on the title cut, “Joy Spring” and “The Night Has a Thousand Eyes.”

Tracks:
01 – The Dolphin
02 – A Time for Love
03 – Joy Spring
04 – My Old Flame
05 – The Night Has a Thousand Eyes
06 – Close Enough for Love (Theme from “Agatha”)

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor saxophone
Lou Levy – piano
Monty Budwig – bass
Victor Lewis – drums

Recorded live at Keystone Corner, San Francisco, California; May 1981

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Stan Getz with Cal Tjader {Fantasy}[xrcd]


Review by Richard S. Ginell (allmusic.com)

An amazing ad-hoc session, thrown together in a San Francisco studio with now legendary personnel from two different groups. The lineup says it all — a meeting of the Latin jazz maestro and the future champion of Brazilian jazz, plus, from Tjader’s group, Vince Guaraldi on piano and guitarist Eddie Duran, and from Getz’s band, the then unknown teenager Scott LaFaro on bass and Billy Higgins on drums. A moment for the history books is an 11-minute workout on Guaraldi’s pentatonic souvenir of Tokyo, “Ginza Samba,” where the fast-samba theme finds Getz blowing to a Brazilian rhythm four years before “Desafinado.” The jamming, though, is in a straight-ahead bebop groove where Getz’s eloquence unfolds with almost unearthly ease. The rest of the album alternates between lyric ballads and solid, though non-Latin, swinging where Tjader, Guaraldi, and Duran graft onto the great Getz rhythm section like they’ve been playing together for decades (check out the funky combustion on “Crow’s Nest”). Collectors’ note: when Getz became a bossa nova star, this album was reissued in 1963 as Stan Getz With Cal Tjader with a different set of liner notes and remains available on LP and cassette in this form.

Tracks:
01 – Ginza Samba
02 – I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face
03 – For All We Know
04 – Crow’s Nest
05 – Liz-Anne
06 – Big Bear
07 – My Buddy

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor saxophone
Cal Tjader – vibes
Vince Guaraldi – piano
Eddie Duran – guitar
Scott LaFaro – bass
Billy Higgins – drums

Recorded at Circle Record Studios, San Francisco; February 8, 1958.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Stan Getz Quartet feat. Astrud Gilberto – Getz Au Go Go {Verve} “Originals”


Review by Lindsay Planer (allmusic.com)
Although the name Stan Getz (tenor sax) was initially synonymous with the West Coast cool scene during the mid-to-late 1950s, he likewise became a key component in the Bossa Nova craze of the early 1960s. Along with Astrud Gilberto (vocals), Getz scored a genre-defining hit with the “Girl From Ipanema,” extracted from the equally lauded Getz/Gilberto (1963). While that platter primarily consists of duets between Getz and João Gilberto (guitar/vocals), it was truly serendipity that teamed Getz with João’s wife Astrud, who claims to have never sung a note outside of her own home prior to the session that launched her career. Getz Au Go Go Featuring Astrud Gilberto (1964) was the second-to-last album that he would issue during his self-proclaimed “Bossa Nova Era” — the final being Getz/Gilberto #2 [live] (1964) concert title from Carnegie Hall. In many ways, that is a logical successor to this one, as both include the “New Stan Getz Quartet.” The band features a young Gary Burton (vibraphone), Kenny Burrell (guitar), Gene Cherico (bass), and Joe Hunt (drums). As is typical with jazz, there are a few personnel substitutions, with Helcio Milito (drums) and Chuck Israels (bass), respectively, filling in on nearly half the effort. As the name of the disc intimates, this recording hails from the venerable Greenwich Village venue, the Café Au Go Go, in mid-August of 1964 — two months after “Girl From Ipanema” became a Top Five pop single. However, the focus of Getz Au Go Go steers away from the Brazilian flavored fare, bringing Astrud Gilberto into the realm of a decidedly more North American style. That said, there are a few Antonio Carlos Jobim compositions — “Corcovado (Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars)” and “One Note Samba” — both of which would be considered as jazz standards in years to follow — as well as the lesser-circulated “Eu E Voce.” Getz and crew gather behind Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein’s “It Might as Well Be Spring,” and the scintillating instrumental “Summertime,” from Porgy & Bess. Other equally engaging cuts include affective vocal readings of “Only Trust Your Heart,” and the diminutive, yet catchy “Telephone Song.” There is also some great interaction between Getz and Burton on “Here’s to That Rainy Day.” Getz Au Go Go is highly recommended for all dimensions of jazz enthusiasts.

Tracklist:
01 – Corcovado (Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars) 02:52
02 – It Might as Well Be Spring 04:28
03 – Eu E Voce (Me and You) 02:33
04 – Summertime 08:12
05 – 6-Nix-Pix-Flix 01:06
06 – Only Trust Your Heart 04:42
07 – The Singing Song 03:47
08 – The Telephone Song 01:58
09 – One Note Samba 03:20
10 – Here’s That Rainy Day 06:16

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor sax and leader
Astrud Gilberto – vocalist
Gary Burton – vibes
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Gene Cherico, Chuck Israels – bass
Joe Hunt, Helcio Milito – drums

Tracks 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 recorded at Cafe Au Go Go, Greenwich Village, N.Y.C.; May 22, 1964
Tracks 1, 2, 3, 8 recorded at Carnegie Hall, N.Y.C.; October 9, 1964

Label: Verve
Year: 2007
Genre: Jazz
Style: Bossa Nova, Cool
Total Time: 39:13

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork