Jimmy Smith – Fourmost Return {Milestone}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)
Recorded during the same 1990 gig at Fat Tuesday’s as the earlier Fourmost CD, Fourmost Return features Jimmy Smith, Stanley Turrentine, Kenny Burrell, and Grady Tate in great form once again, so this is no compilation of lukewarm leftovers. The music includes a burning, up-tempo take of “Sonnymoon for Two” and a bluesy and lyrical interpretation of “Mood Indigo,” as well as an initially lounge-like “Laura” that gives way to a hot solo by Burrell. Smith also revives his popular “Back at the Chicken Shack” and adds a good-natured but rather hoarse vocal to the oldie “Ain’t She Sweet.” All the players are in top form and this release should appeal to fans of soul-jazz.

Tracklist:
01. Sonnymoon for Two (05:37)
02. Mood Indigo (06:15)
03. Ain’t She Sweet (03:32)
04. Back at the Chicken Shack (06:36)
05. Organ Grinder’s Swing (05:06)
06. Laura (10:49)
07. Blues for Stanley (10:25)

Personnel:
Jimmy Smith – organ, vocal on #3
Stanley Turrentine – tenor saxophone
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Grady Tate – drums

Recorded live at Fat Tuesday’s, New York City; November 16-17, 1990.

Label: Milestone
Year: 2001
Genre: Jazz
Style: Soul Jazz, Hard Bop
Total Time: 48:19

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Jimmy Smith – Fourmost {Milestone}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)
Organist Jimmy Smith has a reunion on this CD with his 30 plus-year associates tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine and guitarist Kenny Burrell along with drummer Grady Tate. Together they play spirited and creative versions of standards and blues. The highpoints include “Midnight Special,” a swinging “Main Stem,” Tate’s warm vocal on “My Funny Valentine” and a lengthy rendition of “Quiet Nights.” Suffice it to say that this all-star date reaches its potential and is easily recommended to fans of straightahead jazz.

Tracklist:
01. Midnight Special (06:58)
02. Main Stem (06:42)
03. Summertime (08:28)
04. Things Ain’t What They Used to Be (06:37)
05. Soulful Brothers (10:18)
06. My Funny Valentine (05:53)
07. Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars (10:50)

Personnel:
Jimmy Smith – organ
Stanley Turrentine – tenor sax
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Grady Tate – drums, vocal on “My Funny Valentine”

Recorded live at Fat Tuesday’s, New York City; November 16-17, 1990.

Label: Milestone
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Hard Bop, Soul Jazz
Total Time: 55:46

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Coleman Hawkins – In a Mellow Tone {Prestige}[OJC]


Review from “cduniverse.com”
Few jazz giants have been as important and as relevant for as long as the Bean, a revealing nickname; it’s apparently a contraction of “the best and only.” Hawkins received this appellation during his tenure with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. The saxophonist’s gruff yet mellifluous, smoky yet coarse tone influenced generations of musicians.

This compilation features music from Hawkins’ years with Prestige Records. Filled with many exciting and tranquil moments, IN A MELLOW TONE captures a great period in the saxophonist’s forty-plus year career. The album’s opener, “You Blew Out the Flame In My Heart” displays Hawkins’ ability to swing with a light buoyant feel, while ballads such as “I Want to Be Loved,” “Greensleeves,” “Then I’ll be Tired of You,” and “Until the Real Thing Comes Along” show the degree of delicacy and intimacy of which Hawkins was capable. Finally, the album’s title track brims with energy and verve, due in large part to Gus Johnson’s crisp drumming.

Tracklist:
01 – You Blew Out the Flame in My Heart
02 – I Want to Be Loved
03 – In a Mellow Tone
04 – Greensleeves
05 – Through for the Night
06 – Until the Real Thing Comes Along
07 – The Sweetest Sounds
08 – Then I’ll Be Tired of You
09 – Jammin’ in Swingville

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis – tenor sax
Hilton Jefferson – alto sax
Jimmy Hamilton – clarinet
Vic Dickenson, J.C. Higginbotham – trombone
Joe Thomas, Charlie Shavers, Joe Newman – trumpet
Tommy Flanagan, Red Garland, Ray Bryant – piano
Kenny Burrell, Tiny Grimes – guitar
Wendell Marshall, Doug Watkins, Ron Carter, George Duvivier, Major Jolley – bass
Osie Johnson, Charles “Specs” Wright, Gus Johnson, Eddie Locke, Bill English – drums

Recorded between November 7, 1958 – March 30, 1962;
at Hackensack, NJ (#2, 4, 5 and 6); and Englewood Cliffs, NJ (#1, 3, 7, 8 and 9)

Label: Prestige – OJC
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream Jazz, Saxophone

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Ernestine Anderson – My Kinda Swing {Mercury}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

Ernestine Anderson was 32 years old at the time of this 1960 session, not long before her career inexplicably fell into the doldrums. This album finds her in great form, supported by a cast of musicians including Clark Terry, Hank Jones, Yusef Lateef, Ernie Royal, Frank Rehak, and Kenny Burrell, with terrific arrangements by Ernie Wilkins. She achieves the perfect balance in her interpretation of “Trouble Is a Man,” a masterful ballad written by Alec Wilder, and she’s clearly in her element in the hard-rocking blues “See See Rider.” Terry’s striking trumpet almost provides a contrasting vocal alongside Anderson during “All My Life,” while her understated approach to a quick run through “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)” showcases Jones and Burrell. Lateef’s oboe adds to the exotic flavor of “Lazy Afternoon.”

Tracks:
01 – My Kinda Love
02 – Trouble is a Man
03 – See See Rider
04 – Moonlight in Vermont
05 – Land of Dreams
06 – Black Moonlight
07 – All My Life
08 – Mound Bayou
09 – I’ll Never Be the Same
10 – It Don’t Mean a Thing (if it Ain’t Got That Swing)
11 – Lazy Afternoon
12 – They Didn’t Believe Me

Personnel:
Ernestine Anderson – vocals, with Ernie Wilkins’s Orchestra including:
Ernie Royal, Clark Terry – trumpet
Frank Rehak – trombone
Yusef Lateef – tenor sax, flute, oboe
Tate Houston – baritone sax
Mac Ceppos – violin
Hank Jones – piano
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Art Davis – bass
Willie Rodriguez – percussion
Charlie Persip – drums
Ernie Wilkins – arranger & conductor

Recorded late 1960 in New York City.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans

Donald Byrd & Kenny Burrell – All Night Long {Prestige}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Two of guitarist Kenny Burrell’s best sessions from the 1950s were this release and its companion, All Day Long. Burrell is teamed with an impressive group of young all-stars, including trumpeter Donald Byrd, tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley, Jerome Richardson on flute and tenor, pianist Mal Waldron, bassist Doug Watkins, and drummer Art Taylor. In addition to the lengthy “All Night Long” and three group originals (two by Mobley and one from Waldron), the original LP program has been augmented by a medley of “Body and Soul” and “Tune Up” from the same session. Jam sessions such as this one are only as good as the solos; fortunately, all of the musicians sound quite inspired, making this an easily recommended set.

Tracks:
01 – All Night Long
02 – Boo-Lu
03 – Flickers
04 – Li’l Hankie
05 – Body & Soul
06 – Tune Up

Personnel:
Donald Byrd – trumpet
Hank Mobley – tenor saxophone
Jerome Richardson – flute, tenor saxophone
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Doug Watkins – bass
Art Taylor – drums

Recorded in Hackensack, NJ; December 28, 1956.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Kenny Burrell – Blue Muse {Concord}


Review by Rex Butters (allaboutjazz.com)

Since the ’50s, Kenny Burrell has contributed crucial titles to some of the most important jazz labels, including Blue Note, Verve, Columbia, and Muse. For his 96th album, Burrell sticks to what’s worked well for him over the past fifty years: some blues, some Ellington, some swing, and several ballads, all played with beautiful tone and exquisite taste. To keep things fresh, Burrell adds some unusual flavors to the stew: acoustic guitar and voice.
At the dawn of his lengthy career, Burrell sang solo on Detroit TV. He also sang on Weaver of Dreams (Columbia 1960) and the recent Lucky So and So (Concord 2001). While George Benson can continue to sleep undisturbed, Burrell generally acquits himself as a straightforward reader of lyrics on four of these tunes.
With drummer Sherman Ferguson and especially bassist Roberto Miranda lighting a fire under the swinging groove of “Mark I,” the set begins with classic Burrell, his effortless technical prowess and often-imitated tone intact. The ballad “My Friend Ray” pays tribute to the late Ray Brown, pianist Gerald Wiggins treating Burrell’s chords, octaves, and solos as another voice to showcase, sensitively dressing each measure to the sweet sounding guitar’s advantage. Miranda deftly dances through the arrangement without adding clutter.
“On the Wings of Spirit,” finds Herman Riley joining the proceedings on flute and Burrell playing a steel string acoustic in a Brazilian mode. “Then I Met You” returns Riley to breathy flute as Burrell sings a self-penned ode to his wife. While it can be argued that the sentiment and the vocal (and the synth string section) were better left at home, Burrell’s solo offers a glimpse of what could have been a more evocative instrumental.
“It’s No Time to be Blue,” a version of Kenny Dorham’s “Blue Bossa” with lyrics, works better. The emphasis remains on Burrell’s acoustic guitar, with the vocals basically stating the theme. “3/4 of the House” recalls Miles’ “All Blues” and happily steers the program away from a sentimental rut. Riley slathers soulful tenor all over the tune, pushing Burrell into familiar blues territory. Monk’s “‘Round Midnight” brings the tempo back down, but features Burrell’s best vocal of the collection, although the tune’s angularity is all ironed out.
Now celebrating his fruitful twenty-five year association with UCLA, his reputation untouchable, his place in jazz history assured (he was, afterall, Duke Ellington’s favorite guitarist), and with over two hundred album appearances in addition to his nearly hundred as leader, Burrell will hardly live or die by Blue Muse. But this self-produced effort seems to argue in favor of an objective sympathetic hand to help steer number ninety-seven.

Tracks:
01 – Mark I
02 – My Friend Ray
03 – On Wings of the Spirit
04 – Then I Met You
05 – It’s No Time to be Blue
06 – Blue in Green
07 – Blue Muse
08 – Solitude
09 – 3/4 of the House
10 – ‘Round Midnight
11 – Habiba
12 – Blue Guitar Blues

Personnel:
Kenny Burrell – acoustic and electric guitars, vocals
Tom Ranier – piano and keyboards
Gerald Wiggins – piano
Herman Riley – saxophone, flute
Roberto Miranda – bass
Sherman Ferguson – drums

Recorded December 2002, Castle Oak Studios, Calabasas, CA

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Jimmy Smith – Organ Grinder Swing {Verve} “Japan”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Most of organist Jimmy Smith’s recordings for Verve during the mid-to-late ’60s were with big bands, making this trio outing with guitarist Kenny Burrell and drummer Grady Tate a special treat. This CD reissue is a throwback to Smith’s Blue Note sets (which had concluded two years earlier) and gives the organists the opportunity to stretch out on three blues and three standards. This release shows that, even with all of his commercial success during the period, Jimmy Smith was always a masterful jazz player.

Tracks:
01 – The Organ Grinder’s Swing
02 – Oh, No, Babe
03 – Blues for J
04 – Greensleeves
05 – I’ll Close My Eyes
06 – Satin Doll

Personnel:
Jimmy Smith – organ
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Grady Tate – drums

Recorded at Van Gelder Studios, ENglewood Cliffs, New Jersey on June 14 and 15, 1965.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Chet Baker – Chet {Riverside}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

The shifting personnel on this excellent CD find Chet Baker joined by such players as baritonist Pepper Adams, flutist Herbie Mann, pianist Bill Evans, and guitarist Kenny Burrell. This reissue of an LP adds one selection (“Early Morning Mood”) formerly only available on a sampler. Fine straight-ahead music that comes from the tail end of the West Coast jazz era.

Tracks:
01 – Alone Together
02 – How High The Moon
03 – It Never Entered My Mind
04 – ‘Tis Autumn
05 – If You Could See Me Now
06 – September Song
07 – You’d Be So Nice To Come Home To
08 – Time On My Hands (You In My Arms)
09 – You and the Night and the Music
10 – Early Morning Mood

Personnel:
Chet Baker – trumpet
Pepper Adams – baritone sax
Herbie Mann – flute
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Bill Evans – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Connie Kay, Philly Joe Jones – drums

Recorded in New York City; December 30, 1958 and January 19, 1959

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Ike Quebec – Bossa Nova, Soul Samba {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Scott Yanow & Thom Jurek (allmusic.com)

This was veteran tenor saxophonist Ike Quebec’s final recording as a leader. It was cut in October 1962 and produced by Alfred Lion a little more than three months before the saxophonist’s death. Bossa Nova Soul Samba was recorded and released during the bossa nova craze, as Brazilian music was first brought to the attention of pop listeners via Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd’s smash hit with Tom Jobim’s “Desafinado,” on their Jazz Samba record for Verve in February. After that, seemingly everyone was making a bossa nova record. Quebec’s effort is a bit unusual in that none of the musicians (guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist Wendell Marshall, drummer Willie Bobo, and percussionist Garvin Masseaux) was associated with Brazilian (as opposed to Afro-Cuban) jazz before this, and that there isn’t a single tune written by Jobim on the set. Quebec emphasizes warm, long tones (reminiscent of Coleman Hawkins in a romantic fashion), and his sidemen play light and appealing but nonetheless authoritative bossa rhythms. Standout tracks here include Burrell’s own “Loie,” which opens the disc, “Goin’ Home,” based on a tune by classical composer Antonin Dvorák and arranged by Quebec — he does the same with “Liebestraum” two tunes later — and the stunning “Favela,” by the crack composing team of Joraci Camargo and Heckel Tavares. The result is high-quality melodic Brazilian dance music with Burrell shining in particular. The pleasing program concludes with three previously unissued alternate takes on the numerous CD reissues by Blue Note.

Tracks:
01 – Loie
02 – Lloro tu Despedida
03 – Goin’ Home
04 – Me’n You
05 – Liebestraum
06 – Shu Shu
07 – Blue Samba
08 – Favela
09 – Linda Flor
10 – Loie (alternate)
11 – Shu Shu (alternate)
12 – Favela (alternate)

Personnel:
Ike Quebec – tenor sax
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Wendell Marshall – bass
Willie Bobo – drums
Garvin Masseaux – chekere

Originally released in 1962

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Wynton Kelly – Piano {Riverside}[xrcd]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

With the exception of an album for Blue Note in 1951, this was pianist Wynton Kelly’s first opportunity to record as a leader. At the time he was still a relative unknown but would soon get a certain amount of fame as Miles Davis’ favorite accompanist. With guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist Paul Chambers, and (on three of the seven selections) drummer Philly Joe Jones, Kelly performs four jazz standards, Oscar Brown, Jr.’s “Strong Man” and two of his originals. Kelly became a major influence on pianists of the ’60s and ’70s and one can hear the genesis of many other players in these swinging performances. The CD reissue adds an alternate take of “Dark Eyes” to the original program.

Tracks:
01 – Whisper Not
02 – Action
03 – Dark Eyes
04 – Strong Man
05 – Ill Wind
06 – Don’t Explain
07 – You Can’t Get Away
08 – Dark Eyes (take 2)

Personnel:
Wynton Kelly – piano
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Paul Chambers – bass
Philly Joe Jones – drums

Recorded at Metropolitan Sound Studios, New York City; January, 1958

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Stan Getz Quartet feat. Astrud Gilberto – Getz Au Go Go {Verve} “Originals”


Review by Lindsay Planer (allmusic.com)
Although the name Stan Getz (tenor sax) was initially synonymous with the West Coast cool scene during the mid-to-late 1950s, he likewise became a key component in the Bossa Nova craze of the early 1960s. Along with Astrud Gilberto (vocals), Getz scored a genre-defining hit with the “Girl From Ipanema,” extracted from the equally lauded Getz/Gilberto (1963). While that platter primarily consists of duets between Getz and João Gilberto (guitar/vocals), it was truly serendipity that teamed Getz with João’s wife Astrud, who claims to have never sung a note outside of her own home prior to the session that launched her career. Getz Au Go Go Featuring Astrud Gilberto (1964) was the second-to-last album that he would issue during his self-proclaimed “Bossa Nova Era” — the final being Getz/Gilberto #2 [live] (1964) concert title from Carnegie Hall. In many ways, that is a logical successor to this one, as both include the “New Stan Getz Quartet.” The band features a young Gary Burton (vibraphone), Kenny Burrell (guitar), Gene Cherico (bass), and Joe Hunt (drums). As is typical with jazz, there are a few personnel substitutions, with Helcio Milito (drums) and Chuck Israels (bass), respectively, filling in on nearly half the effort. As the name of the disc intimates, this recording hails from the venerable Greenwich Village venue, the Café Au Go Go, in mid-August of 1964 — two months after “Girl From Ipanema” became a Top Five pop single. However, the focus of Getz Au Go Go steers away from the Brazilian flavored fare, bringing Astrud Gilberto into the realm of a decidedly more North American style. That said, there are a few Antonio Carlos Jobim compositions — “Corcovado (Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars)” and “One Note Samba” — both of which would be considered as jazz standards in years to follow — as well as the lesser-circulated “Eu E Voce.” Getz and crew gather behind Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein’s “It Might as Well Be Spring,” and the scintillating instrumental “Summertime,” from Porgy & Bess. Other equally engaging cuts include affective vocal readings of “Only Trust Your Heart,” and the diminutive, yet catchy “Telephone Song.” There is also some great interaction between Getz and Burton on “Here’s to That Rainy Day.” Getz Au Go Go is highly recommended for all dimensions of jazz enthusiasts.

Tracklist:
01 – Corcovado (Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars) 02:52
02 – It Might as Well Be Spring 04:28
03 – Eu E Voce (Me and You) 02:33
04 – Summertime 08:12
05 – 6-Nix-Pix-Flix 01:06
06 – Only Trust Your Heart 04:42
07 – The Singing Song 03:47
08 – The Telephone Song 01:58
09 – One Note Samba 03:20
10 – Here’s That Rainy Day 06:16

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor sax and leader
Astrud Gilberto – vocalist
Gary Burton – vibes
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Gene Cherico, Chuck Israels – bass
Joe Hunt, Helcio Milito – drums

Tracks 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 recorded at Cafe Au Go Go, Greenwich Village, N.Y.C.; May 22, 1964
Tracks 1, 2, 3, 8 recorded at Carnegie Hall, N.Y.C.; October 9, 1964

Label: Verve
Year: 2007
Genre: Jazz
Style: Bossa Nova, Cool
Total Time: 39:13

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork