McCoy Tyner Trio – Inception {impulse!} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Alexander Gelfand ~allmusic.com
Those familiar with the dense, percussive style that pianist McCoy Tyner has cultivated since the 1970s onwards may be surprised by what they hear on Inception. Like Reaching Fourth and Nights of Ballads and Blues, this album gives listeners the chance to hear what a very young Tyner sounded like outside the confines of the classic John Coltrane quartet of the early ’60s; it reveals a lyrical approach to jazz piano that seems a far cry from Tyner’s mature style. The choice of material is fairly evenly split between modal pieces like “Inception” and more harmonically involved tunes like “Speak Low,” and the pianist’s treatment of both demonstrates the extent to which his early work was rooted in bebop. Tyner had yet to develop the massive orchestral sound and highly distinctive vocabulary of modal licks that would mark his later style, and throughout this album he spins dizzyingly long and singing lines with an exquisitely light touch. The irresistible rush of forward momentum that he maintains on tracks like “Effendi” and “Blues for Gwen” is breathtaking, and there is an exuberant, almost athletic quality to much of his solo work. Bassist Art Davis and drummer Elvin Jones provide superb accompaniment throughout, and they lay a solid rhythmic foundation for Tyner’s sparkling melodic flights. The pianist’s penchant for drama, which asserts itself more strongly in his later work, is on brief display in the original ballad “Sunset”; his skills as an arranger, though evident on several tracks, are perhaps best illustrated by the intricate contrapuntal treatment of “There Is No Greater Love.”

Tracklist:
01. Inception (4:28)
02. There is No Greater Love (6:20)
03. Blues for Gwen (4:26)
04. Sunset (4:41)
05. Effendi (6:39)
06. Speak Low (6:22)

Personnel:
McCoy Tyner – piano
Art Davis – bass
Elvin Jones – drums

Recorded January 10, 1962

Genre: Jazz
Style: Post Bop, Piano Trio
Label: impulse! / Analogue Productions
Year: 2011
Time: 32:56

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + full scans
Quality-2: mp3@320 + full scans

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Hank Mobley – A Caddy for Daddy {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Hank Mobley was a perfect artist for Blue Note in the 1960s. A distinctive but not dominant soloist, Mobley was also a very talented writer whose compositions avoided the predictable yet could often be quite melodic and soulful; his tricky originals consistently inspired the young all-stars in Blue Note’s stable. For this CD, which is a straight reissue of a 1965 session, Mobley is joined by trumpeter Lee Morgan, trombonist Curtis Fuller, pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Bob Cranshaw, and drummer Billy Higgins (a typically remarkable Blue Note lineup) for the infectious title cut, three other lesser-known but superior originals, plus Wayne Shorter’s “Venus Di Mildew.” Recommended.

Tracks:
01 – A Caddy for Daddy
02 – The Morning After
03 – Venus Di Mildew
04 – Ace Deuce Trey
05 – 3rd Time Around

Personnel:
Lee Morgan – trumpet
Curtis Fuller – trombone
Hank Mobley – tenor sax
McCoy Tyner – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Billy Higgins – drums

Originally released in 1966 on Blue Note Records as BST-84230.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork