Hank Jones, Christian McBride, Jimmy Cobb – West of 5th {Chesky}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

Veteran pianist Hank Jones is hardly slowing down at the age of 87, as heard on this beautifully recorded session in early 2006. With drummer Jimmy Cobb (who sticks to brushes) and Christian McBride rounding out his potent trio, Jones keeps old warhorses like “On Green Dolphin Street” fresh, giving ample space to his partner and adding a humorous detour into Billy Strayhorn’s “Rain Check.” Other highlights include his elegant treatment of his late brother Thad’s timeless ballad “A Child Is Born” and a hard driving take of Charlie Parker’s “Confirmation.” McBride shows depth beyond his years with strong accompaniment and swinging solos. This Hybrid Super Audio CD, recorded without any gimmickry such as remixing or compression, enables the listener to enjoy these intimate performances as if sitting in the studio with the players. Highly recommended!

Tracks:
01 – On Green Dolphin Street
02 – Mr. Walker
03 – Speak Low
04 – A Child is Born
05 – If I Were a Bell
06 – Billie’s Bounce
07 – Lotus Blossom
08 – Confirmation
09 – We’ll Be Together Again
10 – Stella by Starlight
11 – Eleanor

Personnel:
Hank Jones – piano
Christian McBride – bass
Jimmy Cobb – drums

Recorded January 29, 2006 at St.Peter’s Episcopal Church, New York City.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Advertisements

Paul Chambers – Go [2CD] {VeeJay}


Review by Michael G. Nastos (allmusic.com)

The first of two Vee Jay label dates by the acclaimed modern jazz bassist Paul Chambers is a fine exercise in hard bop, split between showcasing his compositions and famous standards. Alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley and trumpeter Freddie Hubbard are on the front line, perhaps for the only time in their storied careers, and work well for the most part. Pianist Wynton Kelly and either drummers Philly Joe Jones or Jimmy Cobb complete the quintets. The advantage in buying this reissue is that the second CD is comprised exclusively of outtakes from the originally issued tracks, and many of them have extended solos. Of the covers, “There Is No Greater Love” features a chuckling and cajoling Adderley, very happy for the fortune smiling on him, while “Just Friends” has the two horns playing this chestnut pretty much straight, with counterpointed stop-start techniques chirping at the rhythm section, and a young Hubbard offering his best solo. “I Got Rhythm” brings Cobb to the team, as a modal base from Kelly and Chambers buoys the wailing horns. Of the originals, Hubbard and Adderley sound mismatched on the 6/8 to 3/4 calypso-swing “Julie Ann,” where their harmonics don’t quite synch up. Their teamwork pays off royally during “I Heard That” and the classic hard bopper with Cobb “Ease It,” where the tempo persists, but the horns grow quieter and quieter in mezzo piano range to near nothingness — the epitome of cool. There’s another classic here, as “Awful Mean” is emotionally neither, but instead cures Adderley’s brief once-through melody statement into a vintage shuffle. The alternate take of this one is two-and-a-half minutes longer. “I Heard That” is called a “remake” though the original is just fine, and the second “remake” of the ballad “Dear Ann” (one of three attempts included) extends Chambers on his arco bowed bass melody, both pieces adding a ramped uptempo. This recording and 1st Bassman offer different aspects of Chambers as a leader, with the latter album having him take on more responsibility as a lead melodicist. After having played with the game changing bands of Miles Davis and John Coltrane, Chambers died far too young ten years hence in January of 1969, but left behind a memorable 15-year legacy, well represented by this recording where he was in his early prime.

Tracks – Disc One (Master Takes):
01 – Awful Mean
02 – Julie Ann
03 – There is No Greater Love
04 – I Heard That
05 – Dear Ann
06 – Shades of Blue
07 – Just Friends
08 – Ease It
09 – I Got Rhythm

Tracks – Disc Two (Alternate Takes):
01 – Awful Mean (take 4)
02 – I Heard That (remake take 1)
03 – I Heard That (take-8)
04 – Dear Ann (remake take 2)
05 – Dear Ann (take 3)
06 – Just Friends (take 6)
07 – I Got Rhythm (take 2)

Personnel:
Freddie Hubbard – trumpet
Cannonball Adderley – alto sax
Wynton Kelly – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Philly Joe Jones, Jimmy Cobb – drums

Recorded in New York City, February 2 and 3, 1959

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Wes Montgomery – Boss Guitar {Riverside}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Guitarist Wes Montgomery’s string of brilliant straight-ahead jazz recordings for the Riverside label was near its end when he recorded this trio outing with organist Melvin Rhyne and drummer Jimmy Cobb. The music swings hard and is highlighted by “Besame Mucho,” “Days of Wine and Roses,” “Canadian Sunset” and “The Breeze and I.” Enjoyable if not essential.

Tracks:
01 – Besame Mucho
02 – Besame Mucho (take 2)
03 – Dearly Beloved
04 – Days of Wine and Roses
05 – The Trick Bag
06 – Canadian Sunset
07 – Fried Pies
08 – Fried Pies (take 1)
09 – The Breeze and I
10 – For Heaven’s Sake

Personnel:
Wes Montgomery – guitar
Mel Rhyne – organ
Jimmy Cobb – drums

Recorded in New York City; April 22, 1963.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Miles Davis – Sketches of Spain [2CD]{Columbia} “Legacy Edition”


Review by Thom Jurek (allmusic.com)

More than likely, the serious Miles Davis fan has already bought Sketches of Spain in numerous editions before, from its original CD issue to two different remasters — and some have purchased it as part of the Miles Davis & Gil Evans: The Complete Columbia Studio Recordings box set as well. This 50th Anniversary Legacy Edition will more than likely be either for the serious Miles collector, or for a newcomer to the recordings of Davis and Evans. Since the single-CD issue of Sketches of Spain is still available, it remains to be seen who this 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition set — which contains no unreleased music — will appeal to; but it is a handsome issue and does contain a couple of nice bonuses to make it attractive. Along with the original album is a 70-minute bonus disc filled with alternate takes and extra tracks. There are four different takes of “Concerto de Arjanuez (Adagio),” including a two-part, alternate take version that lasts in total about 20 minutes; a stellar live version which is the only one that took place, and a brief alternate ending. In addition to other alternates of album pieces are “Maids of Cadiz,” which showcases the first Spanish composition that Evans adapted for Miles, and “Teo,” from the Someday My Prince Will Come sessions. It was included because of its symbiotic relationship to “Solea,” on Sketches of Spain. Also included on the bonus disc is a large .pdf file that is in essence a digital booklet with rare photos, press clippings, and previously unpublished documents related to the recordings sessions for the album. This version also comes with a new liner essay by Gunther Schuller. Again, the more casual Miles listener, and even the purchaser of his classic albums, may hesitate, but for the more serious jazz aficionado, it is somewhat revelatory to hear the bonus material prepared and sequenced in this context; and the extra digital booklet — given the attractive price of the set — makes it tough to resist.

Tracks – Disc One:
01 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)
02 – Will O’ the Wisp
03 – The Pan Piper
04 – Saeta
05 – Solea
06 – Song of Our Country

Tracks – Disc Two:
01 – Maids of Cadiz
02 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_rehearsal take, incomplete, w/o
03 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_alternate take, part one
04 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_alternate take, part two
05 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_alternate ending
06 – The Pan Piper (take 1)
07 – Song of Our Country_take 9, w/o intro
08 – Song of Our Country_take 14, slower tempo, w/o intro
09 – Saeta (full version of master)
10 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_live
11 – Teo

Personnel:
Miles Davis – fluegelhorn, trumpet
Gil Evans – arranger, conductor
Paul Chambers – bass
Jimmy Cobb, Art Taylor – drums
Elvin Jones – percussion
etc.

Recorded on May 6 & 27, 1957 and November 20, 1959 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, NYC

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Hank Jones (Great Jazz Trio with Strings) – N.Y. Sophisticate “A Tribute to Duke Ellington” {DENON}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

Hank Jones is one of the most gifted jazz pianists of the second half of the 20th century, and this salute to Duke Ellington is only slightly blemished by the sometimes overbearing string arrangements by Masahiko Satoh. His trio, with bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Jimmy Cobb, sticks to familiar selections from the vast Ellington songbook, with Jones occasionally switching to a Fender Rhodes electric piano or celeste. Happily the strings are omitted from cookers such as “C Jam Blues” and “Take the ‘A’ Train.” Worth searching for.

Tracks:
01 – In a Sentimental Mood
02 – C Jam Blues
03 – Mood Indigo
04 – Satin Doll
05 – Lush Life
06 – Sophisticated Lady
07 – Take The “A” Train
08 – I Got it Bad (and That Ain’t Good)
09 – Caravan
10 – Solitude

Personnel:
Hank Jones – piano
Eddie Gomez – bass
Jimmy Cobb – drums
etc

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Miles Davis – Kind of Blue “50th Anniversary Collector’s Edition” [2CD] {Columbia}


~wikipedia.org
Kind of Blue is a studio album by American jazz musician Miles Davis, released August 17, 1959, on Columbia Records in the United States. Recording sessions for the album took place at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio in New York City on March 2 and April 22, 1959. The sessions featured Davis’s ensemble sextet, which consisted of pianists Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly, drummer Jimmy Cobb, bassist Paul Chambers, and saxophonists John Coltrane and Julian “Cannonball” Adderley. After the inclusion of Bill Evans into his sextet, Davis followed up on the modal experimentations of Milestones (1958) and 1958 Miles (1958) by basing the album entirely on modality, in contrast to his earlier work with the hard bop style of jazz.

Though precise figures have been disputed, Kind of Blue has been cited by many music writers not only as Davis’s best-selling album, but as the best-selling jazz record of all time. On October 7, 2008, it was certified quadruple platinum in sales by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). It has been regarded by many critics as the greatest jazz album of all time and Davis’s masterpiece. The album’s influence on music, including jazz, rock, and classical music, has led music writers to acknowledge it as one of the most influential albums of all time. In 2002, it was one of fifty recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. In 2003, the album was ranked number 12 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine ~allmusic.com
Kind of Blue isn’t merely an artistic highlight for Miles Davis, it’s an album that towers above its peers, a record generally considered as the definitive jazz album, a universally acknowledged standard of excellence. Why does Kind of Blue posses such a mystique? Perhaps because this music never flaunts its genius. It lures listeners in with the slow, luxurious bassline and gentle piano chords of “So What.” From that moment on, the record never really changes pace — each tune has a similar relaxed feel, as the music flows easily. Yet Kind of Blue is more than easy listening. It’s the pinnacle of modal jazz — tonality and solos build from the overall key, not chord changes, giving the music a subtly shifting quality. All of this doesn’t quite explain why seasoned jazz fans return to this record even after they’ve memorized every nuance. They return because this is an exceptional band — Miles, Coltrane, Bill Evans, Cannonball Adderley, Paul Chambers, Jimmy Cobb — one of the greatest in history, playing at the peak of its power. As Evans said in the original liner notes for the record, the band did not play through any of these pieces prior to recording. Davis laid out the themes before the tape rolled, and then the band improvised. The end results were wondrous and still crackle with vitality. Kind of Blue works on many different levels. It can be played as background music, yet it amply rewards close listening. It is advanced music that is extraordinarily enjoyable. It may be a stretch to say that if you don’t like Kind of Blue, you don’t like jazz — but it’s hard to imagine it as anything other than a cornerstone of any jazz collection. [Legacy’s greatly expanded 50th Anniversary Collector’s Edition was issued in 2008.]

Tracklist, disc one:
01. So What (9:25)
02. Freddie Freeloader (9:49)
03. Blue in Green (5:38)
04. All Blues (11:36)
05. Flamenco Sketches (9:26)
06. Flamenco Sketches (alternate take) (9:34)
07. Freddie Freeloader – studio sequence 1 (0:53)
08. Freddie Freeloader – false start (1:28)
09. Freddie Freeloader – studio sequence 2 (1:31)
10. So What – studio sequence 1 (1:56)
11. So What – studio sequence 2 (0:14)
12. Blue in Green – studio sequence (1:59)
13. Flamenco Sketches – studio sequence 1 (0:45)
14. Flamenco Sketches – studio sequence 2 (1:12)
15. All Blues – studio sequence (0:19)

Tracklist, disc two:
01. On Green Dolphin Street (9:50)
02. Fran-Dance (5:50)
03. Stella by Starlight (4:47)
04. Love for Sale (11:49)
05. Fran-Dance (alternate take) (5:54)
06. So What (previously released in unauthorized form) (17:29)

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet
Cannonball Adderley – alto saxophone
John Coltrane – tenor saxophone
Wynton Kelly, Bill Evans – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Jimmy Cobb – drums

Recorded May 26, 1958 – Apr 9, 1960 at 30th Street Studio; New York
Produced by Teo Macero and Irving Townsend

Genre: Jazz
Style: Hard Bop, Post Bop
Label: Columbia – 50th Anniversary Collector’s Edition
Year: 2008
Time: 65:44 + 55:39

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + full artwork
Quality-2: mp3@320 + full artwork

John Coltrane – Standard Coltrane {Prestige}[OJC]


Review by Steve Leggett (allmusic.com)

John Coltrane had yet to move into his modal post-bop phase in 1958 when he recorded a session for Prestige Records on July 11 with trumpeter/fl├╝gelhornist Wilbur Harden, pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Jimmy Cobb, the results of which were issued in 1962 as Standard Coltrane. His groundbreaking modal work with Miles Davis on Kind of Blue was still a few months into the future, which makes this set more historical than vital or transitional, although it’s pleasant enough, featuring Coltrane on several standards, including a ten-plus-minute version of “Invitation.” Other Coltrane material from this 1958 Prestige era ended up on the albums Stardust (1963) and Bahia (1965), and all of it, including these four tracks, has been collected on The Stardust Session from Prestige Records, which is probably the way to go.

Tracks:
01 – Don’t Take Your Love from Me
02 – I’ll Get By (As Long as I Have You)
03 – Spring is Here
04 – Invitation

Personnel:
John Coltrane – tenor sax
Wilbur Harden – trumpet
Red Garland – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Jimmy Cobb – drums

Recorded in Hackensack, NJ; July 11, 1958.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork