Coleman Hawkins – In a Mellow Tone {Prestige}[OJC]


Review from “cduniverse.com”
Few jazz giants have been as important and as relevant for as long as the Bean, a revealing nickname; it’s apparently a contraction of “the best and only.” Hawkins received this appellation during his tenure with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. The saxophonist’s gruff yet mellifluous, smoky yet coarse tone influenced generations of musicians.

This compilation features music from Hawkins’ years with Prestige Records. Filled with many exciting and tranquil moments, IN A MELLOW TONE captures a great period in the saxophonist’s forty-plus year career. The album’s opener, “You Blew Out the Flame In My Heart” displays Hawkins’ ability to swing with a light buoyant feel, while ballads such as “I Want to Be Loved,” “Greensleeves,” “Then I’ll be Tired of You,” and “Until the Real Thing Comes Along” show the degree of delicacy and intimacy of which Hawkins was capable. Finally, the album’s title track brims with energy and verve, due in large part to Gus Johnson’s crisp drumming.

Tracklist:
01 – You Blew Out the Flame in My Heart
02 – I Want to Be Loved
03 – In a Mellow Tone
04 – Greensleeves
05 – Through for the Night
06 – Until the Real Thing Comes Along
07 – The Sweetest Sounds
08 – Then I’ll Be Tired of You
09 – Jammin’ in Swingville

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis – tenor sax
Hilton Jefferson – alto sax
Jimmy Hamilton – clarinet
Vic Dickenson, J.C. Higginbotham – trombone
Joe Thomas, Charlie Shavers, Joe Newman – trumpet
Tommy Flanagan, Red Garland, Ray Bryant – piano
Kenny Burrell, Tiny Grimes – guitar
Wendell Marshall, Doug Watkins, Ron Carter, George Duvivier, Major Jolley – bass
Osie Johnson, Charles “Specs” Wright, Gus Johnson, Eddie Locke, Bill English – drums

Recorded between November 7, 1958 – March 30, 1962;
at Hackensack, NJ (#2, 4, 5 and 6); and Englewood Cliffs, NJ (#1, 3, 7, 8 and 9)

Label: Prestige – OJC
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream Jazz, Saxophone

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Gene Ammons – Late Hour Special {Fantasy} “Russian Print”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Originally released by Prestige while tenor saxophonist Gene Ammons was serving a long prison sentence for possession of drugs (the label effectively kept Ammons’ name alive by regularly coming out with “new” material), this album was reissued on CD in 1997. The distinctive tenor is heard on three numbers with a quartet/quintet also including pianist Patti Bown, bassist George Duvivier, drummer Walter Perkins, and sometimes Ray Barretto on conga, and on four cuts as part of a ten-piece group arranged by Oliver Nelson. Flugelhornist Clark Terry gets a couple of choruses on “Things Ain’t What They Used to Be,” and Bown has several solos, but Ammons is the main star throughout. In addition to performing his own “Lascivious” (a blues), he sticks to standards, infusing each tune with soul and swing. A fine outing, although with brief (35 & 1/2 minutes) playing time.

Tracks:
01 – The Party’s Over
02 – I Want to Be Loved (But by Only You)
03 – Things Ain’t What They Used to Be
04 – Lascivious
05 – Makin’ Whoopee
06 – Soft Winds
07 – Lullaby of the Leaves

Personnel:
Gene Ammons – tenor saxophone
George Barrow, Red Holloway – tenor saxophone
Oliver Nelson – alto saxophone, arranger & conductor
Bob Ashton – baritone saxophone
Clark Terry, Hobart Dotson – trumpet
Patti Bown, Richard Wyands – piano
George Duvivier, Wendell Marshall – bass
Walter Perkins, Bill English – drums
Ray Barretto – conga

Recorded in Englewood Cliffs, NJ; on June 13, 1961 and April 13, 1962.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Paul Desmond with Strings – Desmond Blue {Bluebird}


Review by Shawn M. Haney (allmusic.com)

As intended, this album presents alto sax specialist Paul Desmond as never featured before, with the backing of a string orchestra. The record, filled with such beautiful jazz standards as “My Funny Valentine,” “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” and “Body and Soul,” is very rich in texture, yet subtle and mellow overall in mood. It’s unyielding purpose: to soothe the souls of its listeners. Desmond’s style and tone shine with an alluring quality, and the record is filled with melodies that don’t fail to stimulate the sophisticated jazz listener. Desmond’s melodies are eloquently detailed and charmingly spun in the midst of the string orchestra arranged and conducted by Bob Prince. The legendary Jim Hall is featured as guest guitarist, playing yet another scintillating role and using his classic comping style. Hall is perhaps the most highly respected of all jazz guitarists for his good taste and witty inventiveness. Desmond has always been most familiar to the jazz public for his sweeping scale passages and his seemingly effortless spontaneity during periods of improvisation, although here he is often featured in a more lyrical ballad style on such romantic tunes as “My Funny Valentine,” “Late Lament,” and “Then I’ll Be Tired of You.” This album is a highly innovative and meticulously crafted work, reflecting the ongoing success of both Desmond and Hall within the 1960s and the cool jazz period. Both of these musicians spent time working with Dave Brubeck and later lent themselves to many of Antonio Carlos Jobim’s bossa nova projects. The arrangements are extraordinary throughout this collection, including the charming “Valentine,” which begins with a fantastic Elizabethan flavor. The intro sets up the mood to carry Desmond into the first chorus, which then glides into a 20th century style. The tune “I Should Care” is “a shimmering debt to Ibert and one of the most imaginative blendings you will ever hear of strings, reeds, French horn and harp,” according to the liner notes. The tone of the album: lush, reflective, thought-provoking, and soul-stirring. This work is quite a plus for any listener and especially those who consider themselves avid fans of Paul Desmond.

Tracks:
01 – My Funny Valentine
02 – Desmond Blue
03 – Then I’ll Be Tired of You
04 – I’ve Got You Under My Skin
05 – Late Lament
06 – I Should Care
07 – Like Someone in Love
08 – Ill Wind (You’re Blowin’ Me No Good)
09 – Body and Soul
10 – Autumn Leaves
11 – Imagination
12 – Advise and Consent
13 – Autumn Leaves (take 1) – previously unreleased
14 – Autumn Leaves (take 3) – previously unreleased
15 – Imagination (take 4) – previously unreleased
16 – Advise and Consent (take 4) – previously unreleased

Personnel:
Paul Desmond – alto saxophone, featuring:

Jim Hall – guitar
Gene Cherico, Milt Hinton, George Duvivier – bass
Connie Kay, Bobby Thomas, Osie Johnson – drums

and string section; arranged and conducted by Bob Prince

All selections were recorded at Webster Hall, New York City.

Recorded September 14, 1961; October 2, 1961; June 19, 1961,
September 28, 1961 and March 15, 1962.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Herb Ellis & Remo Palmier – Windflower {Concord}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This album is most significant for being the first jazz recording in a few decades by guitarist Remo Palmier (who was also known early on as Palmieri). Fellow guitarist Herb Ellis was the leader but he gives his guest just as much solo space as he takes and, with the tasteful accompaniment of bassist George Duvivier and drummer Ron Traxler, the two old friends challenge each other on a variety of appealing chord changes including “The Night Has a Thousand Eyes,” “Close Your Eyes,” “Walkin'” and Jobim’s “Triste.” The success of this boppish set led to Palmieri getting his own Concord album the following year.

Tracks:
01 – Windflower
02 – The Night Has a Thousand Eyes
03 – My Foolish Heart
04 – Close Your Eyes
05 – Danny Boy
06 – Walkin’
07 – Stardust
08 – Triste
09 – Groove Merchant

Personnel:
Herb Ellis – guitar
Remo Palmier – guitar
George Duvivier – bass
Ron Traxler – drums

Recorded at Bell Sound Studios, New York City, NY; 1978

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Shelly Manne – 2 3 4 {impulse!} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This unusual CD reissue has five selections from a date featuring the great tenor Coleman Hawkins, pianist Hank Jones, bassist George Duvivier and drummer Shelly Manne. Both “Take the ‘A’ Train” and “Cherokee” find the group at times playing two tempos at once (Manne sticks to doubletime throughout “Cherokee”) and showing that they had heard some of the avant-garde players. The most swinging piece, “Avalon,” was previously available only on a sampler while “Me and Some Drums” features Hawkins and Manne in a very effective duet with the veteran tenor making his only recorded appearance on piano during the first half. This CD is rounded off by a pair of trio features for Eddie Costa (with Duvivier and Manne); one song apiece on vibes and drums. A very interesting set with more than its share of surprises.

Tracks:
01 – Take The “A” Train
02 – The Sicks of Us
03 – Slowly
04 – Lean on Me
05 – Cherokee
06 – Me and Some Drums

Personnel:
Shelly Manne – drums
George Duvivier – bass
Coleman Hawkins – tenor sax
Hank Jones – piano
Eddie Costa – piano and vibes

Recorded on February 6, 1962

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork