Jimmy Smith & Wes Montgomery – Further Adventures of Jimmy & Wes {Verve} ”Japan”


Review by Richard S. Ginell (allmusic.com)

Further Adventures of Jimmy and Wes picks up where Dynamic Duo left off, digging a little further into the one-time-only Wes Montgomery/Jimmy Smith sessions and coming up with more fine music — mellower in general than Dynamic Duo but first-class nonetheless. Unlike most of the studio sessions from this time, Montgomery gets plenty of room for his single-string work as well as his famous octaves, and both techniques find him in full, mature bloom, needing fewer notes in which to say more (Smith, of course, is precisely the opposite). All but one of the tracks on the original LP find Smith and Montgomery interacting only with themselves, the drums of Grady Tate, and the congas of Ray Barretto; Roger Miller’s “King of the Road” (not often covered by jazzers) and Montgomery’s “O.G.D.” (later known as “Road Song”) come off best. Oliver Nelson’s big band makes a sole appearance with a swaggering chart of “Milestones.” Though Dynamic Duo is probably the priority purchase by a hairsbreadth margin, you’ll need to have both that album and Further Adventures eventually.

Tracks:
01 – King of the Road
02 – Maybe September
03 – OGD
04 – Call Me
05 – Milestones
06 – Mellow Mood

Personnel:
Jimmy Smith – organ
Wes Montgomery – guitar
Grady Tate – drums
Richard Davis – bass
Ray Barretto – percussion

Bob Ashton, Danny Bank, Jerry Dodgion, Jerome Richardson, Phil Woods – woodwinds
Jimmy Maxwell, Joe Newman, Ernie Royal, Clark Terry – trumpets
Jimmy Cleveland, Quentin Jackson, Melba Liston – trombones
Tony Studd – bass trombone

Recorded on September 21 and 28, 1966
Year: 2004

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

{re-uploaded}

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Freddie Hubbard – The Body & The Soul {impulse!} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Michael G. Nastos (allmusic.com)

At age 25, Freddie Hubbard made inroads into modern jazz most trumpeters could not imagine, much less come through with. As a soloist, one of Hubbard’s crowning achievements in his early period was this recording on which he teamed with Wayne Shorter, marginally as a performer but prominent in the role of arranger/conductor for his first time ever. Utilizing a septet, 16-piece big band, and orchestra plus stings to play concise, tight tunes, Shorter provides the backdrop to employ Hubbard’s bold toned trumpet and all of its devices in a full display of his powerful melodic talents. Yeoman Reggie Workman plays bass on all selections, with drummer Louis Hayes in the seven-piece combo, and great work from Philly Joe Jones in the larger bands. Interestingly enough, the three tracks with the smaller ensemble are the most interesting, due to the presence of Eric Dolphy, Curtis Fuller, Cedar Walton, and Shorter on the front line. “Clarence’s Place” is a post-bop jewel with spiky brass accents and Dolphy’s ribald and outre alto sax solo contrasting Shorter’s relatively reserved tenor, “Dedicated to You” is a wisp of a tune, while “Body & Soul,” an atypical choice for the opening selection, is a straight read of the classic ballad with a chart that sounds larger than the small horn section, and a wavering flute via Dolphy. The big band does an unusual soul-jazz treatment of the Brazilian number “Manha de Carnaval” flavored by Robert Northern’s French horn, while “Aries” is a hard bop show stopper with two-note accents buoying Hubbard’s great lyrical lines, and goes further into hard bop with “Thermo” as the horns demand attention with the trumpeter as an afterthought. The string section, ten pieces strong, joins the big band on the film noir type Duke Ellington piece “Chocolate Shake,” the stock “I Got It Bad,” and “Skylark,” with its soft clarion intro bubbling underneath with the violins, violas, and cellos. The manner in which this recording is programmed is thoughtful in that it lends to the diversity of the project, but is seamless from track to track. Dan Morgenstern’s hefty liner notes also explain the concept behind this ambitious project, one which did not compare to any of Hubbard’s other recordings in his career. Therefore it stands alone as one of the most unique productions in his substantive discography, and a quite credible initial go-round for Shorter as an orchestrator.

Tracks:
01 – Body and Soul
02 – Carnival (Manha de Carnaval)
03 – Chocolate Shake
04 – Dedicated to You
05 – Clarence’s Place
06 – Aries
07 – Skylark
08 – I Got it Bad and That A’int Good
09 – Thermo

Personnel:
Wayne Shorter – tenor sax (leader & arranger)
Freddie Hubbard – trumpet
Bob Northern, Julius Watkins – frenchorn
Cedar Walton – piano
Joe Jones – drums
Reggie Workman – bass
Melba Liston, Curtis Fuller – trombone
Jerome Richardson – baritone saxophone
Eric Dolphy – alto saxophone
etc.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Stanley Turrentine – Salt Song {SONY}


Review by Steve Huey (allmusic.com)

Stanley Turrentine’s stint with Creed Taylor’s CTI label may not have produced any out-and-out classics on the level of the very best LPs by Freddie Hubbard, Hubert Laws, or George Benson, but the bluesy tenorist’s output was consistently strong and worthwhile for all but the most stridently anti-fusion listeners. Salt Song was Turrentine’s second album for CTI, and while it’s perhaps just a small cut below his debut Sugar, it’s another fine, eclectic outing that falls squarely into the signature CTI fusion sound: smooth but not slick, accessible but not simplistic. In general, keyboardist Eumir Deodato’s arrangements have plenty of light funk and Brazilian underpinnings, the latter often courtesy of percussionist Airto Moreira. The first three cuts are the most memorable, beginning with a ten-minute exploration of the abrupt time signature shifts of Freddie Hubbard’s “Gibraltar.” Though a hard bop version might have returned to the theme a little less often, Turrentine’s solo sections are full of ideas, befitting one of his favorite pieces of the period; plus, guitarist Eric Gale shines as both a rhythm and lead player. The traditional gospel tune “I Told Jesus” features Turrentine at his bluesiest and earthiest, with snatches of ethereal choir vocals floating up behind him. Milton Nascimento’s title track, naturally, has the strongest Brazilian flavor of the program, and Turrentine skillfully negotiates its frequent shifts in and out of double time. The 1997 CD reissue also includes Nascimento’s “Vera Cruz” as a bonus track. All in all, Salt Song has dated well, partly because the arrangements don’t overemphasize electric piano, but mostly on the strength of Turrentine’s always-soulful playing.

Tracks:
01 – Gibraltar
02 – I Told Jesus
03 – Salt Song
04 – I Haven’t Got Anything Better to Do
05 – Storm
06 – Vera Cruz (bonus)

Personnel:
Stanley Turrentine – tenor saxophone
Ron Carter, Russell George – bass
Billy Cobham, Airto Moreira – drums
Airto Moreira, Joao Palma, Dom Um Romao – percussion
Eumir Deodato, Horace Parlan, Richard Tee – piano/electric piano/organ
Eric Gale, Sivuca – guitar
Hubert Laws, George Marge, Romeo Penque, Jerome Richardson – flute
Julius Brand, Paul Gershman, Julie Held, Leo Kahn, Harry Katzman, Joe Malin – violin
Harold Coletta – viola
Charles McCracken, Alan Shulman – cello
Margaret Branch, Brenda Bryant, Patricia Smith – voices

Arranged and conducted by Eumir Deodato
Tracks 1-5 recorded at Van Gelder Studios, July 7 & 13, 1971
Track 6 recorded at Van Gelder Studios, April 23, 1971

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Donald Byrd & Kenny Burrell – All Night Long {Prestige}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Two of guitarist Kenny Burrell’s best sessions from the 1950s were this release and its companion, All Day Long. Burrell is teamed with an impressive group of young all-stars, including trumpeter Donald Byrd, tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley, Jerome Richardson on flute and tenor, pianist Mal Waldron, bassist Doug Watkins, and drummer Art Taylor. In addition to the lengthy “All Night Long” and three group originals (two by Mobley and one from Waldron), the original LP program has been augmented by a medley of “Body and Soul” and “Tune Up” from the same session. Jam sessions such as this one are only as good as the solos; fortunately, all of the musicians sound quite inspired, making this an easily recommended set.

Tracks:
01 – All Night Long
02 – Boo-Lu
03 – Flickers
04 – Li’l Hankie
05 – Body & Soul
06 – Tune Up

Personnel:
Donald Byrd – trumpet
Hank Mobley – tenor saxophone
Jerome Richardson – flute, tenor saxophone
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Doug Watkins – bass
Art Taylor – drums

Recorded in Hackensack, NJ; December 28, 1956.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Teri Thornton – I’ll Be Easy to Find {Verve}


Review by Michael G. Nastos (allmusic.com)

After a nearly 40-year hiatus, Teri Thornton is back to swing and sing her way into your heart. In comparison to her old Riverside recordings, it seems she’s lost nothing vocally, her angelic clarity and soulful vibrato are intact, and her enthusiasm is still spiking depth charts. She’s backed by her own piano on four cuts, and the able Ray Chew on the others, save Norman Simmons for the sole live-in-concert finale (she and Simmons are credited) with bassist Lonnie Plaxico, alto sax and flute master Jerome Richardson, trombonist Dave Bargeron, multi-instrumentalist Howard Johnson, and drummer J.T. Lewis. At her best on ballads, blues, and upbeat swingers, Thornton proves she really can do it all. Her rippling Ella-cum-Sarah chords are unfettered on a rousing live “Salty Mama” with Grady Tate (drums) and Michael Bowie (bass). The funky blues is all right with Thornton on “Feels Good.” A showstopper, “Knee Deep in the Blues,” and the faded in and out bossa “Wishing Well” are from her pen. The most unusual arrangement by producer Suzi Reynolds of “Nature Boy” has no discernible time signature. It’s kinetic but seems to float, Plaxico punctuating but never seeming to ever hit one. Richardson’s great flute work and Bargeron and Johnson’s background horns play inquisitive mind games, quite a challenging listen. She sings the ballads “Somewhere in the Night,” “Where Are You Running?,” and the title cut immaculately — not kitten soft but forcefully pronounced. She’s boppin’ on “It Ain’t Necessarily So” and adapts “The Lord’s Prayer” in a modal vein, Chew’s piano chordally searching for deliverance, and she really shines instrumentally on “I’ll Be Seeing You” in a fashion that rivals Shirley Horn. There is a definitive song, “I Believe in You,” with a great lyric that seems to sum up the influence of a certain someone who has helped Thornton through her battles with cancer and the constant yin-yang of raising a family for these past four decades. Teri Thornton is emphatically back with this complete view of an artist, finally giving us a taste of what we’ve suspected these many years.

Tracks:
01 – Somewhere in the Night
02 – I Believe in You
03 – It Ain’t Necessarily So
04 – The Lord’s Prayer
05 – Knee Deep in the Blues
06 – I’ll Be Easy to Find
07 – Nature Boy
08 – Wishing Well
09 – Where Are You Running?
10 – Feels Good
11 – I’ll Be Seeing You
12 – Salty Mama

Personnel:
Teri Thornton – vocals (all tracks), piano (7, 10, 11)
Howard Johnson – cornet, tuba, contrabass clarinet, baritone sax (1, 3, 5, 7-9)
Dave Bargeron – trombone (1, 7-9)
Jerome Richardson – flute, bass flute, alto sax (1, 4, 7-9)
Ray Chew – piano (1-6, 8, 9)
Norman Simmons – piano (12)
Lonnie Plaxico – bass (1-11)
Michael Bowie – bass (12)
J. T. Lewis – drums (1-11)
Grady Tate – drums (12)

Recorded on June 22 & 24, 1997 at RPM Studios, New York

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork