Coleman Hawkins – In a Mellow Tone {Prestige}[OJC]


Review from “cduniverse.com”
Few jazz giants have been as important and as relevant for as long as the Bean, a revealing nickname; it’s apparently a contraction of “the best and only.” Hawkins received this appellation during his tenure with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. The saxophonist’s gruff yet mellifluous, smoky yet coarse tone influenced generations of musicians.

This compilation features music from Hawkins’ years with Prestige Records. Filled with many exciting and tranquil moments, IN A MELLOW TONE captures a great period in the saxophonist’s forty-plus year career. The album’s opener, “You Blew Out the Flame In My Heart” displays Hawkins’ ability to swing with a light buoyant feel, while ballads such as “I Want to Be Loved,” “Greensleeves,” “Then I’ll be Tired of You,” and “Until the Real Thing Comes Along” show the degree of delicacy and intimacy of which Hawkins was capable. Finally, the album’s title track brims with energy and verve, due in large part to Gus Johnson’s crisp drumming.

Tracklist:
01 – You Blew Out the Flame in My Heart
02 – I Want to Be Loved
03 – In a Mellow Tone
04 – Greensleeves
05 – Through for the Night
06 – Until the Real Thing Comes Along
07 – The Sweetest Sounds
08 – Then I’ll Be Tired of You
09 – Jammin’ in Swingville

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis – tenor sax
Hilton Jefferson – alto sax
Jimmy Hamilton – clarinet
Vic Dickenson, J.C. Higginbotham – trombone
Joe Thomas, Charlie Shavers, Joe Newman – trumpet
Tommy Flanagan, Red Garland, Ray Bryant – piano
Kenny Burrell, Tiny Grimes – guitar
Wendell Marshall, Doug Watkins, Ron Carter, George Duvivier, Major Jolley – bass
Osie Johnson, Charles “Specs” Wright, Gus Johnson, Eddie Locke, Bill English – drums

Recorded between November 7, 1958 – March 30, 1962;
at Hackensack, NJ (#2, 4, 5 and 6); and Englewood Cliffs, NJ (#1, 3, 7, 8 and 9)

Label: Prestige – OJC
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream Jazz, Saxophone

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Advertisements

Red Garland – The Nearness of You {JazzLand}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Unlike his slightly earlier recordings for Moodsville (which feature Red Garland on unaccompanied piano solos), this strictly ballad date has Garland joined (on all but the solo “Lush Life”) by bassist Larry Ridley and drummer Frank Gant. Since all eight of the standards are taken at the same medium/slow tempo, there is not much variety here, keeping the CD from being essential. But Garland’s attractive and distinctive chord voicings, plus his ability to uplift melodies while swinging at a slow speed, make this project a success. Highlights include “The Nearness of You,” “Where or When,” and Irving Berlin’s “All Alone.” Particularly effective when used as background music.

Tracks:
01 – Why Was I Born?
02 – The Nearness of You
03 – Where or When
04 – Long Ago and Far Away
05 – I Got it Bad (And That Ain’t Good)
06 – Don’t Worry About Me
07 – Lush Life
08 – All Alone

Personnel:
Red Garland – piano
Larry Ridley – bass
Frank Gant – drums

Recorded and mastered at Plaza Sound Studios, New York City; November 30, 1961

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Red Garland Trio – Groovy {Prestige}[xrcd]


Review by Michael G. Nastos (allmusic.com)

Red Garland’s third recording as a leader has him playing very well, somewhat energetic and more inclusive in his direction to span the mainstream jazz palate beyond the cool exterior he emanates. The title might be a bit deceptive, for this is not a project where soul-jazz or early boogaloo influences turned jazzmen into groovemeisters — it’s a swinging groove. With bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Art Taylor, Garland has all the support he needs to wing it in a variety of directions. Recorded in that most legendary year of jazz, 1957, Garland is coming into his own in a more confident way, buoyed by his association at the time with Miles Davis. Chambers is flawless in his support role, and on this recording deserves a close listen, especially for students of the acoustic upright. They immediately dig in on the opener “C Jam Blues,” with Garland at his heartiest during his bridge solo, they agree in the affirmative during the entirety of the hard bop take of “Will You Still Be Mine?,” and repeat but modify the melody à la “Cool Blues” in an adept display of artistry for “Hey Now.” Of course Garland has to play a ballad or two, as on “Willow Weep for Me,” luscious with chord sequences, and really reflects the influence of Erroll Garner in that chiming, two-handed sustenato style for Garner’s “Gone Again.” It is said that by the third recording, most musicians should have their style down pat and begin attempting to take the music to a higher level. You really hear that in this recording, which was a springboard to making Red Garland one of the most revered and respected jazz pianists of the modern era.

Tracks:
01 – C Jam Blues
02 – Gone Again
03 – Will You Still Be Mine?
04 – Willow Weep for Me
05 – What Can I Say, Dear
06 – Hey Now

Personnel:
Red Garland – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Art Taylor – drums

Recorded at Van Gelder Studios, Hackensack, New Jersey; December 14, 1956,
May 24 and August 9, 1957.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Red Garland Trio – Bright and Breezy {Jazzland}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

During 1961-1962, following a long series of recordings for Prestige, pianist Red Garland recorded four LPs for the Jazzland label. His style was unchanged from a few years earlier, and this trio set with bassist Sam Jones and drummer Charlie Persip (reissued on CD on the Original Jazz Classics label) is very much up to par. Highlights include Garland’s interpretations of “I Ain’t Got Nobody,” “Blues in the Closet,” and “Lil’ Darlin’.” An enjoyable straight-ahead session.

Tracks:
01 – On Green Dolphin Street
02 – I Ain’t Got Nobody
03 – You’ll Never Know
04 – Blues in the Closet
05 – What’s New
06 – Lil’ Darlin’
07 – What is There to Say?
08 – So Sorry Please

Personnel:
Red Garland – piano
Sam Jones – bass
Charlie Persip – drums

Recorded at Plaza Sound Studios, New York City; July 19, 1961

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Miles Davis Quartet – Musings of Miles {Riverside}[DCC] “mono”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Miles Davis was in the process of forming his first classic quintet when he recorded this date, a Prestige set reissued by the audiophile label DCC Compact Classics. The trumpeter is featured on a quartet outing with pianist Red Garland, bassist Oscar Pettiford, and drummer Philly Joe Jones, playing four standards plus a blues (“Green Haze”) and “I Didn’t,” his answer to Thelonious Monk’s “Well, You Needn’t.” Garland and Jones would soon be in Miles’ group, although the fiery Pettiford proved too difficult for the trumpeter to handle and was quickly succeeded by Paul Chambers. The interpretations are generally lyrical and melodic; even “A Night in Tunisia” sounds a bit mellow. Likable if not essential music.

Tracks:
01 – Will You Still Be Mine?
02 – I See Your Face Before Me
03 – I Didn’t
04 – A Gal in Calico
05 – A Night in Tunisia
06 – Green Haze

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet
Red Garland – piano
Oscar Pettiford – bass
Philly Joe Jones – drums

Recorded in Hackensack, New Jersey; June 7, 1955.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Miles Davis Quintet, “The New” – Miles {Prestige}[DCC] “mono”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Although they had made a few slightly earlier cuts that would later be issued on Columbia, the first full-length album by the Miles Davis Quintet is quite intriguing in that it gives one a look at tenor saxophonist John Coltrane when he still had a hesitant style. This audiophile CD reissue has the same music that is currently available on an Original Jazz Classics set: five jazz standards plus “The Theme.” Unlike Coltrane, who would develop rapidly within the next year, Miles was already very much in his prime, sounding quite lyrical on “Just Squeeze Me” and “There Is No Greater Love,” and the classic rhythm section (pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones) was quickly starting to gel.

Tracks:
01 – Just Squeeze Me
02 – There is No Greater Love
03 – How am I to Know?
04 – S’posin
05 – The Theme
06 – Stablemates

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet
John Coltrane – tenor sax
Red Garland – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Philly Joe Jones – drums

Recorded in Hackensack, NJ on November 16, 1955.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

John Coltrane – Standard Coltrane {Prestige}[OJC]


Review by Steve Leggett (allmusic.com)

John Coltrane had yet to move into his modal post-bop phase in 1958 when he recorded a session for Prestige Records on July 11 with trumpeter/flügelhornist Wilbur Harden, pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Jimmy Cobb, the results of which were issued in 1962 as Standard Coltrane. His groundbreaking modal work with Miles Davis on Kind of Blue was still a few months into the future, which makes this set more historical than vital or transitional, although it’s pleasant enough, featuring Coltrane on several standards, including a ten-plus-minute version of “Invitation.” Other Coltrane material from this 1958 Prestige era ended up on the albums Stardust (1963) and Bahia (1965), and all of it, including these four tracks, has been collected on The Stardust Session from Prestige Records, which is probably the way to go.

Tracks:
01 – Don’t Take Your Love from Me
02 – I’ll Get By (As Long as I Have You)
03 – Spring is Here
04 – Invitation

Personnel:
John Coltrane – tenor sax
Wilbur Harden – trumpet
Red Garland – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Jimmy Cobb – drums

Recorded in Hackensack, NJ; July 11, 1958.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork