Hank Mobley – Jazz Message of Hank Mobley, Volume.2 {Savoy} “mono”


Review by Jim Todd (allmusic.com)

Impressive lineups, both in the front line and the rhythm section, fuel the two 1956 sessions on this Savoy reissue. The players are committed, the writing is good, and the performances reward repeated listening. The result is a worthwhile precursor to the industry-standard hard bop Mobley would later record for Blue Note.Lee Morgan, then 18, joins Mobley on two tracks that have pianist Hank Jones, bassist Doug Watkins, and drummer Art Taylor in the rhythm section. Even if Morgan at this time was audibly still growing as a trumpet player, his poise, execution, and resourceful imagination were already the tools of a master. Donald Byrd, on form and playing with crispness and authority, moves into the trumpet chair for the three remaining tracks. This time it’s Barry Harris on piano, Kenny Clarke on drums, and Watkins (again) on bass. The influence on Mobley of swing era tenors, from Lester Young to Illinois Jacquet, can be clearly heard on these tracks. Mobley’s respect for and understanding of the pre-bebop style serve him well in his contribution to the development of the predominant jazz style that followed bebop. In addition to three Mobley originals, there is a blues by Thad Jones and another from Watkins. The standout track is Mobley’s “Space Flight,” a bright, up-tempo bop number that has memorable solos from Mobley, Byrd, Harris, and Clarke. The recording on this CD is very good but, as is common on Savoy reissues, the running time isn’t long — 32 minutes in the case of this jazz message.

Tracks:
01 – Thad’s Blues
02 – Doug’s Minor B’ Ok”
03 – B. for B.B.
04 – Blues Number Two
05 – Space Flight

Personnel:
Hank Mobley – tenor saxophone
Lee Morgan, Donald Byrd – trumpet
Hank Jones, Barry Harris – piano
Doug Watkins – bass
Art Taylor, Kenny Clarke – drums

Recorded on November 7 and July 23; 1956

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

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Ernestine Anderson – My Kinda Swing {Mercury}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

Ernestine Anderson was 32 years old at the time of this 1960 session, not long before her career inexplicably fell into the doldrums. This album finds her in great form, supported by a cast of musicians including Clark Terry, Hank Jones, Yusef Lateef, Ernie Royal, Frank Rehak, and Kenny Burrell, with terrific arrangements by Ernie Wilkins. She achieves the perfect balance in her interpretation of “Trouble Is a Man,” a masterful ballad written by Alec Wilder, and she’s clearly in her element in the hard-rocking blues “See See Rider.” Terry’s striking trumpet almost provides a contrasting vocal alongside Anderson during “All My Life,” while her understated approach to a quick run through “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)” showcases Jones and Burrell. Lateef’s oboe adds to the exotic flavor of “Lazy Afternoon.”

Tracks:
01 – My Kinda Love
02 – Trouble is a Man
03 – See See Rider
04 – Moonlight in Vermont
05 – Land of Dreams
06 – Black Moonlight
07 – All My Life
08 – Mound Bayou
09 – I’ll Never Be the Same
10 – It Don’t Mean a Thing (if it Ain’t Got That Swing)
11 – Lazy Afternoon
12 – They Didn’t Believe Me

Personnel:
Ernestine Anderson – vocals, with Ernie Wilkins’s Orchestra including:
Ernie Royal, Clark Terry – trumpet
Frank Rehak – trombone
Yusef Lateef – tenor sax, flute, oboe
Tate Houston – baritone sax
Mac Ceppos – violin
Hank Jones – piano
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Art Davis – bass
Willie Rodriguez – percussion
Charlie Persip – drums
Ernie Wilkins – arranger & conductor

Recorded late 1960 in New York City.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans

Art Pepper – New York Album {Analogue Productions}


Review by Andrew Bartlett (amazon.com)
After prison, after first shocking, then disappointing, and perhaps ultimately (and grimly) amusing the jazz world with enough dope-related hijinks to fill a book (as in Straight Life), alto saxist Art Pepper made a triumphant mid-1970s comeback. This 1979 session is rich with the fruits of Pepper’s return, a depth of playing that shows itself constantly throughout the New York Album’s five tunes. Pepper, as his widow, Laurie, notes in the liners, was always best when out to prove himself. Here, he’s out to show pianist Hank Jones, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Al Foster that he’s still a force to reckon with. “A Night in Tunisia” is fascinating, if a trifle straightly read, as is “Straight, No Chaser.” The best bits here, though, are Pepper’s yearning solo rendition of “Lover Man,” the piano-bass duo on “Duo Blues,” and the blazing, off-time take on “My Friend John,” one of the leader’s funkiest charts ever. This reissue of New York is additionally bolstered by terrific audiophile sound, the hallmark of Analogue Productions’ work in the jazz world.

Tracks:
01 – A Night in Tunisia
02 – Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be)
03 – Straight, No Chaser (alternate take)
04 – Duo Blues
05 – My Friend John

Personnel:
Art Pepper – alto saxophone
Hank Jones – piano (except on “Duo Blues”)
Ron Carter – bass (except on “Lover Man”)
Al Foster – drums (except on “Duo Blues” and “Lover Man”)

Recorded February 23, 1979 at Sound Ideas, NYC;
and May 26, 1979 at Kendum Recorders, Burbank, CA.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Hank Jones, Christian McBride, Jimmy Cobb – West of 5th {Chesky}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

Veteran pianist Hank Jones is hardly slowing down at the age of 87, as heard on this beautifully recorded session in early 2006. With drummer Jimmy Cobb (who sticks to brushes) and Christian McBride rounding out his potent trio, Jones keeps old warhorses like “On Green Dolphin Street” fresh, giving ample space to his partner and adding a humorous detour into Billy Strayhorn’s “Rain Check.” Other highlights include his elegant treatment of his late brother Thad’s timeless ballad “A Child Is Born” and a hard driving take of Charlie Parker’s “Confirmation.” McBride shows depth beyond his years with strong accompaniment and swinging solos. This Hybrid Super Audio CD, recorded without any gimmickry such as remixing or compression, enables the listener to enjoy these intimate performances as if sitting in the studio with the players. Highly recommended!

Tracks:
01 – On Green Dolphin Street
02 – Mr. Walker
03 – Speak Low
04 – A Child is Born
05 – If I Were a Bell
06 – Billie’s Bounce
07 – Lotus Blossom
08 – Confirmation
09 – We’ll Be Together Again
10 – Stella by Starlight
11 – Eleanor

Personnel:
Hank Jones – piano
Christian McBride – bass
Jimmy Cobb – drums

Recorded January 29, 2006 at St.Peter’s Episcopal Church, New York City.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Ben Webster – See You at The Fair {impulse!} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Ben Webster’s final American recording was one of his greatest. At 55, the tenor saxophonist was still very much in his prime but considered out of style in the U.S. He would soon permanently move to Europe where he was better appreciated. This CD has the nine selections originally included on the LP of the same name, a quartet set with either Hank Jones or Roger Kellaway on piano, bassist Richard Davis, and drummer Osie Johnson. Webster’s tone has rarely sounded more beautiful than on “Someone to Watch Over Me” and “Our Love Is Here to Stay.” In addition, one song from the same session (but originally released on a sampler) and two tunes featuring Webster on an Oliver Nelson date (More Blues and the Abstract Truth) wrap up this definitive CD.

Tracks:
01 – See You at The Fair
02 – Over the Rainbow
03 – Our Love ‘s Here to Stay
04 – In a Mellow Tone
05 – Lullaby of Jazzland
06 – Stardust
07 – Fall of Love
08 – While We’re Dancing
09 – Someone to Watch Over Me

Personnel:
Ben Webster – tenor sax
Hank Jones – piano
Roger Kellaway – piano and harpsichord
Richard Davis – bass
Osie Johnson – drums

Recorded March 11 and 25, 1964.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Hank Jones (Great Jazz Trio) – Autumn Leaves {441 Records}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

The Great Jazz Trio was a working cooperative working with various lineups led by Hank Jones in during the 1970s and 1980s, but the revival of this defunct group finds Jones joined by two newcomers to the group, seasoned veterans Richard Davis on bass and the leader’s brother, Elvin Jones, on drums. Oddly enough, the two brothers have recorded together very infrequently during their long careers, so this opportunity must have been special to them. The opening track signals a different direction for the group, with Elvin’s explosive solo stealing the show in “Autumn Leaves.” The pianist’s imaginative arrangement of “Yesterdays” begins as a stunning solo before Davis’ sparse bass and Elvin’s brushes join him. The buoyant treatment of Kenny Dorham’s “Blue Bossa” finds Hank in a humorous mood, inserting several brief quotes from well-known works such as “Hot House” and “Blue Skies.” The trio is clearly cooking by the time it recorded the percolating take of Oliver Nelson’s “Six and Four.” Hopefully, this delightful date by the Great Jazz Trio will result in a follow-up recording session.

Tracks:
01 – Autumn Leaves
02 – Yesterdays
03 – Rhythm-a-Ning
04 – Blue Bossa
05 – Take the “A” Train
06 – Summertime
07 – Caravan
08 – Six and Four
09 – My Funny Valentine
10 – Bye Bye Blackbird

Personnel:
Hank Jones – piano
Richard Davis – bass
Elvin Jones – drums

Recorded at Avatar Studios, New York, on May 12 and 13, 2002

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Cannonball Adderley – Somethin’ Else {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Steven McDonald (allmusic.com)

It isn’t too difficult to understand why MFSL considered this album to be a worthy candidate for an Ultradisc reissue — aside from Cannonball Adderley, you have a lineup that includes Miles Davis, Hank Jones, Sam Jones, and Art Blakey. This is a group that could take on a Barry Manilow number and turn it into a jazz masterpiece. MFSL have done the purchaser a favor, too, by including an additional track that was left off the original album. This sixth track, “”Alison’s Uncle,”” closes out Somethin’ Else on a high note, changing the flow of energy in an interesting way (purists can still finish up on a quieter note, as with the original, by programming “”Dancing in the Dark”” as the final track). In many ways it’s a surprise that this track was left off originally — it’s an excellent piece, with Adderley and Davis trading licks and solos while Jones and Blakey keep pace. Blakey also takes some terrific solos. The remastering job is the usual superb MFSL effort, producing clear sound with almost no background noise. Due to the original recording (made in 1958), Davis’ trumpet sometimes seems a little shrill and metallic, but it’s not an overwhelming problem — certainly not when you consider Davis’ style. Altogether, an excellent addition to any jazz collection.

Tracks:
01 – Autumn Leaves
02 – Love for Sale
03 – Somethin’ Else
04 – One for Daddy-O
05 – Dancing in the Dark
06 – Alison’s Uncle (aka Bangoon)

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet
Cannonball Adderley – alto sax
Hank Jones – piano
Sam Jones – bass
Art Blakey – drums

Originally released in 1958 by Blue Note Records as BST-81595.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork