Bill Evans with Philly Joe Jones – Green Dolphin Street {Riverside}[xrcd]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This obscure Bill Evans trio set (with bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Philly Joe Jones) went unissued until the mid-’70s when the pianist decided that it was worth releasing as a fine example of bassist Chambers’ work. Very much a spontaneous set (recorded after the rhythm section made part of a record accompanying trumpeter Chet Baker), the group runs through a few standards such as “You and the Night and the Music,” “Green Dolphin Street,” and two versions of “Woody ‘N You.” Although lacking the magic of Evans’ regular bands, this CD reissue has its strong moments and the pianist’s fans will be interested in getting the early sampling of his work. A special bonus is the rare first take of “All of You” from the legendary Village Vanguard engagement by the 1961 Evans Trio (with bassist Scott LaFaro and drummer Paul Motian).

Tracks:
01 – You and the Night and the Music
02 – My Heart Stood Still
03 – Green Dolphin Street
04 – How am I to Know?
05 – Woody’n You (take 1)
06 – Woody’n You (take 2)
07 – Loose Bloose

Personnel:
Bill Evans – piano
Zoot Sims – tenor sax
Jim Hall – guitar
Paul Chambers, Ron Carter – bass
Philly Joe Jones – drums

Recorded at Reeves Sound Studios, New York City; January 19, 1959 (tracks: 1-6)
Recorded at Nola Penthouse Sound Studios, New York City; August 21, 1962 (track: 7)
Style: Cool, Post-Bop, Mainstream Jazz – Year: 1999

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans

{re-uploaded}

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Gerry Mulligan – Night Lights {PHILIPS}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This is a rather relaxed recording featuring baritonist Gerry Mulligan and some of his top alumni (trumpeter Art Farmer, trombonist Bob Brookmeyer, guitarist Jim Hall, bassist Bill Crow, and drummer Dave Bailey) exploring three of his own songs (including “Festive Minor”), Chopin’s Prelude in E minor, “In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning,” and “Morning of the Carnival” (from Black Orpheus). The emphasis is on ballads and nothing too innovative occurs, but the results are pleasing and laid-back.

Tracks:
01 – Night Lights (1963 Version)
02 – Morning of the Carnival [From “Black Orpheus”] (Manha de Carnaval)
03 – In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning
04 – Prelude in E Minor
05 – Festival Minor
06 – Tell Me When
07 – Night Lights (1965 Version)

Personnel:
Gerry Mulligan – baritone saxophone and piano
Jim Hall – guitar
Bill Crow – bass
Dave Bailey – drums
Art Farmer – trumpet and fluegelhorn
Bob Brookmeyer – trombone

Recorded September, 1963 (1-6); and October, 1965 (7)

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

(Re-uploaded because of dead links)

Jim Hall – Live! {Verve}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This fine club date features guitarist Jim Hall in Toronto with two of the top Canadian jazzmen, bassist Don Thompson and drummer Terry Clarke. The interplay between the three players is sometimes wondrous, and although the five selections are all familiar standards (such as “‘Round Midnight,” “Scrapple From the Apple” and “The Way You Look Tonight”), Hall makes the music sound fresh and full of subtleties. This enjoyable LP has yet to be reissued on CD.

Tracks:
01 – Angel Eyes
02 – ‘Round Midnight
03 – Scrapple from the Apple
04 – The Way You Look Tonight
05 – I Hear a Rhapsody

Personnel:
Jim Hall – guitar
Don Thompson – bass
Terry Clarke – drums

Recorded June 1975 at Bourbon Street, Toronto, Canada.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Jim Hall Trio featuring Tom Harrell – These Rooms {DENON}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

This 1988 studio date is one of the overlooked treasures in the considerable discography of Jim Hall, possibly due to the label’s low-key promotion and less than eye-catching cover art. It is easy why to understand why artists like Art Farmer and Paul Desmond omitted a pianist after hearing a release such as this one, because it would only clutter Hall’s soft yet complete accompaniment. Joined by Tom Harrell (heard mostly on fluegelhorn), bassist Steve LaSpina, and drummer Joey Baron, this CD is a delight from start to finish. The interaction of the musicians in the opener, a lively, waltzing “With a Song in My Heart,” makes it sound like they have been a working unit for years. The well-conceived arrangement of “Where or When,” which Hall dedicated to Basie guitarist Freddie Green (who died the year prior to the sessions), proves to be the most captivating track, with its understated yet consummately swinging air. Hall contributed the tense “Cross Court,” a smoking post-bop vehicle, a pulsing calypso written originally for his 1985 Montreux concert with Michel Petrucciani and Wayne Shorter, as well as the haunting ballad “These Rooms,” which opens with Harrell’s melancholy unaccompanied trumpet solo, and has an abstract solo by the leader. “Something Tells Me” is a lovely bittersweet ballad by Jane Hall (Jim’s wife, a talented composer whose work he has often recorded), featuring Hall and Harrell. Hall’s unaccompanied take of Duke Ellington’s “All Too Soon” makes one wonder why he has never recorded a entire CD of guitar solos. This out of print CD is destined to become a collectible.

Tracks:
01 – With a Song in My Heart
02 – Cross Court
03 – Something Tells Me
04 – Bimini
05 – All Too Soon
06 – These Rooms
07 – Darn That Dream
08 – My Funny Valentine
09 – Where or When
10 – From Now On

Personnel:
Jim Hall – guitar
Steve LaSpina – bass
Joey Baron – drums
Tom Harrell – flugelhorn, trumpet

Recorded at Sorcerer Sound, New York City; live to 2 track digital, on February 9-10, 1988.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Paul Desmond featuring Jim Hall – Glad To Be Unhappy {RCA}


Review by Richard S. Ginell (allmusic.com)

Even though Desmond was kidding when he described himself as the world’s slowest alto player, this record bears out the kernel of truth within the jest. Here, Desmond set out to make a record of love songs and torch ballads, so the tempos are very slow to medium, the mood is of wistful relaxation, and the spaces between the notes grow longer. At first glance, Desmond may seem only peripherally involved with the music-making, keeping emotion at a cool, intellectual arms’ length, yet his exceptionally pure tone and ruminative moods wear very well over the long haul. Again, Jim Hall is his commiserator and partner, and the guitarist gets practically as much space to unwind as the headliner; the solo on “Angel Eyes” is an encyclopedia of magnificent chording and single-string eloquence. Gene Wright returns on bass, spelled by Gene Cherico on “Poor Butterfly,” and Connie Kay’s brush-dominated drum work is pushed even further into the background. A lovely recording, though not the best album in the Desmond/Hall collaboration.

Tracks:
01 – Glad To Be Unhappy
02 – Poor Butterfly
03 – Stranger in Town
04 – A Taste of Honey
05 – Any Other Time
06 – Hi-Lili, Hi-Lo
07 – AngelEyes
08 – By the River Sainte Marie
09 – All Across the City
10 – All Through the Night

Personnel:
Paul Desmond – alto saxophone
Jim Hall – guitar
Gene Wright – bass (except on 2)
Gene Cherico – bass (on 2 only)
Connie Kay – drums

Recorded in RCA Victor’s Studio “A” and Webster Hall, New York City; on 1963 and 1964.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Paul Desmond with Strings – Desmond Blue {Bluebird}


Review by Shawn M. Haney (allmusic.com)

As intended, this album presents alto sax specialist Paul Desmond as never featured before, with the backing of a string orchestra. The record, filled with such beautiful jazz standards as “My Funny Valentine,” “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” and “Body and Soul,” is very rich in texture, yet subtle and mellow overall in mood. It’s unyielding purpose: to soothe the souls of its listeners. Desmond’s style and tone shine with an alluring quality, and the record is filled with melodies that don’t fail to stimulate the sophisticated jazz listener. Desmond’s melodies are eloquently detailed and charmingly spun in the midst of the string orchestra arranged and conducted by Bob Prince. The legendary Jim Hall is featured as guest guitarist, playing yet another scintillating role and using his classic comping style. Hall is perhaps the most highly respected of all jazz guitarists for his good taste and witty inventiveness. Desmond has always been most familiar to the jazz public for his sweeping scale passages and his seemingly effortless spontaneity during periods of improvisation, although here he is often featured in a more lyrical ballad style on such romantic tunes as “My Funny Valentine,” “Late Lament,” and “Then I’ll Be Tired of You.” This album is a highly innovative and meticulously crafted work, reflecting the ongoing success of both Desmond and Hall within the 1960s and the cool jazz period. Both of these musicians spent time working with Dave Brubeck and later lent themselves to many of Antonio Carlos Jobim’s bossa nova projects. The arrangements are extraordinary throughout this collection, including the charming “Valentine,” which begins with a fantastic Elizabethan flavor. The intro sets up the mood to carry Desmond into the first chorus, which then glides into a 20th century style. The tune “I Should Care” is “a shimmering debt to Ibert and one of the most imaginative blendings you will ever hear of strings, reeds, French horn and harp,” according to the liner notes. The tone of the album: lush, reflective, thought-provoking, and soul-stirring. This work is quite a plus for any listener and especially those who consider themselves avid fans of Paul Desmond.

Tracks:
01 – My Funny Valentine
02 – Desmond Blue
03 – Then I’ll Be Tired of You
04 – I’ve Got You Under My Skin
05 – Late Lament
06 – I Should Care
07 – Like Someone in Love
08 – Ill Wind (You’re Blowin’ Me No Good)
09 – Body and Soul
10 – Autumn Leaves
11 – Imagination
12 – Advise and Consent
13 – Autumn Leaves (take 1) – previously unreleased
14 – Autumn Leaves (take 3) – previously unreleased
15 – Imagination (take 4) – previously unreleased
16 – Advise and Consent (take 4) – previously unreleased

Personnel:
Paul Desmond – alto saxophone, featuring:

Jim Hall – guitar
Gene Cherico, Milt Hinton, George Duvivier – bass
Connie Kay, Bobby Thomas, Osie Johnson – drums

and string section; arranged and conducted by Bob Prince

All selections were recorded at Webster Hall, New York City.

Recorded September 14, 1961; October 2, 1961; June 19, 1961,
September 28, 1961 and March 15, 1962.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork