Bill Evans – The Tokyo Concert {Fantasy}[OJC]


Review by Ken Dryden ~allmusic.com
The Bill Evans Trio’s 1973 concert in Tokyo was his first recording for Fantasy and it produced yet another Grammy nomination for the presentation. With bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Marty Morell, this straight reissue of the original LP mixes offbeat songs with overlooked gems, familiar standards, and surprisingly, only one Evans composition, the demanding “T.T.T.T. (Twelve Tone Tune Two).” Bobbie Gentry’s “Mornin’ Glory” was an unusual choice to open the performance and seems a bit conservative for Evans. The adrenaline picks up considerably with his mid-tempo waltzing take of Jerome Kern’s “Up With the Lark” and a driving “My Romance.” Evans also revisits the twisting Scott LaFaro tune “Gloria’s Step,” which showcases both Gomez and Morell. The closer, “On Green Dolphin Street,” is given a slight bossa nova flavor and isn’t nearly as aggressive as most of the pianist’s live recordings of this popular standard. Although this CD doesn’t rank among the Top Five live dates recorded by Bill Evans, it should be considered an essential part of his discography. It seems odd that no additional music turned up for this reissue, as the concert is just under an hour long; all nine tracks are included in the boxed set The Complete Fantasy Recordings.

Tracklist:
01. Mornin’ Glory (5:48)
02. Up with the Lark (6:48)
03. Yesterday I Heard the Rain (6:33)
04. My Romance (8:43)
05. When Autumn Comes (6:05)
06. T.T.T.T. (Twelve Tone Tune Two) (6:38)
07. Hullo Bolinas (4:01)
08. Gloria’s Step (7:57)
09. On Green Dolphin Street (6:47)

Personnel:
Bill Evans – piano
Eddie Gomez – bass
Marty Morell – drums

Recorded in performance at Yubin Chokin Hall, Tokyo, Japan; January 20, 1973.
Digital mastering, 1990 – Phil De Lancie; Fantasy Studios, Berkeley.
Produced by Helen Keane.

Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Post-Bop
Label: Fantasy / OJC
Year: 1990
Time: 59:19

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + full scans
Quality-2: mp3@320 + full scans

Eliane Elias – Cross Currents {DENON}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Pianist Eliane Elias’ second of two Denon CDs recorded before she hooked up with Blue Note is a lesser-known but worthy session. Elias is mostly featured in a trio with bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Jack DeJohnette performing originals, a pair of Charles Mingus compositions (“Peggy’s Blue Skylight” and “East Coastin'”), “Beautiful Love,” “When You Wish Upon a Star” and Bud Powell’s “Hallucinations.” Elias was quickly developing into a strong modern mainstream pianist. The concluding number (“Coming and Going”) was written by her grandmother in 1927 at age 12 and features Elias with Gomez, drummer Peter Erskine, guitarist Barry Finnerty, percussionist Cafe and nine singers (including a few family members). Well worth searching for.

Tracks:
01 – Hallucinations
02 – Cross Currents
03 – Beautiful Love
04 – Campari & Soda
05 – One Side of You
06 – Another Side of You
07 – Peggy’s Blue Skylight
08 – Impulsive
09 – When You Wish Upon a Star
10 – East Coastin’
11 – Coming and Going

Personnel:
Eliane Elias – piano
Eddie Gomez – bass
Jack DeJohnette, Peter Erskine – drums
Barry Finnerty – acoustic guitar
Cafe – percussion

Recorded and mixed March 16-21, 1987 at RPM Studios, NYC.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Bill Evans – The Bill Evans Album {SONY}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

On this CD reissue (which adds three “new” alternate takes to the original seven song-program), Bill Evans made his debut on electric piano, usually playing it in conjunction with his acoustic piano. Joined by bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Marty Morell, Evans performs seven of his stronger originals including “Funkallero,” “The Two Lonely People,” “Re: Person I Knew,” “T.T.T.” and “Waltz for Debby.” Although not as distinctive on the electric keyboard as he was on the acoustic counterpart, Evans sounds inspired by its possibilities and is heard in top creative form throughout the date.

Tracks:
01 – Funkallero
02 – The Two Lonely People
03 – Sugar Plum
04 – Waltz for Debby
05 – T.T.T. (Twelve Tone Tune)
06 – Re: Person I Knew
07 – Comrade Conrad
08 – Waltz for Debby (alternate)
09 – Re: Person I Knew (alternate)
10 – Funkallero (alternate)

Personnel:
Bill Evans – acoustic and electric piano
Eddie Gomez – acoustic bass
Marty Morrell – drums

Recorded at Columbia Records 30th Street Studio, New York City;
on May 11, 12, 17, 19, 20 and June 9; 1971.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Bill Evans with Jeremy Steig – What’s New {Verve} “Japan”


Review by “Andrew (Denver, Colorado)” (amazon.com)

Bill Evans did not record too many collaborations with other artists outside of his own trios, probably because few could hold their own in the presence of his intensely emotional improvisations. Well known are his fine recordings with Jim Hall and the album he made with Toots Tiellemans – Affinity.
Far less so is this session with Jeremy Steig, son of the more famous cartoonist William Steig. Jeremy’s main efforts were in the Jazz Fusion field which was in vogue in the late sixties and early seventies. This recording attests to his astonishing ability in the straight ahead jazz genre. More importantly, the level of his emotional expression at least puts him in Evan’s musical ball park, and Evans,in turn, seems to be inspired by Steig’s breathy and adventurous solos.
The original album was tough to find, so this reissue is very welcome, particularly with so few jazz flautists currently active. Highly recommended.

Tracks:
01 – Straight No Chaser
02 – Lover Man
03 – What’s New
04 – Autumn Leaves
05 – Time Out for Chris
06 – Spartacus Love Theme
07 – So What

Personnel:
Jeremy Steig – flute
Bill Evans – piano
Eddie Gomez – bass
Marty Morrell – drums

Recorded at Webster Hall, N.Y.C., on Jan. 30, Feb. 3, 4, 5 and March 11, 1969

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Hank Jones (Great Jazz Trio with Strings) – N.Y. Sophisticate “A Tribute to Duke Ellington” {DENON}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

Hank Jones is one of the most gifted jazz pianists of the second half of the 20th century, and this salute to Duke Ellington is only slightly blemished by the sometimes overbearing string arrangements by Masahiko Satoh. His trio, with bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Jimmy Cobb, sticks to familiar selections from the vast Ellington songbook, with Jones occasionally switching to a Fender Rhodes electric piano or celeste. Happily the strings are omitted from cookers such as “C Jam Blues” and “Take the ‘A’ Train.” Worth searching for.

Tracks:
01 – In a Sentimental Mood
02 – C Jam Blues
03 – Mood Indigo
04 – Satin Doll
05 – Lush Life
06 – Sophisticated Lady
07 – Take The “A” Train
08 – I Got it Bad (and That Ain’t Good)
09 – Caravan
10 – Solitude

Personnel:
Hank Jones – piano
Eddie Gomez – bass
Jimmy Cobb – drums
etc

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Bill Evans Trio – I Will Say Goodbye {Fantasy}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

The title refers to the Michel Legrand piece performed twice on the date, and to the fact that pianist Bill Evans was on the verge of switching labels from Fantasy to Warner Bros. For his final Fantasy album, Evans, bassist Eddie G√≥mez, and drummer Eliot Zigmund perform memorable renditions of such songs as Herbie Hancock’s “Dolphin Dance,” Johnny Mandel’s “Seascape,” and Burt Bacharach’s underrated “A House Is Not a Home.” The CD reissue adds two additional selections (“Nobody Else But Me” and “Orson’s Theme”) from this excellent series of sessions. Fine post-bop music from an influential piano giant.

Tracks:
01 – I Will Say Goodbye
02 – Dolphin Dance
03 – Seascape
04 – Peau Douce
05 – Nobody Else But Me
06 – I Will Say Goodbye (take 2)
07 – The Opener
08 – Quiet Light
09 – A House is Not a Home
10 – Orson’s Theme

Personnel:
Bill Evans – piano
Eddie Gomez – bass
Eliot Zigmund – drums

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Hank Jones (Great Jazz Trio) – Monk’s Moods {DENON}


Hank Jones has been known to be a quintessential sideman and occasional leader during his lengthy career as a premier jazz pianist. His most frequent project has been as the ostensible leader of the co-op group known as the Great Jazz Trio, a classic example of how the piano-bass-drums format has remained timeless, enduring, and ever challenging. Formed in the spring of 1975, the initial threesome performed together for the first time at the Village Vanguard nightclub in New York City for one week, was given its name by owner Max Gordon, and consisted of Jones, drummer Tony Williams, and bassist Ron Carter. These musicians from three generations with ties to Miles Davis formed a unique bond playing standards and originals of each bandmember. The trio got together again in May of 1976, and this time headed for a studio to record an album with Japanese alto saxophonist Sadao Watanabe, resulting in the album I’m Old Fashioned. In February of 1977 the trio was again booked in the Village Vanguard for a week, and they recorded three days of the extended engagement, making several live volumes of their music available on vinyl for the Japanese based East Wind label, issued in the U.S. on Inner City. Concurrent studio efforts including Love for Sale (1976,) Kindness, Joy, Love & Happiness, and Direct from LA (1977,) and Milestones (1978) cemented the reputation of the original combo. The Japanese continued their interest in booking the group for concert tours, and documenting the music of the GJT, with many more releases on East Wind and Denon only available as imports in the new CD era up to 2008, with another string of Great Standards, Vol. I-V for Alfa Jazz. Many of the recordings used cover art surrounding Major League Baseball images, especially action photos with the Boston Red Sox (Williams was born in Boston, as opposed to Metro-Detroiters Jones and Carter) the most famous being pitcher Roger Moret on the cover of the 1978 LP At the Village Vanguard. Since the passing of Tony Williams and Ron Carter’s increased interest in a solo career, the personnel of the Great Jazz Trio has changed, but Hank Jones has always spearheaded the effort. Among some of the partners the pianist has employed; bassists Buster Williams, Eddie Gomez, John Patitucci, and Richard Davis, along with drummers Al Foster, Elvin Jones, and Jack DeJohnette. The band in one configuration or another has lasted over four decades, recording on average one album per year.
This album recorded in 1984 is a tribute to one of the great Jazz pianists, Thelonious Monk.

Tracks:
01 – Round About Midnight
02 – Blue Monk
03 – Bemsha Swing
04 – Misterioso
05 – I Mean You
06 – Ruby My Dear
07 – Monk’s Dream
08 – Jackie-Ing
09 – Monk’s Mood

Personnel:
Hank Jones – piano, arrangements
Eddie Gomez – bass
Jimmy Cobb – drums
Terumasa Nino – cornet (#1, 5)

Recorded and mixed at Nippon Columbia Studio, Tokyo
in August, September and October, 1984.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork