Jimmy Smith & Wes Montgomery – Further Adventures of Jimmy & Wes {Verve} ”Japan”


Review by Richard S. Ginell (allmusic.com)

Further Adventures of Jimmy and Wes picks up where Dynamic Duo left off, digging a little further into the one-time-only Wes Montgomery/Jimmy Smith sessions and coming up with more fine music — mellower in general than Dynamic Duo but first-class nonetheless. Unlike most of the studio sessions from this time, Montgomery gets plenty of room for his single-string work as well as his famous octaves, and both techniques find him in full, mature bloom, needing fewer notes in which to say more (Smith, of course, is precisely the opposite). All but one of the tracks on the original LP find Smith and Montgomery interacting only with themselves, the drums of Grady Tate, and the congas of Ray Barretto; Roger Miller’s “King of the Road” (not often covered by jazzers) and Montgomery’s “O.G.D.” (later known as “Road Song”) come off best. Oliver Nelson’s big band makes a sole appearance with a swaggering chart of “Milestones.” Though Dynamic Duo is probably the priority purchase by a hairsbreadth margin, you’ll need to have both that album and Further Adventures eventually.

Tracks:
01 – King of the Road
02 – Maybe September
03 – OGD
04 – Call Me
05 – Milestones
06 – Mellow Mood

Personnel:
Jimmy Smith – organ
Wes Montgomery – guitar
Grady Tate – drums
Richard Davis – bass
Ray Barretto – percussion

Bob Ashton, Danny Bank, Jerry Dodgion, Jerome Richardson, Phil Woods – woodwinds
Jimmy Maxwell, Joe Newman, Ernie Royal, Clark Terry – trumpets
Jimmy Cleveland, Quentin Jackson, Melba Liston – trombones
Tony Studd – bass trombone

Recorded on September 21 and 28, 1966
Year: 2004

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

{re-uploaded}

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Ernestine Anderson – My Kinda Swing {Mercury}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

Ernestine Anderson was 32 years old at the time of this 1960 session, not long before her career inexplicably fell into the doldrums. This album finds her in great form, supported by a cast of musicians including Clark Terry, Hank Jones, Yusef Lateef, Ernie Royal, Frank Rehak, and Kenny Burrell, with terrific arrangements by Ernie Wilkins. She achieves the perfect balance in her interpretation of “Trouble Is a Man,” a masterful ballad written by Alec Wilder, and she’s clearly in her element in the hard-rocking blues “See See Rider.” Terry’s striking trumpet almost provides a contrasting vocal alongside Anderson during “All My Life,” while her understated approach to a quick run through “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)” showcases Jones and Burrell. Lateef’s oboe adds to the exotic flavor of “Lazy Afternoon.”

Tracks:
01 – My Kinda Love
02 – Trouble is a Man
03 – See See Rider
04 – Moonlight in Vermont
05 – Land of Dreams
06 – Black Moonlight
07 – All My Life
08 – Mound Bayou
09 – I’ll Never Be the Same
10 – It Don’t Mean a Thing (if it Ain’t Got That Swing)
11 – Lazy Afternoon
12 – They Didn’t Believe Me

Personnel:
Ernestine Anderson – vocals, with Ernie Wilkins’s Orchestra including:
Ernie Royal, Clark Terry – trumpet
Frank Rehak – trombone
Yusef Lateef – tenor sax, flute, oboe
Tate Houston – baritone sax
Mac Ceppos – violin
Hank Jones – piano
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Art Davis – bass
Willie Rodriguez – percussion
Charlie Persip – drums
Ernie Wilkins – arranger & conductor

Recorded late 1960 in New York City.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans