Coleman Hawkins – In a Mellow Tone {Prestige}[OJC]


Review from “cduniverse.com”
Few jazz giants have been as important and as relevant for as long as the Bean, a revealing nickname; it’s apparently a contraction of “the best and only.” Hawkins received this appellation during his tenure with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. The saxophonist’s gruff yet mellifluous, smoky yet coarse tone influenced generations of musicians.

This compilation features music from Hawkins’ years with Prestige Records. Filled with many exciting and tranquil moments, IN A MELLOW TONE captures a great period in the saxophonist’s forty-plus year career. The album’s opener, “You Blew Out the Flame In My Heart” displays Hawkins’ ability to swing with a light buoyant feel, while ballads such as “I Want to Be Loved,” “Greensleeves,” “Then I’ll be Tired of You,” and “Until the Real Thing Comes Along” show the degree of delicacy and intimacy of which Hawkins was capable. Finally, the album’s title track brims with energy and verve, due in large part to Gus Johnson’s crisp drumming.

Tracklist:
01 – You Blew Out the Flame in My Heart
02 – I Want to Be Loved
03 – In a Mellow Tone
04 – Greensleeves
05 – Through for the Night
06 – Until the Real Thing Comes Along
07 – The Sweetest Sounds
08 – Then I’ll Be Tired of You
09 – Jammin’ in Swingville

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis – tenor sax
Hilton Jefferson – alto sax
Jimmy Hamilton – clarinet
Vic Dickenson, J.C. Higginbotham – trombone
Joe Thomas, Charlie Shavers, Joe Newman – trumpet
Tommy Flanagan, Red Garland, Ray Bryant – piano
Kenny Burrell, Tiny Grimes – guitar
Wendell Marshall, Doug Watkins, Ron Carter, George Duvivier, Major Jolley – bass
Osie Johnson, Charles “Specs” Wright, Gus Johnson, Eddie Locke, Bill English – drums

Recorded between November 7, 1958 – March 30, 1962;
at Hackensack, NJ (#2, 4, 5 and 6); and Englewood Cliffs, NJ (#1, 3, 7, 8 and 9)

Label: Prestige – OJC
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream Jazz, Saxophone

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

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Bill Evans with Philly Joe Jones – Green Dolphin Street {Riverside}[xrcd]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This obscure Bill Evans trio set (with bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Philly Joe Jones) went unissued until the mid-’70s when the pianist decided that it was worth releasing as a fine example of bassist Chambers’ work. Very much a spontaneous set (recorded after the rhythm section made part of a record accompanying trumpeter Chet Baker), the group runs through a few standards such as “You and the Night and the Music,” “Green Dolphin Street,” and two versions of “Woody ‘N You.” Although lacking the magic of Evans’ regular bands, this CD reissue has its strong moments and the pianist’s fans will be interested in getting the early sampling of his work. A special bonus is the rare first take of “All of You” from the legendary Village Vanguard engagement by the 1961 Evans Trio (with bassist Scott LaFaro and drummer Paul Motian).

Tracks:
01 – You and the Night and the Music
02 – My Heart Stood Still
03 – Green Dolphin Street
04 – How am I to Know?
05 – Woody’n You (take 1)
06 – Woody’n You (take 2)
07 – Loose Bloose

Personnel:
Bill Evans – piano
Zoot Sims – tenor sax
Jim Hall – guitar
Paul Chambers, Ron Carter – bass
Philly Joe Jones – drums

Recorded at Reeves Sound Studios, New York City; January 19, 1959 (tracks: 1-6)
Recorded at Nola Penthouse Sound Studios, New York City; August 21, 1962 (track: 7)
Style: Cool, Post-Bop, Mainstream Jazz – Year: 1999

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans

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Art Pepper – New York Album {Analogue Productions}


Review by Andrew Bartlett (amazon.com)
After prison, after first shocking, then disappointing, and perhaps ultimately (and grimly) amusing the jazz world with enough dope-related hijinks to fill a book (as in Straight Life), alto saxist Art Pepper made a triumphant mid-1970s comeback. This 1979 session is rich with the fruits of Pepper’s return, a depth of playing that shows itself constantly throughout the New York Album’s five tunes. Pepper, as his widow, Laurie, notes in the liners, was always best when out to prove himself. Here, he’s out to show pianist Hank Jones, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Al Foster that he’s still a force to reckon with. “A Night in Tunisia” is fascinating, if a trifle straightly read, as is “Straight, No Chaser.” The best bits here, though, are Pepper’s yearning solo rendition of “Lover Man,” the piano-bass duo on “Duo Blues,” and the blazing, off-time take on “My Friend John,” one of the leader’s funkiest charts ever. This reissue of New York is additionally bolstered by terrific audiophile sound, the hallmark of Analogue Productions’ work in the jazz world.

Tracks:
01 – A Night in Tunisia
02 – Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be)
03 – Straight, No Chaser (alternate take)
04 – Duo Blues
05 – My Friend John

Personnel:
Art Pepper – alto saxophone
Hank Jones – piano (except on “Duo Blues”)
Ron Carter – bass (except on “Lover Man”)
Al Foster – drums (except on “Duo Blues” and “Lover Man”)

Recorded February 23, 1979 at Sound Ideas, NYC;
and May 26, 1979 at Kendum Recorders, Burbank, CA.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Ron Carter – Blues Farm {Epic}


Review by Nathan Bush (allmusic.com)

In 1968, having completed a five-year stint with Miles Davis, Ron Carter’s career was wide open. Finding himself in typically high demand, the bassist decided not to make any long-term commitments (though he continued to join individual recording dates), opting instead to develop his solo career. In 1971, he released Uptown Conversation (Atlantic). Shortly after, he signed to the CTI label, releasing Blues Farm in 1973. The bass is rarely found in such a prominent role, its melodic qualities typically being subordinate to rhythmic ones. The presence of a pianist, guitarist, and two percussionists on Blues Farm frees Carter to explore both realms. Working with Davis was obviously a valuable experience. On numbers like “Footprints” (from Miles Smiles, 1965), Carter was required to extend and compress time, a technique that is second nature to him on Blues Farm. Dense, dexterous runs are broken up by long, bending lines and shades of blues phrasing, all executed with absolute grace. His playing becomes slightly imposing on “Django.” While it’s great to hear him lead the group on a tour through the song’s shifting rhythms, the accompanists aren’t allowed much space. Carter’s playing is best when more deeply integrated. On the title track, he engages in a wonderful exchange with flutist Hubert Laws, with the two swapping solos back and forth. On “Hymn for Him,” his probing lines enrich the song, pushing its narrative forward. The best comes last as the group rides “R2, M1” to the album’s conclusion. The song subsists largely on the group’s energy (the most they display outwardly on the album) and Carter’s deep, repetitious groove. Unfortunately, great musicianship does not always make for compelling results. Blues Farm’s excursions are enjoyable, but somewhat reserved. Both the compositions and performances avoid strong emotions in favor of pleasing palettes of color and texture. The early-’70s production values only enhance this by softening the bed of musical tones. The resulting polish tranquilizes the sound and ultimately dates the album.

Tracks:
01 – Blues Farm
02 – A Small Ballad
03 – Django
04 – A Hymn for Him
05 – Two-Beat Johnson
06 – R2, M1

Personnel:
Ron Carter – bass, piccolo bass
Billy Cobham – drums
Hubert Laws – flutes
Ralp MacDonald – percussion
Bob James – electric piano
Richard Tee – organ, electric piano
Gene Bertoncini, Sam Brown – electric guitar

Recorded at Van Gelder Studios, January 10, 1973.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Chet Baker – She Was Too Good to Me {SONY} “Masterworks Jazz”


Review from “chetbakertribute.com”

Besides being a great recording, this one also has some historical significance, as it is viewed by many as Chet’s “comeback” album. Although Baker recorded in the late sixties, they were really dreadful commercial albums. This is the first significant recording Chet made since the ’65 Prestige sessions. It also marks the beginning of a very successful association with Creed Taylor and CTI Records. Chet recorded some of best work for CTI in the mid-to-late 1970’s.
Bob James’ electric piano and some strings (just the right amount) give this CD a unique flavor.

Tracks:
01 – Autumn Leaves
02 – She Was Too Good to Me
03 – Funk in Deep Freeze
04 – Tangerine
05 – With a Song in My Heart
06 – What’ll I Do
07 – It’s You or No One
08 – My Future Just Passed

Personnel:
Chet Baker – trumpet and vocal
Paul Desmond – alto saxophone
Bob James – electric piano
Ron Carter – bass
Jack DeJohnette, Steve Gadd – drums
Dave Friedman – vibes
Hubert Laws – flue and alto flute
Rome Penque – flute and clarinet
George Marge – alto flute and oboe d’amore

Violins: Lewis Eley, Max Ellen, Barry Finclair, Paul Gershman,
Harry Glickman, Emanuel Green, Harold Kohon, David Nadien, Herbert Sorkin

Cellos: Warren Lash, Jesse Levy, George Ricci

Arranged and Conducted by Don Sebesky

Recorded on July 17 and November 1, 1974
1974, 1987, 2010, SONY Music Entertainment.

Quality: xld, flac, cue, log, artwork

Stanley Turrentine – Salt Song {SONY}


Review by Steve Huey (allmusic.com)

Stanley Turrentine’s stint with Creed Taylor’s CTI label may not have produced any out-and-out classics on the level of the very best LPs by Freddie Hubbard, Hubert Laws, or George Benson, but the bluesy tenorist’s output was consistently strong and worthwhile for all but the most stridently anti-fusion listeners. Salt Song was Turrentine’s second album for CTI, and while it’s perhaps just a small cut below his debut Sugar, it’s another fine, eclectic outing that falls squarely into the signature CTI fusion sound: smooth but not slick, accessible but not simplistic. In general, keyboardist Eumir Deodato’s arrangements have plenty of light funk and Brazilian underpinnings, the latter often courtesy of percussionist Airto Moreira. The first three cuts are the most memorable, beginning with a ten-minute exploration of the abrupt time signature shifts of Freddie Hubbard’s “Gibraltar.” Though a hard bop version might have returned to the theme a little less often, Turrentine’s solo sections are full of ideas, befitting one of his favorite pieces of the period; plus, guitarist Eric Gale shines as both a rhythm and lead player. The traditional gospel tune “I Told Jesus” features Turrentine at his bluesiest and earthiest, with snatches of ethereal choir vocals floating up behind him. Milton Nascimento’s title track, naturally, has the strongest Brazilian flavor of the program, and Turrentine skillfully negotiates its frequent shifts in and out of double time. The 1997 CD reissue also includes Nascimento’s “Vera Cruz” as a bonus track. All in all, Salt Song has dated well, partly because the arrangements don’t overemphasize electric piano, but mostly on the strength of Turrentine’s always-soulful playing.

Tracks:
01 – Gibraltar
02 – I Told Jesus
03 – Salt Song
04 – I Haven’t Got Anything Better to Do
05 – Storm
06 – Vera Cruz (bonus)

Personnel:
Stanley Turrentine – tenor saxophone
Ron Carter, Russell George – bass
Billy Cobham, Airto Moreira – drums
Airto Moreira, Joao Palma, Dom Um Romao – percussion
Eumir Deodato, Horace Parlan, Richard Tee – piano/electric piano/organ
Eric Gale, Sivuca – guitar
Hubert Laws, George Marge, Romeo Penque, Jerome Richardson – flute
Julius Brand, Paul Gershman, Julie Held, Leo Kahn, Harry Katzman, Joe Malin – violin
Harold Coletta – viola
Charles McCracken, Alan Shulman – cello
Margaret Branch, Brenda Bryant, Patricia Smith – voices

Arranged and conducted by Eumir Deodato
Tracks 1-5 recorded at Van Gelder Studios, July 7 & 13, 1971
Track 6 recorded at Van Gelder Studios, April 23, 1971

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Herbie Hancock – Maiden Voyage {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine (allmusic.com)

Less overtly adventurous than its predecessor, Empyrean Isles, Maiden Voyage nevertheless finds Herbie Hancock at a creative peak. In fact, it’s arguably his finest record of the ’60s, reaching a perfect balance between accessible, lyrical jazz and chance-taking hard bop. By this point, the pianist had been with Miles Davis for two years, and it’s clear that Miles’ subdued yet challenging modal experiments had been fully integrated by Hancock. Not only that, but through Davis, Hancock became part of the exceptional rhythm section of bassist Ron Carter and drummer Tony Williams, who are both featured on Maiden Voyage, along with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard and tenor saxophonist George Coleman. The quintet plays a selection of five Hancock originals, many of which are simply superb showcases for the group’s provocative, unpredictable solos, tonal textures, and harmonies. While the quintet takes risks, the music is lovely and accessible, thanks to Hancock’s understated, melodic compositions and the tasteful group interplay. All of the elements blend together to make Maiden Voyage a shimmering, beautiful album that captures Hancock at his finest as a leader, soloist, and composer.

Tracks:
01 – Maiden Voyage
02 – The Eye of the Hurricane
03 – Little One
04 – Survival of the Fittest
05 – Dolphin Dance

Personnel:
Freddie Hubbard – trumpet
George Coleman – tenor sax
Herbie Hancock – piano
Ron Carter – bass
Anthony Williams – drums

Originally released in 1965 on Blue Note as BST-84195.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork