John Pizzarelli – My Blue Heaven {Chesky} “digital dL_2_cd”


Review by Scott Yanow ~allmusic.com
Just prior to signing with RCA/Novus, John Pizzarelli recorded two sets for Chesky that featured him playing in the swing style that he would soon make quite popular. Although joined by all-stars (pianist Dave McKenna, bassist Milt Hinton, drummer Connie Kay, his father, guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli, and flugelhornist Clark Terry) rather than his regular trio, Pizzarelli’s likable vocals and relaxed guitar solos are not overshadowed. In fact, this is a delightful date, with memorable renditions of such songs as “I’m An Errand Boy for Rhythm,” “Lady Be Good,” “The Best Man,” “Gee Baby Ain’t I Good to You” and “Candy.” Easily recommended to John Pizzarelli fans.

Tracklist:
01. My Blue Heaven (4:02)
02. I’m an Errand Boy for Rhythm (3:49)
03. It Could Happen to You (3:25)
04. Lady Be Good (8:05)
05. The Touch of Your Lips (2:35)
06. Can’t Take You Nowhere (4:08)
07. Take My Smile (2:54)
08. That’s What (3:04)
09. Stray Horn (2:44)
10. Best Man (2:48)
11. Oh Me, Oh My, Oh Gosh (3:27)
12. Don’t Get Around Much Anymore (3:13)
13. Gee Baby Ain’t I Good to You (3:19)
14. Passion Flower (4:14)
15. Zoot Walked In / Morning Fun (4:28)
16. Candy (3:38)

Personnel:
John Pizzarelli – guitar & vocals
Dave McKenna – piano
Bucky Pizzarelli – guitar
Clark Terry – trumpet
Milt Hinton – bass
Connie Kay – drums

Recorded at RCA Studio A, New York City; on February 6 & 7, 1990

Genre: Jazz
Style: Swing, Standards
Label: Chesky / hdtracks.com
Year: 1990
Time: 59:51

* Original source was a digital download in 24bit-96kHz; and this share is a self-made imitation CD (converted to redbook standard, 16bit-44.1kHz); which can easily be burned as an “Audio-CD” to an empty media.

Jimmy Smith & Wes Montgomery – Further Adventures of Jimmy & Wes {Verve} ”Japan”


Review by Richard S. Ginell (allmusic.com)

Further Adventures of Jimmy and Wes picks up where Dynamic Duo left off, digging a little further into the one-time-only Wes Montgomery/Jimmy Smith sessions and coming up with more fine music — mellower in general than Dynamic Duo but first-class nonetheless. Unlike most of the studio sessions from this time, Montgomery gets plenty of room for his single-string work as well as his famous octaves, and both techniques find him in full, mature bloom, needing fewer notes in which to say more (Smith, of course, is precisely the opposite). All but one of the tracks on the original LP find Smith and Montgomery interacting only with themselves, the drums of Grady Tate, and the congas of Ray Barretto; Roger Miller’s “King of the Road” (not often covered by jazzers) and Montgomery’s “O.G.D.” (later known as “Road Song”) come off best. Oliver Nelson’s big band makes a sole appearance with a swaggering chart of “Milestones.” Though Dynamic Duo is probably the priority purchase by a hairsbreadth margin, you’ll need to have both that album and Further Adventures eventually.

Tracks:
01 – King of the Road
02 – Maybe September
03 – OGD
04 – Call Me
05 – Milestones
06 – Mellow Mood

Personnel:
Jimmy Smith – organ
Wes Montgomery – guitar
Grady Tate – drums
Richard Davis – bass
Ray Barretto – percussion

Bob Ashton, Danny Bank, Jerry Dodgion, Jerome Richardson, Phil Woods – woodwinds
Jimmy Maxwell, Joe Newman, Ernie Royal, Clark Terry – trumpets
Jimmy Cleveland, Quentin Jackson, Melba Liston – trombones
Tony Studd – bass trombone

Recorded on September 21 and 28, 1966
Year: 2004

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

{re-uploaded}

Ernestine Anderson – My Kinda Swing {Mercury}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)

Ernestine Anderson was 32 years old at the time of this 1960 session, not long before her career inexplicably fell into the doldrums. This album finds her in great form, supported by a cast of musicians including Clark Terry, Hank Jones, Yusef Lateef, Ernie Royal, Frank Rehak, and Kenny Burrell, with terrific arrangements by Ernie Wilkins. She achieves the perfect balance in her interpretation of “Trouble Is a Man,” a masterful ballad written by Alec Wilder, and she’s clearly in her element in the hard-rocking blues “See See Rider.” Terry’s striking trumpet almost provides a contrasting vocal alongside Anderson during “All My Life,” while her understated approach to a quick run through “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)” showcases Jones and Burrell. Lateef’s oboe adds to the exotic flavor of “Lazy Afternoon.”

Tracks:
01 – My Kinda Love
02 – Trouble is a Man
03 – See See Rider
04 – Moonlight in Vermont
05 – Land of Dreams
06 – Black Moonlight
07 – All My Life
08 – Mound Bayou
09 – I’ll Never Be the Same
10 – It Don’t Mean a Thing (if it Ain’t Got That Swing)
11 – Lazy Afternoon
12 – They Didn’t Believe Me

Personnel:
Ernestine Anderson – vocals, with Ernie Wilkins’s Orchestra including:
Ernie Royal, Clark Terry – trumpet
Frank Rehak – trombone
Yusef Lateef – tenor sax, flute, oboe
Tate Houston – baritone sax
Mac Ceppos – violin
Hank Jones – piano
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Art Davis – bass
Willie Rodriguez – percussion
Charlie Persip – drums
Ernie Wilkins – arranger & conductor

Recorded late 1960 in New York City.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans

Gene Ammons – Late Hour Special {Fantasy} “Russian Print”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Originally released by Prestige while tenor saxophonist Gene Ammons was serving a long prison sentence for possession of drugs (the label effectively kept Ammons’ name alive by regularly coming out with “new” material), this album was reissued on CD in 1997. The distinctive tenor is heard on three numbers with a quartet/quintet also including pianist Patti Bown, bassist George Duvivier, drummer Walter Perkins, and sometimes Ray Barretto on conga, and on four cuts as part of a ten-piece group arranged by Oliver Nelson. Flugelhornist Clark Terry gets a couple of choruses on “Things Ain’t What They Used to Be,” and Bown has several solos, but Ammons is the main star throughout. In addition to performing his own “Lascivious” (a blues), he sticks to standards, infusing each tune with soul and swing. A fine outing, although with brief (35 & 1/2 minutes) playing time.

Tracks:
01 – The Party’s Over
02 – I Want to Be Loved (But by Only You)
03 – Things Ain’t What They Used to Be
04 – Lascivious
05 – Makin’ Whoopee
06 – Soft Winds
07 – Lullaby of the Leaves

Personnel:
Gene Ammons – tenor saxophone
George Barrow, Red Holloway – tenor saxophone
Oliver Nelson – alto saxophone, arranger & conductor
Bob Ashton – baritone saxophone
Clark Terry, Hobart Dotson – trumpet
Patti Bown, Richard Wyands – piano
George Duvivier, Wendell Marshall – bass
Walter Perkins, Bill English – drums
Ray Barretto – conga

Recorded in Englewood Cliffs, NJ; on June 13, 1961 and April 13, 1962.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson – The More I See You {TELARC}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

After Oscar Peterson suffered a severe stroke in the spring of 1993, it was feared that he would never again play on a professional level, but two years of intense therapy resulted in the masterful pianist returning to what sounds, on this Telarc CD, like near-prime form. For the all-star date, The More I See You, Peterson tears into seven standards and two blues and outswings all potential competitors. Altoist Benny Carter at 87 sounds like he is 47 (if Carter had retired back in 1940 he would still be a legend), and flugelhornist Clark Terry (here 74) proves to be not only (along with the remarkable 90-year-old Doc Cheatham) the finest trumpeter over 70 but one of the top brassmen of any age. The cool-toned guitarist Lorne Lofsky and drummer Lewis Nash are also strong assets while bassist Ray Brown (a year younger than Peterson at a mere 68) displays his typical limitless energy on appealing tunes such as “In a Mellow Tone,” “When My Dream Boat Comes Home,” and a medium/up-tempo version of “For All We Know.” The musicians all play up to their usual high level, making this a joyous comeback album for the great Oscar Peterson.

Tracks:
01 – In a Mellow Tone
02 – Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good to You
03 – On the Trail
04 – When My Dream Boat Comes Home
05 – Ron’s Blues
06 – For All We Know
07 – Blues for Lisa
08 – Squatty Roo
09 – The More I See You

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Benny Carter – alto saxophone
Clark Terry – trumpet & flugelhorn
Ray Brown – bass
Lorne Lofsky – guitar
Lewis Nash – drums

Released on 1995 by Telarc Distribution.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans