Ray Brown Trio featuring Gene Harris – Soular Energy {Concord} ”dvd audio-2-cd”


Review by Scott Yanow ~allmusic.com
This album is important as an early milestone in pianist Gene Harris’ second career. Harris, who had led the popular Three Sounds in the 1960s, had been living in obscurity in Boise, ID, for several years before he was urged by bassist Ray Brown to come to the West Coast for some recording sessions. Harris became a permanent member of Brown’s regular trio for quite a few years before launching his own quartet. He had lost none of his technique, soul, or swing in the interim, as he shows throughout this fine release. Seven of the eight numbers (highlighted by “Exactly Like You,” “Teach Me Tonight,” and “Sweet Georgia Brown”) feature Brown, Harris, and drummer Gerryck King playing soulful bop, while “Mistreated But Undefeated Blues” adds guitarist Emily Remler and the tenor of Red Holloway. An excellent effort.

Tracklist:
01. Exactly Like You (5:47)
02. Cry Me a River (5:47)
03. Teach Me Tonight (4:51)
04. Take the “A” Train (6:22)
05. Mistreated But Undefeated Blues (4:17)
06. That’s All (5:47)
07. Easy Does It (4:03)
08. Sweet Georgia Brown (8:46)

Personnel:
Ray Brown – bass
Gene Harris – piano
Gerryck King – drums
Red Holloway – tenor saxophone
Emily Remler – guitar

Recorded at Coast Recorders, San Francisco, California in August 1984.

Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Bop, Standards
Label: Concord Jazz
Year: 1985
Time: 45:39

* Original source was a DVD audio rip in 24bit-192kHz; and this share is a self-made imitation CD (converted to redbook standard, 16bit-44.1kHz); which can easily be burned as an “Audio-CD” to an empty media.

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + scans from “CD” version (cover+tray+disk)
Quality-2: mp3@320 + scans from “CD” version (cover+tray+disk)

Count Basie – Basie Jam {Pablo} “Analogue Productions”


Review from ~cduniverse.com
This 1973 recording, the first of two Count Basie albums for the Fantasy label highlighting impromptu jam sessions, is something of a musical party. Heard here with longtime pals Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Harry “Sweets” Edison, and others, the Count performs a set of bluesy originals. Basie and company alight in a variety of musical dialogs-joyous and heartrending, playful and stalwart. As one might expect, each player rises to the occasion. And then some. There can be little doubt that Basie’s marvelous sensitivity as an accompanist catalyzes the fine soloing on this album. “One-Nighter” hints at least twice at how invigorating it can be to play with Basie. The first instance occurs when tenor-man Zoot Sims takes over from the organ, exacting a phrase of perfect, rounded beauty. A second occurs when Edison spreads a single recurring melodic figure across a full chorus, while Basie’s organ wheezes unobtrusively in the background. A soulful and foot-stomping album, “Basie Jam” accurately represents the late swing icon in his mature years.

Tracklist:
01. Doubling Blues (07:01)
02. Hanging Out (09:34)
03. Red Bank Blues (09:05)
04. One-Nighter (11:45)
05. Freeport Blues (11:44)

Personnel:
Count Basie – piano, organ
Irving Ashby – guitar
J.J. Johnson – trombone
Harry “Sweets” Edison – trumpet
Eddie Davis, Zoot Sims – tenor sax
Ray Brown – bass
Louie Bellson – drums

Recorded December 10, 1973

Label: Pablo – “Analogue Productions” Edition
Year: 1995
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Blues
Total Time: 49:09

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans (cover+inside+tray+CD)

Phineas Newborn, Jr. – Harlem Blues {Fantasy}[xrcd]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)
The superb trio (pianist Phineas Newborn, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Elvin Jones) had never played together before but it didn’t matter. They had little trouble finding common ground. The virtuosic pianist (still in peak form) leads the way on such pieces as his “Harlem Blues,” “Ray’s Idea” (composed decades earlier by Brown) and Horace Silver’s “Cookin’ at the Continental.”

Tracklist:
01. Harlem Blues (04:12)
02. Sweet and Lovely (07:38)
03. Little Girl Blue (06:15)
04. Ray’s Idea (05:21)
05. Stella By Starlight (06:00)
06. Tenderly (05:56)
07. Cookin’ at the Continental (03:08)

Personnel:
Phineas Newborn, Jr. – piano
Ray Brown – bass
Elvin Jones – drums

Recorded at Contemporary’s Studio, Los Angeles; February 12 and 13, 1969

Label: Fantasy – xrcd Edition
Year: 1999
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Hard Bop, Piano Trio
Total Time: 38:29

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork(cover+tray+inside+CD)

{re-up}

Ben Webster meets Oscar Peterson {Verve} “Master Edition”


Review by Stephen Cook (allmusic.com)

Another fine Webster release on Verve that sees the tenor great once again backed by the deluxe Oscar Peterson Trio. In keeping with the high standard of their Soulville collaboration of two years prior, Webster and the trio — Peterson is joined by bassist Ray Brown and drummer Ed Thigpen — use this 1959 date to conduct a clinic in ballad playing. And while Soulville certainly ranks as one of the tenor saxophonist’s best discs, the Ben Webster Meets Oscar Peterson set gets even higher marks for its almost transcendent marriage of after-hours elegance and effortless mid-tempo swing — none of Webster’s boogie-woogie piano work to break up the mood here. Besides reinvigorating such lithe strollers as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (nice bass work by Brown here) and “This Can’t Be Love,” Webster and company achieve classic status for their interpretation of the Sinatra gem “In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning.” And to reassure Peterson fans worried about scant solo time for their hero, the pianist lays down a healthy number of extended runs, unobtrusively shadowing Webster’s vaporous tone and supple phrasing along the way. Not only a definite first-disc choice for Webster newcomers, but one of the jazz legend’s all-time great records.

Tracks:
01 – The Touch of Your Lips
02 – When Your Lover has Gone
03 – Bye-bye, Blackbird
04 – How Deep Is the Ocean?
05 – In the Wee, Small Hours of the Morning
06 – Sunday
07 – This Can’t Be Love

Personnel:
Ben Webster – tenor saxophone
Oscar Peterson – piano
Ray Brown – bass
Ed Thigpen – drums

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans

{re-uploaded}

Charlie Parker – Jam Session {Verve}


Review by “Jazzcat Stef” (amazon.com)

This is an absolutly marvellous example of what Jazz was and still should be (not because it’s more mainstream than bebop, in any case I love them both). The joy of playing with friends on common grounds, the standards and blues repertoire. I think I own everything Bird has ever played/released or at least I come really near. All the Dial, Savoy, Verve, Benedetti recordings, Bird’s Eyes, Live & Broadcasts, Blue Note concerts, recent discoveries, almost everything (more than 150 cds). This album cannot be considered a pure Bird album because he shared the scene with a lot of other sax stars which gave the session a different feeling from a lot of Bird’s records. I mean that this album is more Jazz “the Kansas City way” than bebop. It is a session more traditional than bebop. The only true beboppers are Bird, Kessel and Peterson (and Brown of course). The others, Webster, Hodges, Carter etc are more traditional than strictly bebop so the overall sound is more on that side of course. But it’s not a complaint, only an obvious consideration. The album is really fresh and entertaining, you can compar eit to a lot of JATP sessions in a sense. So it’s not a “revolutionary” album, not one that set a standard or that marked a change in Jazz history, nevertheless it’s essential in its way. It is a perect representation of what Jazz was more at Lester Young time than Bird time, but it’s very very good. It deserves 5 stars absolutly. Every player shined here and found his time to strecht out and show his bags of tricks fully. One of the highlights is the comping by Oscar Peterson swing machine which gave to the session a fabolous imprinting. The program is damn good. Two very long blues tunes, a very beautiful standard (“What is this thing” one of the standards I love the most) and a ballad medley. Fantastic! And even if Bird is playing more or less his usual cliches and nothing more, he’s still Bird! I love this album, for real. Buy it, you will love it for years and years too.

Tracks:
01 – Jam Blues
02 – What is This Thing Called Love
03 – Ballad Medley:
a) All the Things You Are
b) Dearly Beloved
c) The Nearness of You
d) I’ll Get By
e) Everything Happens to Me
f) The Man I Love
g) What’s New
h) Someone to Watch Over Me
i) Isn’t it Romantic?
04 – Funky Blues

Personnel:
Charlie Shavers, Benny Carter, Charlie Parker, Johnny Hodges – alto sax
Flip Phillips, Ben Webster – tenor sax
Oscar Peterson – piano
Barney Kessel – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
J.C. Heard – drums

Recorded July, 1952; Los Angeles.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Duke Ellington Quartet – Duke’s Big Four {Pablo}[xrcd]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

One of Duke Ellington’s finest small group sessions from his final decade was this frequently exciting quartet date with guitarist Joe Pass, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Louie Bellson. Ellington’s percussive style always sounded modern and he comes up with consistently strong solos on such numbers as “Love You Madly,” “The Hawk Talks” and especially “Cotton Tail,” easily keeping up with his younger sidemen. Highly recommended.

Tracks:
01 – Cotton Tail
02 – The Blues
03 – The Hawk Talks
04 – Prelude to a Kiss
05 – Love You Madly
06 – Just Squeeze Me (But Don’t Tease Me)
07 – Everything But You

Personnel:
Duke Ellington – piano
Joe Pass – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Louis Bellson – drums

Recorded in Los Angeles; January 8, 1973.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson – The Trio “Live from Chicago” {Verve}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

The Oscar Peterson Trio with bassist Ray Brown and drummer Ed Thigpen lacked the competitiveness of his earlier group with Brown and guitarist Herb Ellis, and the later daring of his solo performances, but the pianist was generally in peak form during this era. He sticks to standards on this live CD (a good example of the Trio’s playing), stretching out “Sometimes I’m Happy” creatively for over 11 minutes and uplifting such songs as “In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning,” “Chicago” and “The Night We Called It a Day.” Few surprises occur, but Peterson plays at such a consistently high level that one doesn’t mind.

Tracks:
01 – I’ve Never Been in Love Before
02 – In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning
03 – Chicago
04 – The Night We Called it a Day
05 – Sometimes I’m Happy
06 – Whisper Not
07 – Billy Boy

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Ray Brown – bass
Ed Thigpen – drums

Recorded September-October 1961 at the London House, Chicago.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson Trio – We Get Requests {Verve}[K2HD]


Review by Stuart Broomer (amazon.com)

This 1964 studio session features the Peterson trio with bassist Ray Brown and Ed Thigpen, a group that had been together for five years by then and performed like a well-oiled machine. The repertoire is mostly pop songs of the day, including bossa nova tunes and film themes, and the treatments are fairly brief, with emphasis placed squarely on the melodies. Even in their lightest moments, though, the group demonstrates some of the qualities that made it among the most influential piano trios in jazz, a group that could generate tremendous rhythmic energy and a sense of developing musical detail. For all his legendary force, Peterson possesses a subtle rhythmic sense, and here he infuses even “People” with an undercurrent of swing. This is undemanding, tuneful music best suited for casual listening, but it still sparkles with the trio’s customary élan.

Tracks:
01 – You Look Good to Me
02 – Time and Again
03 – My One and Only Love
04 – Corcovado (Quiet Night of Quiet Stars)
05 – The Day of Wine and Roses
06 – People
07 – Have You met Miss Jones?
08 – The Girl from Ipanema
09 – D. & E.
10 – Goodbye J. D.

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Ray Brown – bass
Ed Thigpen – drums

Recording Dates:
Batch 1: October 19, 1964 for tracks 4, 7 and 8;
Batch 2: October 20, 1964 for tracks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 9
Batch 3: November 19 or 20, 1964 for track 10

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson – The More I See You {TELARC}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

After Oscar Peterson suffered a severe stroke in the spring of 1993, it was feared that he would never again play on a professional level, but two years of intense therapy resulted in the masterful pianist returning to what sounds, on this Telarc CD, like near-prime form. For the all-star date, The More I See You, Peterson tears into seven standards and two blues and outswings all potential competitors. Altoist Benny Carter at 87 sounds like he is 47 (if Carter had retired back in 1940 he would still be a legend), and flugelhornist Clark Terry (here 74) proves to be not only (along with the remarkable 90-year-old Doc Cheatham) the finest trumpeter over 70 but one of the top brassmen of any age. The cool-toned guitarist Lorne Lofsky and drummer Lewis Nash are also strong assets while bassist Ray Brown (a year younger than Peterson at a mere 68) displays his typical limitless energy on appealing tunes such as “In a Mellow Tone,” “When My Dream Boat Comes Home,” and a medium/up-tempo version of “For All We Know.” The musicians all play up to their usual high level, making this a joyous comeback album for the great Oscar Peterson.

Tracks:
01 – In a Mellow Tone
02 – Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good to You
03 – On the Trail
04 – When My Dream Boat Comes Home
05 – Ron’s Blues
06 – For All We Know
07 – Blues for Lisa
08 – Squatty Roo
09 – The More I See You

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Benny Carter – alto saxophone
Clark Terry – trumpet & flugelhorn
Ray Brown – bass
Lorne Lofsky – guitar
Lewis Nash – drums

Released on 1995 by Telarc Distribution.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans

Oscar Peterson – Blues Etude {PolyGram}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This CD reissue finds pianist Oscar Peterson at a transitional point in his career. Louis Hayes was the new drummer in his trio and, although veteran Ray Brown is on bass during the earlier of the two sessions, by 1966 he would depart after 15 years and be replaced by Sam Jones. However, the basic sound of the Oscar Peterson Trio remained unchanged (Peterson was the dominant voice anyway) and the personality of the group remained intact. Peterson contributed three originals (including the hard-swinging title cut) to this program and also sounds typically fine on “Let’s Fall in Love,” “The Shadow of Your Smile,” “If I Were a Bell,” and a definitive version of “Stella by Starlight.”

Tracks:
01 – Blues Etude
02 – Shelley’s World
03 – Let’s Fall in Love
04 – The Shadow of Your Smile
05 – If I Were a Bell
06 – Stella by Starlight
07 – Bossa Beguine
08 – L’Impossible
09 – I Know You Oh So Well

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Sam Jones, Ray Brown – bass
Louis Hayes – drums

Recorded on December 3, 1965 and May 4, 1966

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Joe Pass – Portraits of Duke Ellington {Pablo} “Japan”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Recorded just a month after Duke Ellington’s death, this tribute album (reissued on CD) features guitarist Joe Pass (just beginning to become famous), bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Bobby Durham jamming on eight Ellington tunes and “Caravan” (which was penned by one of Duke’s key sidemen, Juan Tizol). The interplay between the three musicians is quite impressive, and Pass’ mastery of the guitar is obvious (he didn’t really need the other sidemen). Highlights include “In a Mellow Tone,” “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore,” and “I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good).” Recommended.

Tracks:
01 – Satin Doll
02 – I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart
03 – Sophisticated Lady
04 – I Got It Bad (and that Ain’t Good)
05 – In a Mellow Tone
06 – Solitude
07 – Don’t Get Around Much Anymore
08 – Do Nothin’ ’till You Hear from Me
09 – Caravan

Personnel:
Joe Pass – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Bobby Durham – drums

Recorded on June 21, 1974

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Milt Jackson – It Don’t Mean a Thing If You Can’t Tap Your Foot to It {Pablo}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Vibraphonist Milt Jackson’s recording career has been remarkably consistent, and his Pablo recordings of 1975-85 are uniformly excellent. This particular set features his 1984 quartet (a group consisting of pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Mickey Roker) performing four obscure group originals and three standards with swing, subtle creativity and soul. This CD is a good example of Milt Jackson’s enjoyable music.

Tracks:
01 – Midnight Waltz
02 – Ain’t that Nothin’
03 – Stress and Trauma
04 – Used to be Jackson
05 – It Don’t Mean a Thing (If it Ain’t Got that Swing)
06 – If I Were a Bell
07 – Close Enough for Love

Personnel:
Milt Jackson – vibes
Ray Brown – bass
Cedar Walton – piano
Mickey Roker – drums

Recorded at RCA Studios, New York City; July 1984.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster {Verve} “Originals”


Review from cduniverse.com

“Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster” highlights the talents of both tenor men nicely, with Hawkins and Webster consistently complementing each other’s playing. In fact, they develop a kind of conversational interplay that is quite beautiful, particularly on the gentle “It Never Entered My Mind” and the slowly swinging “Shine on Harvest Moon.” Although the rest of the band consists of stellar musicians (including pianist Oscar Peterson and guitarist Herb Ellis), they concede the spotlight to Hawkins and Webster, whose dual saxophones more than carry the record. Other standout tracks include the sultry ballad “Tangerine” and the Latin-flavored “La Rosita.”

Tracks:
01 – Blues for Yolande (stereo)
02 – It Never Entered My Mind
03 – La Rosita
04 – You’d Be So Nice to Come Home To
05 – Prisoner of Love
06 – Tangerine
07 – Shine on Harvest Moon
08 – Blues for Yolande (mono)
09 – Blues for Yolande (incomplete takes)

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster – tenor saxophone
Oscar Peterson – piano
Herb Ellis – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Alvin Stoller – drums

Recorded October 1957 in Hollwyood

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Louis Armstrong meets Oscar Peterson {Verve} “Silver Collection”


Review by Review by Michael G. Nastos (allmusic.com)

By 1957, hard bop was firmly established as the jazz of now, while pianist Oscar Peterson and his ensemble with bassist Ray Brown and guitarist Herb Ellis were making their own distinctive presence known as a true working band playing standards in the swing tradition. Louis Armstrong was more recognizable to the general public as a singer instead of the pioneering trumpet player we all know he was. But popularity contests being the trend, Armstrong’s newer fans wanted to hear him entertain them, so in retrospect it was probably a good move to feature his vocalizing on these tracks with Peterson’s band and guest drummer Louie Bellson sitting in. The standard form of Armstrong singing the lead lines, followed by playing his pithy and witty horn solos based on the melody secondarily, provides the basis for the format on this charming but predictable recording. What happens frequently is that Armstrong and Peterson play lovely ad lib vocal/piano duets at the outset of many tunes. They are all songs you likely know, with few upbeat numbers or obscure choices, and four extra tracks tacked onto the CD version past the original sessions. In fact, it is the familiarity of songs like the midtempo “Let’s Fall in Love,” with Armstrong’s gravelly and scat singing, and his marvelous ability to riff off of the basic songs that make these offerings endearing. A classic take of “Blues in the Night” is the showstopper, while choosing “Moon Song” is a good, off the beaten path pick as the trumpeter plays two solo choruses, and he leads out on his horn for once during the slightly bouncy, basic blues “I Was Doing All Right.” Some extremely slow tunes crop up on occasion, like “How Long Has This Been Going On?,” an atypically downtempo take of “Let’s Do It,” and “You Go to My Head,” featuring Peterson’s crystalline piano. Liner note author Leonard Feather opines that this is Armstrong’s first attempt at the latter tune, and compares it historically to Billie Holiday. There are the dependable swingers “Just One of Those Things,” “I Get a Kick Out of You,” and “Sweet Lorraine” with Peterson at his accompanying best; a ramped-up version of the usually downtrodden “Willow Weep for Me”; and a duet between Armstrong and Ellis on the sad two-minute ditty “There’s No You.” All in all, it’s difficult to critique or find any real fault with these sessions, though Peterson is subsumed by the presence of Armstrong, who, as Feather notes, really needs nobody’s help. That this was their only collaboration speaks volumes of how interactive and communal the session really was, aside from the music made being fairly precious.

Tracks:
01 – That Old Feeling
02 – Let’s Fall in Love
03 – I’ll Never Be the Same
04 – Blues in the Night
05 – How Long Has This Been Going On
06 – I Was Doing All Right
07 – What’s New
08 – Moon Song
09 – Just One of Those Things
10 – There’s No You
11 – You Go to My Head
12 – Sweet Lorraine
13 – I Get a Kick Out of You
14 – Makin’ Whoopee
15 – Willow Weep for Me
16 – Let’s Do It (Let’s Fall in Love)

Personnel:
Louis Armstrong – vocals, trumpet
Oscar Peterson – piano
Herb Ellis – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Louis Bellson – drums

Tracks 1-12, stereo, recorded in Chicago; October 14, 1957
Tracks 13-16, mono, recorded in Los Angeles; July 31, 1957

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Sonny Stitt – Sits in with the Oscar Peterson Trio {Verve}


Review by Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This CD combines a complete session that Sonny Stitt (doubling on alto and tenor) did with the 1959 Oscar Peterson Trio (which includes the pianist/leader, bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Ed Thigpen) and three titles from 1957 with Peterson, Brown, guitarist Herb Ellis, and drummer Stan Levey. The music very much has the feel of a jam session and, other than a themeless blues, all of the songs are veteran standards. Highlights of this fine effort include “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love,” “The Gypsy,” “Scrapple from the Apple,” “Easy Does It,” and “I Remember You.” Lots of cooking music.

Tracks:
01 – I Can’t Give You Anything But Love
02 – Au Privave
03 – The Gypsy
04 – I’ll Remember April
05 – Scrapple from the Apple
06 – Moten Swing
07 – Blues for Pres, Sweets, Ben & all the Other Funky Ones
08 – Easy Does It
09 – I Didn’t Know what Time it Was
10 – I Remember You
11 – I Know that You Know

Personnel:
Sonny Stitt – alto & tenor saxophone
Oscar Peterson – piano
Herb Ellis – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Ed Thigpen, Stan Levey – drums

Recorded May 18, 1959 (tracks 1-8); October 10, 1957 (tracks 9-11)

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson Trio with Milt Jackson – Very Tall {Verve}[MFSL]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This first matchup on records between pianist Oscar Peterson and vibraphonist Milt Jackson was so logical that it is surprising it did not occur five years earlier. Originally recorded for Verve and three decades later reissued on this audiophile CD by Mobile Fidelity, the quartet set (which also includes bassist Ray Brown and drummer Ed Thigpen) swings as hard as one might expect. Highlights include “On Green Dolphin Street,” “The Work Song,” “John Brown’s Body” (a jam on “Battle Hymn of the Republic”) and “Reunion Blues.” Fortunately O.P. and Bags would meet up on records many times in the future (particularly during their Pablo years) but this first effort is a particularly strong set.

Tracks:
01 – Green Dolphin Street
02 – Heartstrings
03 – The Work Song
04 – John Brown’s Body
05 – A Wonderful Guy
06 – Reunion Blues

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Milt Jackson – vibes
Ray Brown – bass
Ed Thigpen – drums

Recorded on December, 1961

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, covers

Andre Previn, Mundell Lowe, Ray Brown – Old Friends {TELARC}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Andre Previn’s “jazz comeback” has been a welcome event even though he clearly regards his jazz playing as an occasional affair. It is to Previn’s great credit that when he plays improvised music he sounds like a fulltime jazz pianist. This trio outing with guitarist Mundell Lowe and bassist Ray Brown was his third jazz date of the period and features the veteran players swinging standards lightly but with passion. A medley has unaccompanied solos by each of the musicians; other highlights include cooking versions of “Stompin’ at the Savoy,” “One O’Clock Jump,” “Topsy” and “Sweet Georgia Brown” in addition to some heartfelt ballad renditions.

Tracks:
01 – But Not for Me
02 – Stars Fell on Alabama
03 – Stompin’ at the Savoy
04 – Medley: Darn That Dream / Here’s That Rainy Day / Polka Dots and Moonbeams
05 – On O’Clock Jump
06 – Topsy
07 – Medley: The Bad and the Beautiful / Laura
08 – Moonsweeper Blues
09 – Over the Rainbow
10 – Satin Doll
11 – Sweet Georgia Brown

Personnel:
Andre Previn – piano
Mundell Lowe – guitar
Ray Brown – bass

Recorded live at SummerFest La Jolla; a production of
La Jolla Chamber Music Society, on August 24, 1991.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Coleman Hawkins – Genius of Coleman Hawkins {Verve}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Genius may not be the right word, but “brilliance” certainly fits. At the age of 51 in 1957, Hawkins had already been on records for 35 years and had been one of the leading tenors for nearly that long. This date matches him with the Oscar Peterson Trio (plus drummer Alvin Stoller) for a fine run-through on standards. Hawk plays quite well, although the excitement level does not reach the heights of his sessions with trumpeter Roy Eldridge.

Tracks:
01 – I’ll Never Be the Same
02 – You’re Blase
03 – I Wished on the Moon
04 – How Long Has This Been Going On
05 – Like Someone in Love
06 – My Melancholy Baby
07 – Ill Wind
08 – In a Mellowtone
09 – There’s No You
10 – The World is Wainting for the Sunrise
11 – Somebody Loves Me
12 – Blues for Rene

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins – tenor saxophone
Oscar Peterson – piano
Herb Ellis – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Alvin Stoller – drums

Recorded October 16, 1957 at Capitol Studios in Los Angeles.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Ray Brown Trio – Bam Bam Bam {Concord}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

The Ray Brown Trio is caught on this CD live at a Tokyo concert and sounds obviously inspired by the enthusiastic crowd. The group (which also stars pianist Gene Harris and drummer Jeff Hamilton) stretches out on four standards, “Put Your Little Right Out,” Victor Feldman’s “Rio” and two Brown originals: “F.S.R. (For Sonny Rollins)” and the title cut. This release is a perfect introduction to the many fine Ray Brown-Gene Harris Concord recordings; it consistently swings with soul.

Tracks:
01 – Introductory Announcement
02 – F.S.R. (For Sonny Rollins)
03 – Put Your Little Foot Right Out
04 – Rio
05 – If I Loved You
06 – Introductory Announcement
07 – Summertime
08 – Days of Wine and Roses
09 – Introductory Announcement
10 – A Night in Tunisia
11 – Bam Bam Bam

Personnel:
Ray Brown – bass
Gene Harris – piano
Jeff Hamilton – drums

Recorded live at Kan-i Hoken Hall, Tokyo, Japan; December 1988

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson – Reunion Blues {MPS}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Pianist Oscar Peterson joins up with his old friends, vibraphonist Milt Jackson and bassist Ray Brown, in addition to his drummer of the period, Louis Hayes, for a particularly enjoyable outing. After a throwaway version of the Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” the all-star quartet performs Jackson’s title cut, Benny Carter’s ballad “Dream of You,” and four standards. Although not up to the excitement of Peterson’s best Pablo recordings of the 1970s, this is an enjoyable album.

Tracks:
01 – Satisfaction
02 – Dream of You
03 – Someday My Prince will Come
04 – A Time for Love
05 – Reunion Blues
06 – When I Fall in Love
07 – Red Top

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Milt Jackson – vibraphone
Ray Brown – bass
Louis Hayes – drums

Recorded at MPS-Tonstudio, Villingen; 1972

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Barney Kessel with Shelly Manne & Ray Brown – The Poll Winners {Fantasy}[xrcd]


Review by Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr. (allmusic.com)

If the picture of three grown men hanging onto giant, colored swirl sticks looks a bit odd, or if the title The Poll Winners seems a bit conceited, the music, nonetheless — recorded in 1957 — still sounds great in 2002. Besides, guitarist Barney Kessel, bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Shelly Manne really did win polls in Down Beat, Playboy, and Metronome in 1956, and this is precisely what brought the players together. Here, on their first outing, they interpret nine pieces for 40 lovely minutes of modern jazz. After kicking off with a fine take on Duke Jordan’s “Jordu,” the group delivers an emotionally warm, six-minute version of “Satin Doll,” one the album’s highlights. While each player is always fully engaged in this small setting, Kessel’s guitar supplies the lead voice. His expressive style has more in common with bluesy players like Kenny Burrell than cool ones like Tal Farlow. This quality leads to sensitive interpretations of melody-filled standards like “On Green Dolphin Street” and “It Could Happen to You.” As is traditional in small settings, both Manne and Brown are also given a piece of the action, usually near the end of a tune. The choice of material, the interplay between the three players, and the lead work all meld together beautifully on The Poll Winners

Tracks:
01 – Jordu
02 – Satin Doll
03 – It Could Happen to You
04 – Mean to Me
05 – Don’t Worry ’bout Me
06 – On Green Dolphin Street
07 – You Go to My Head
08 – Minor Mood
09 – Nagasaki

Personnel:
Barney Kessel – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Shelly Manne – drums

Recorded at Contemporary’s Studio in Los Angeles; March 18-19, 1957.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork