Joe Henderson – Relaxin’ at Camarillo {Contemporary}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Originally on Contemporary, this CD reissue teams the great tenor Joe Henderson with pianist Chick Corea, either Tony Dumas or Richard Davis on bass, and Peter Erskine or Tony Williams on drums. The repertoire includes two songs by Corea, Henderson’s “Y Todavia la Quiero,” the standard ballad “My One and Only Love,” and Charlie Parker’s “Relaxin’ at Camarillo.” This informal session has plenty of fine solos from the two principals and is recommended to fans of advanced hard bop.

Tracks:
01 – Y Todavia La Quiero
02 – My One and Only Love
03 – Crimson Lake
04 – Yes, My Dear
05 – Relaxin’ at Camarillo

Personnel:
Joe Henderson – tenor saxophone
Chick Corea – piano
Tony Dumas, Richard Davis – bass
Peter Erskine, Tony Williams – drums

Recorded at Contemporary Record Studio, Los Angeles; August 20 and December 29, 1979.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

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Horace Silver – Cape Verdean Blues {Blue Note}[xrcd]


Review by Steve Huey (allmusic.com)

After the success of Song for My Father and its hit title cut, Horace Silver was moved to pay further tribute to his dad, not to mention connect with some of his roots. Silver’s father was born in the island nation of Cape Verde (near West Africa) before emigrating to the United States, and that’s the inspiration behind The Cape Verdean Blues. Not all of the tracks are directly influenced by the music of Cape Verde (though some do incorporate Silver’s taste for light exoticism); however, there’s a spirit of adventure that pervades the entire album, a sense of exploration that wouldn’t have been quite the same with Silver’s quintet of old. On average, the tracks are longer than usual, and the lineup — featuring tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson (a holdover from the Song for My Father sessions) and trumpeter Woody Shaw — is one of the most modernist-leaning Silver ever recorded with. They push Silver into more advanced territory than he was normally accustomed to working, with mild dissonances and (especially in Henderson’s case) a rawer edge to the playing. What’s more, bop trombone legend J.J. Johnson appears on half of the six tracks, and Silver sounds excited to finally work with a collaborator he’d been pursuing for some time. Johnson ably handles some of the album’s most challenging material, like the moody, swelling “Bonita” and the complex, up-tempo rhythms of “Nutville.” Most interesting, though, is the lilting title track, which conjures the flavor of the islands with a blend of Latin-tinged rhythms and calypso melodies that nonetheless don’t sound quite Caribbean in origin. Also noteworthy are “The African Queen,” with its blend of emotional power and drifting hints of freedom, and “Pretty Eyes,” Silver’s first original waltz. Yet another worthwhile Silver album.

Tracks:
01 – The Cape Verdean Blues
02 – The African Queen
03 – Pretty Eyes
04 – Nutville
05 – Bonita
06 – Mo’ Joe

Personnel:
Woody Shaw – trumpet
J. J. Johnson – trombone
Joe Henderson – tenor sax
Horace Silver – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Roger Humphries – drums

Recorded 1 & 25, 1965, at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Lee Morgan – The Sidewinder {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Stacia Proefrock (allmusic.com)

Carried by its almost impossibly infectious eponymous opening track, The Sidewinder helped foreshadow the sounds of boogaloo and soul-jazz with its healthy R&B influence and Latin tinge. While the rest of the album retreats to a more conventional hard bop sound, Morgan’s compositions are forward-thinking and universally solid. Only 25 at the time of its release, Morgan was accomplished (and perhaps cocky) enough to speak of mentoring the great Joe Henderson, who at 26 was just beginning to play dates with Blue Note after getting out of the military. Henderson makes a major contribution to the album, especially on “Totem Pole,” where his solos showed off his singular style, threatening to upstage Morgan, who is also fairly impressive here. Barry Harris, Bob Cranshaw, and Billy Higgins are all in good form throughout the album as well, and the group works together seamlessly to create an album that crackles with energy while maintaining a stylish flow.

Tracks:
01 – The Sidewinder
02 – Totem Pole
03 – Gary’s Notebook
04 – Boy, What a Night
05 – Hocus-Pocus
06 – Totem Pole (alternate)

Personnel:
Lee Morgan – trumpet
Joe Henderson – tenor sax
Barry Harris – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Billy Higgins – drums

Originally released in 1964 on Blue Note as BST-84157

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork