Ray Brown Trio featuring Gene Harris – Soular Energy {Concord} ”dvd audio-2-cd”


Review by Scott Yanow ~allmusic.com
This album is important as an early milestone in pianist Gene Harris’ second career. Harris, who had led the popular Three Sounds in the 1960s, had been living in obscurity in Boise, ID, for several years before he was urged by bassist Ray Brown to come to the West Coast for some recording sessions. Harris became a permanent member of Brown’s regular trio for quite a few years before launching his own quartet. He had lost none of his technique, soul, or swing in the interim, as he shows throughout this fine release. Seven of the eight numbers (highlighted by “Exactly Like You,” “Teach Me Tonight,” and “Sweet Georgia Brown”) feature Brown, Harris, and drummer Gerryck King playing soulful bop, while “Mistreated But Undefeated Blues” adds guitarist Emily Remler and the tenor of Red Holloway. An excellent effort.

Tracklist:
01. Exactly Like You (5:47)
02. Cry Me a River (5:47)
03. Teach Me Tonight (4:51)
04. Take the “A” Train (6:22)
05. Mistreated But Undefeated Blues (4:17)
06. That’s All (5:47)
07. Easy Does It (4:03)
08. Sweet Georgia Brown (8:46)

Personnel:
Ray Brown – bass
Gene Harris – piano
Gerryck King – drums
Red Holloway – tenor saxophone
Emily Remler – guitar

Recorded at Coast Recorders, San Francisco, California in August 1984.

Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Bop, Standards
Label: Concord Jazz
Year: 1985
Time: 45:39

* Original source was a DVD audio rip in 24bit-192kHz; and this share is a self-made imitation CD (converted to redbook standard, 16bit-44.1kHz); which can easily be burned as an “Audio-CD” to an empty media.

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + scans from “CD” version (cover+tray+disk)
Quality-2: mp3@320 + scans from “CD” version (cover+tray+disk)

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Count Basie – Basie Jam {Pablo} “Analogue Productions”


Review from ~cduniverse.com
This 1973 recording, the first of two Count Basie albums for the Fantasy label highlighting impromptu jam sessions, is something of a musical party. Heard here with longtime pals Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Harry “Sweets” Edison, and others, the Count performs a set of bluesy originals. Basie and company alight in a variety of musical dialogs-joyous and heartrending, playful and stalwart. As one might expect, each player rises to the occasion. And then some. There can be little doubt that Basie’s marvelous sensitivity as an accompanist catalyzes the fine soloing on this album. “One-Nighter” hints at least twice at how invigorating it can be to play with Basie. The first instance occurs when tenor-man Zoot Sims takes over from the organ, exacting a phrase of perfect, rounded beauty. A second occurs when Edison spreads a single recurring melodic figure across a full chorus, while Basie’s organ wheezes unobtrusively in the background. A soulful and foot-stomping album, “Basie Jam” accurately represents the late swing icon in his mature years.

Tracklist:
01. Doubling Blues (07:01)
02. Hanging Out (09:34)
03. Red Bank Blues (09:05)
04. One-Nighter (11:45)
05. Freeport Blues (11:44)

Personnel:
Count Basie – piano, organ
Irving Ashby – guitar
J.J. Johnson – trombone
Harry “Sweets” Edison – trumpet
Eddie Davis, Zoot Sims – tenor sax
Ray Brown – bass
Louie Bellson – drums

Recorded December 10, 1973

Label: Pablo – “Analogue Productions” Edition
Year: 1995
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Blues
Total Time: 49:09

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans (cover+inside+tray+CD)

Phineas Newborn, Jr. – Harlem Blues {Fantasy}[xrcd]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)
The superb trio (pianist Phineas Newborn, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Elvin Jones) had never played together before but it didn’t matter. They had little trouble finding common ground. The virtuosic pianist (still in peak form) leads the way on such pieces as his “Harlem Blues,” “Ray’s Idea” (composed decades earlier by Brown) and Horace Silver’s “Cookin’ at the Continental.”

Tracklist:
01. Harlem Blues (04:12)
02. Sweet and Lovely (07:38)
03. Little Girl Blue (06:15)
04. Ray’s Idea (05:21)
05. Stella By Starlight (06:00)
06. Tenderly (05:56)
07. Cookin’ at the Continental (03:08)

Personnel:
Phineas Newborn, Jr. – piano
Ray Brown – bass
Elvin Jones – drums

Recorded at Contemporary’s Studio, Los Angeles; February 12 and 13, 1969

Label: Fantasy – xrcd Edition
Year: 1999
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Hard Bop, Piano Trio
Total Time: 38:29

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork(cover+tray+inside+CD)

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Ben Webster meets Oscar Peterson {Verve} “Master Edition”


Review by Stephen Cook (allmusic.com)

Another fine Webster release on Verve that sees the tenor great once again backed by the deluxe Oscar Peterson Trio. In keeping with the high standard of their Soulville collaboration of two years prior, Webster and the trio — Peterson is joined by bassist Ray Brown and drummer Ed Thigpen — use this 1959 date to conduct a clinic in ballad playing. And while Soulville certainly ranks as one of the tenor saxophonist’s best discs, the Ben Webster Meets Oscar Peterson set gets even higher marks for its almost transcendent marriage of after-hours elegance and effortless mid-tempo swing — none of Webster’s boogie-woogie piano work to break up the mood here. Besides reinvigorating such lithe strollers as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (nice bass work by Brown here) and “This Can’t Be Love,” Webster and company achieve classic status for their interpretation of the Sinatra gem “In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning.” And to reassure Peterson fans worried about scant solo time for their hero, the pianist lays down a healthy number of extended runs, unobtrusively shadowing Webster’s vaporous tone and supple phrasing along the way. Not only a definite first-disc choice for Webster newcomers, but one of the jazz legend’s all-time great records.

Tracks:
01 – The Touch of Your Lips
02 – When Your Lover has Gone
03 – Bye-bye, Blackbird
04 – How Deep Is the Ocean?
05 – In the Wee, Small Hours of the Morning
06 – Sunday
07 – This Can’t Be Love

Personnel:
Ben Webster – tenor saxophone
Oscar Peterson – piano
Ray Brown – bass
Ed Thigpen – drums

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans

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Charlie Parker – Jam Session {Verve}


Review by “Jazzcat Stef” (amazon.com)

This is an absolutly marvellous example of what Jazz was and still should be (not because it’s more mainstream than bebop, in any case I love them both). The joy of playing with friends on common grounds, the standards and blues repertoire. I think I own everything Bird has ever played/released or at least I come really near. All the Dial, Savoy, Verve, Benedetti recordings, Bird’s Eyes, Live & Broadcasts, Blue Note concerts, recent discoveries, almost everything (more than 150 cds). This album cannot be considered a pure Bird album because he shared the scene with a lot of other sax stars which gave the session a different feeling from a lot of Bird’s records. I mean that this album is more Jazz “the Kansas City way” than bebop. It is a session more traditional than bebop. The only true beboppers are Bird, Kessel and Peterson (and Brown of course). The others, Webster, Hodges, Carter etc are more traditional than strictly bebop so the overall sound is more on that side of course. But it’s not a complaint, only an obvious consideration. The album is really fresh and entertaining, you can compar eit to a lot of JATP sessions in a sense. So it’s not a “revolutionary” album, not one that set a standard or that marked a change in Jazz history, nevertheless it’s essential in its way. It is a perect representation of what Jazz was more at Lester Young time than Bird time, but it’s very very good. It deserves 5 stars absolutly. Every player shined here and found his time to strecht out and show his bags of tricks fully. One of the highlights is the comping by Oscar Peterson swing machine which gave to the session a fabolous imprinting. The program is damn good. Two very long blues tunes, a very beautiful standard (“What is this thing” one of the standards I love the most) and a ballad medley. Fantastic! And even if Bird is playing more or less his usual cliches and nothing more, he’s still Bird! I love this album, for real. Buy it, you will love it for years and years too.

Tracks:
01 – Jam Blues
02 – What is This Thing Called Love
03 – Ballad Medley:
a) All the Things You Are
b) Dearly Beloved
c) The Nearness of You
d) I’ll Get By
e) Everything Happens to Me
f) The Man I Love
g) What’s New
h) Someone to Watch Over Me
i) Isn’t it Romantic?
04 – Funky Blues

Personnel:
Charlie Shavers, Benny Carter, Charlie Parker, Johnny Hodges – alto sax
Flip Phillips, Ben Webster – tenor sax
Oscar Peterson – piano
Barney Kessel – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
J.C. Heard – drums

Recorded July, 1952; Los Angeles.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Duke Ellington Quartet – Duke’s Big Four {Pablo}[xrcd]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

One of Duke Ellington’s finest small group sessions from his final decade was this frequently exciting quartet date with guitarist Joe Pass, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Louie Bellson. Ellington’s percussive style always sounded modern and he comes up with consistently strong solos on such numbers as “Love You Madly,” “The Hawk Talks” and especially “Cotton Tail,” easily keeping up with his younger sidemen. Highly recommended.

Tracks:
01 – Cotton Tail
02 – The Blues
03 – The Hawk Talks
04 – Prelude to a Kiss
05 – Love You Madly
06 – Just Squeeze Me (But Don’t Tease Me)
07 – Everything But You

Personnel:
Duke Ellington – piano
Joe Pass – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Louis Bellson – drums

Recorded in Los Angeles; January 8, 1973.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson – The Trio “Live from Chicago” {Verve}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

The Oscar Peterson Trio with bassist Ray Brown and drummer Ed Thigpen lacked the competitiveness of his earlier group with Brown and guitarist Herb Ellis, and the later daring of his solo performances, but the pianist was generally in peak form during this era. He sticks to standards on this live CD (a good example of the Trio’s playing), stretching out “Sometimes I’m Happy” creatively for over 11 minutes and uplifting such songs as “In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning,” “Chicago” and “The Night We Called It a Day.” Few surprises occur, but Peterson plays at such a consistently high level that one doesn’t mind.

Tracks:
01 – I’ve Never Been in Love Before
02 – In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning
03 – Chicago
04 – The Night We Called it a Day
05 – Sometimes I’m Happy
06 – Whisper Not
07 – Billy Boy

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Ray Brown – bass
Ed Thigpen – drums

Recorded September-October 1961 at the London House, Chicago.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork