Oscar Peterson Trio – In Tokyo (Live at the Palace Hotel) {Columbia} “24bit remastering”


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

One of a handful of recordings that Oscar Peterson made for release exclusively in Japan, Last Trio: Oscar Peterson in Tokyo is a rare opportunity to hear the pianist with fellow Canadian Michel Donato on bass, plus Louis Hayes on drums. Peterson is the center of attention with his rhythm section mostly in a supporting role, seemingly as if they had not worked together extensively prior to playing at The Palace Hotel in Tokyo. Hayes had already recorded several albums with the pianist for MPS, though this seems to be one of only two recordings featuring Donato (the other being the obscure Australian CD Nightingale). Peterson does not disappoint, delivering a number of terrific performances, including a blazing “Strike Up the Band” a soulful if breezy take of Horace Silver’s “The Preacher,” and lyrical treatments of “What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life” and his own “Wheatland.” While this trio lacks the potential of groups that featured either Ray Brown or Niels-Henning ├śrsted Pedersen, it will please Peterson’s fans.

Tracks:
01 – The Good Life
02 – What am I Here For?
03 – I Hear Music
04 – What are You Doing the Rest of Your Life
05 – Strike Up the Band
06 – The More I See You
07 – Wheatland
08 – The Preacher
09 – Old Rockin’ Chair
10 – Blues Etude

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Michel Donato – bass
Louis Hayes – drums

Recorded live at The Palaca Hotel, Tokyo – May 27, 1972.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Barry Harris at the Jazz Workshop {Riverside}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Pianist Barry Harris’ second recording as a leader (he led a set for Argo in 1958) finds him at the age of 30 playing in the same boppish style he would have throughout his career. Teamed up with bassist Sam Jones and drummer Louis Hayes, this live CD reissue (which adds three alternate takes to the original LP program) is an excellent example of Harris’ playing. Highlights of the enthusiastic straight-ahead set (which includes three obscure but worthy originals by the pianist) include “Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby,” “Moose the Mooche” and “Woody’N You.”

Tracks:
01 – Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby (take 2)
02 – Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby (previously unissued-take 1)
03 – Curtain Call
04 – Star Eyes
05 – Moose the Mooche
06 – Lolita
07 – Morning Coffee
08 – Don’t Blame Me (take 2)
09 – Don’t Blame Me (previously unissued-take 1)
10 – Woody’n You (take 2)
11 – Woody’n You (previously unissued-take 1)

Personnel:
Barry Harris – piano
Sam Jones – bass
Louis Hayes – drums

Recorded live at The Jazz Workshop, San Francisco; May 15 and 16, 1960.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Ike Quebec – Blue and Sentimental {Blue Note} “Japan”


Review by Steve Huey (allmusic.com)

Ike Quebec’s 1961-1962 comeback albums for Blue Note were all pretty rewarding, but Blue and Sentimental is his signature statement of the bunch, a superbly sensuous blend of lusty blues swagger and achingly romantic ballads. True, there’s no shortage of that on Quebec’s other Blue Note dates, but Blue and Sentimental is the most exquisitely perfected. Quebec was a master of mood and atmosphere, and the well-paced program here sustains his smoky, late-night magic with the greatest consistency of tone. Part of the reason is that Quebec’s caressing tenor sound is given a sparer backing than usual, with no pianist among the quartet of guitarist Grant Green, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones. It’s no surprise that Green solos with tremendous taste and elegance (the two also teamed up on Green’s similarly excellent Born to Be Blue), and there are plenty of open spaces in the ensemble for Quebec to shine through. His rendition of the Count Basie-associated title cut is a classic, and the other standard on the original LP, “Don’t Take Your Love From Me,” is in a similarly melancholy vein. Green contributes a classic-style blues in “Blues for Charlie,” and Quebec’s two originals, “Minor Impulse” and “Like,” have more complex chord changes but swing low and easy. Through it all, Quebec remains the quintessential seducer, striking just the right balance between sophistication and earthiness, confidence and vulnerability, joy and longing. It’s enough to make Blue and Sentimental a quiet, sorely underrated masterpiece.

Tracks:
01 – Blue and Sentimental
02 – Minor Impulse
03 – Don’t Take Your Love from Me
04 – Blues for Charlie
05 – Like
06 – Count Every Star

Personnel:
Ike Quebec – tenor sax, piano
Grant Green – guitar
Sonny Clark – piano (6)
Paul Chambers – bass (1-5)
Sam Jones – bass (6)
Philly Joe Jones – drums (1-5)
Louis Hayes – drums (6)

Recorded December 16 and 23, 1961.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson – Blues Etude {PolyGram}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This CD reissue finds pianist Oscar Peterson at a transitional point in his career. Louis Hayes was the new drummer in his trio and, although veteran Ray Brown is on bass during the earlier of the two sessions, by 1966 he would depart after 15 years and be replaced by Sam Jones. However, the basic sound of the Oscar Peterson Trio remained unchanged (Peterson was the dominant voice anyway) and the personality of the group remained intact. Peterson contributed three originals (including the hard-swinging title cut) to this program and also sounds typically fine on “Let’s Fall in Love,” “The Shadow of Your Smile,” “If I Were a Bell,” and a definitive version of “Stella by Starlight.”

Tracks:
01 – Blues Etude
02 – Shelley’s World
03 – Let’s Fall in Love
04 – The Shadow of Your Smile
05 – If I Were a Bell
06 – Stella by Starlight
07 – Bossa Beguine
08 – L’Impossible
09 – I Know You Oh So Well

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Sam Jones, Ray Brown – bass
Louis Hayes – drums

Recorded on December 3, 1965 and May 4, 1966

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Grant Green – Born to Be Blue {Blue Note}


Review by Alex Henderson (allmusic.com)

Although Grant Green provided his share of groove-oriented soul-jazz and modal post-bop, his roots were hard bop, and it is in a bop-oriented setting that the guitarist excels on Born to Be Blue. Most of the material on this five-star album was recorded at Rudy Van Gelder’s New Jersey studio on December 11, 1961, when Green was joined by tenor titan Ike Quebec, pianist Sonny Clark, bassist Sam Jones, and drummer Louis Hayes. Tragically, Quebec was near the end of his life — the distinctive saxman died of lung cancer at the age of 44 on January 16, 1963 — but there is no evidence of Quebec’s declining health on Born to Be Blue. He was playing as authoritatively as ever well into 1962, and the saxman is in fine form on hard-swinging interpretations of “Someday My Prince Will Come” and Al Jolson’s “Back in Your Own Back Yard.” It’s interesting to hear Quebec playing bop, for his big, breathy tone was right out of swing and was greatly influenced by Coleman Hawkins and Ben Webster. Although Quebec and Green (who was 14 years younger) had very different musical backgrounds, they were always quite compatible musically. They clearly enjoyed a strong rapport on the uptempo selections as well as ballads like “My One and Only Love” and Mel Torme’s “Born to Be Blue.” Originally a vinyl LP, this album was reissued on CD in 1989, when Blue Note added an alternate take of the title song and a previously unreleased version of Charlie Parker’s “Cool Blues.”

Tracks:
01 – Someday My Prince Will Come
02 – Born to Be Blue
03 – Born to Be Blue (alternate take)
04 – If I Should Lose You
05 – Back in Your Own Back Yard
06 – My One and Only Love
07 – Count Every Star
08 – Cool Blues
09 – Outer Space

Personnel:
Grant Green – guitar
Ike Quebec – tenor sax
Sonny Clark – piano
Sam Jones – bass
Louis Hayes – drums

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey
on December 11, 1961 and March 1, 1962.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson – Reunion Blues {MPS}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Pianist Oscar Peterson joins up with his old friends, vibraphonist Milt Jackson and bassist Ray Brown, in addition to his drummer of the period, Louis Hayes, for a particularly enjoyable outing. After a throwaway version of the Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” the all-star quartet performs Jackson’s title cut, Benny Carter’s ballad “Dream of You,” and four standards. Although not up to the excitement of Peterson’s best Pablo recordings of the 1970s, this is an enjoyable album.

Tracks:
01 – Satisfaction
02 – Dream of You
03 – Someday My Prince will Come
04 – A Time for Love
05 – Reunion Blues
06 – When I Fall in Love
07 – Red Top

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Milt Jackson – vibraphone
Ray Brown – bass
Louis Hayes – drums

Recorded at MPS-Tonstudio, Villingen; 1972

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork