Coleman Hawkins – In a Mellow Tone {Prestige}[OJC]


Review from “cduniverse.com”
Few jazz giants have been as important and as relevant for as long as the Bean, a revealing nickname; it’s apparently a contraction of “the best and only.” Hawkins received this appellation during his tenure with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. The saxophonist’s gruff yet mellifluous, smoky yet coarse tone influenced generations of musicians.

This compilation features music from Hawkins’ years with Prestige Records. Filled with many exciting and tranquil moments, IN A MELLOW TONE captures a great period in the saxophonist’s forty-plus year career. The album’s opener, “You Blew Out the Flame In My Heart” displays Hawkins’ ability to swing with a light buoyant feel, while ballads such as “I Want to Be Loved,” “Greensleeves,” “Then I’ll be Tired of You,” and “Until the Real Thing Comes Along” show the degree of delicacy and intimacy of which Hawkins was capable. Finally, the album’s title track brims with energy and verve, due in large part to Gus Johnson’s crisp drumming.

Tracklist:
01 – You Blew Out the Flame in My Heart
02 – I Want to Be Loved
03 – In a Mellow Tone
04 – Greensleeves
05 – Through for the Night
06 – Until the Real Thing Comes Along
07 – The Sweetest Sounds
08 – Then I’ll Be Tired of You
09 – Jammin’ in Swingville

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis – tenor sax
Hilton Jefferson – alto sax
Jimmy Hamilton – clarinet
Vic Dickenson, J.C. Higginbotham – trombone
Joe Thomas, Charlie Shavers, Joe Newman – trumpet
Tommy Flanagan, Red Garland, Ray Bryant – piano
Kenny Burrell, Tiny Grimes – guitar
Wendell Marshall, Doug Watkins, Ron Carter, George Duvivier, Major Jolley – bass
Osie Johnson, Charles “Specs” Wright, Gus Johnson, Eddie Locke, Bill English – drums

Recorded between November 7, 1958 – March 30, 1962;
at Hackensack, NJ (#2, 4, 5 and 6); and Englewood Cliffs, NJ (#1, 3, 7, 8 and 9)

Label: Prestige – OJC
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream Jazz, Saxophone

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Jimmy Smith & Wes Montgomery – Further Adventures of Jimmy & Wes {Verve} ”Japan”


Review by Richard S. Ginell (allmusic.com)

Further Adventures of Jimmy and Wes picks up where Dynamic Duo left off, digging a little further into the one-time-only Wes Montgomery/Jimmy Smith sessions and coming up with more fine music — mellower in general than Dynamic Duo but first-class nonetheless. Unlike most of the studio sessions from this time, Montgomery gets plenty of room for his single-string work as well as his famous octaves, and both techniques find him in full, mature bloom, needing fewer notes in which to say more (Smith, of course, is precisely the opposite). All but one of the tracks on the original LP find Smith and Montgomery interacting only with themselves, the drums of Grady Tate, and the congas of Ray Barretto; Roger Miller’s “King of the Road” (not often covered by jazzers) and Montgomery’s “O.G.D.” (later known as “Road Song”) come off best. Oliver Nelson’s big band makes a sole appearance with a swaggering chart of “Milestones.” Though Dynamic Duo is probably the priority purchase by a hairsbreadth margin, you’ll need to have both that album and Further Adventures eventually.

Tracks:
01 – King of the Road
02 – Maybe September
03 – OGD
04 – Call Me
05 – Milestones
06 – Mellow Mood

Personnel:
Jimmy Smith – organ
Wes Montgomery – guitar
Grady Tate – drums
Richard Davis – bass
Ray Barretto – percussion

Bob Ashton, Danny Bank, Jerry Dodgion, Jerome Richardson, Phil Woods – woodwinds
Jimmy Maxwell, Joe Newman, Ernie Royal, Clark Terry – trumpets
Jimmy Cleveland, Quentin Jackson, Melba Liston – trombones
Tony Studd – bass trombone

Recorded on September 21 and 28, 1966
Year: 2004

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

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