Coleman Hawkins – In a Mellow Tone {Prestige}[OJC]


Review from “cduniverse.com”
Few jazz giants have been as important and as relevant for as long as the Bean, a revealing nickname; it’s apparently a contraction of “the best and only.” Hawkins received this appellation during his tenure with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. The saxophonist’s gruff yet mellifluous, smoky yet coarse tone influenced generations of musicians.

This compilation features music from Hawkins’ years with Prestige Records. Filled with many exciting and tranquil moments, IN A MELLOW TONE captures a great period in the saxophonist’s forty-plus year career. The album’s opener, “You Blew Out the Flame In My Heart” displays Hawkins’ ability to swing with a light buoyant feel, while ballads such as “I Want to Be Loved,” “Greensleeves,” “Then I’ll be Tired of You,” and “Until the Real Thing Comes Along” show the degree of delicacy and intimacy of which Hawkins was capable. Finally, the album’s title track brims with energy and verve, due in large part to Gus Johnson’s crisp drumming.

Tracklist:
01 – You Blew Out the Flame in My Heart
02 – I Want to Be Loved
03 – In a Mellow Tone
04 – Greensleeves
05 – Through for the Night
06 – Until the Real Thing Comes Along
07 – The Sweetest Sounds
08 – Then I’ll Be Tired of You
09 – Jammin’ in Swingville

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis – tenor sax
Hilton Jefferson – alto sax
Jimmy Hamilton – clarinet
Vic Dickenson, J.C. Higginbotham – trombone
Joe Thomas, Charlie Shavers, Joe Newman – trumpet
Tommy Flanagan, Red Garland, Ray Bryant – piano
Kenny Burrell, Tiny Grimes – guitar
Wendell Marshall, Doug Watkins, Ron Carter, George Duvivier, Major Jolley – bass
Osie Johnson, Charles “Specs” Wright, Gus Johnson, Eddie Locke, Bill English – drums

Recorded between November 7, 1958 – March 30, 1962;
at Hackensack, NJ (#2, 4, 5 and 6); and Englewood Cliffs, NJ (#1, 3, 7, 8 and 9)

Label: Prestige – OJC
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream Jazz, Saxophone

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Charlie Parker – Jam Session {Verve}


Review by “Jazzcat Stef” (amazon.com)

This is an absolutly marvellous example of what Jazz was and still should be (not because it’s more mainstream than bebop, in any case I love them both). The joy of playing with friends on common grounds, the standards and blues repertoire. I think I own everything Bird has ever played/released or at least I come really near. All the Dial, Savoy, Verve, Benedetti recordings, Bird’s Eyes, Live & Broadcasts, Blue Note concerts, recent discoveries, almost everything (more than 150 cds). This album cannot be considered a pure Bird album because he shared the scene with a lot of other sax stars which gave the session a different feeling from a lot of Bird’s records. I mean that this album is more Jazz “the Kansas City way” than bebop. It is a session more traditional than bebop. The only true beboppers are Bird, Kessel and Peterson (and Brown of course). The others, Webster, Hodges, Carter etc are more traditional than strictly bebop so the overall sound is more on that side of course. But it’s not a complaint, only an obvious consideration. The album is really fresh and entertaining, you can compar eit to a lot of JATP sessions in a sense. So it’s not a “revolutionary” album, not one that set a standard or that marked a change in Jazz history, nevertheless it’s essential in its way. It is a perect representation of what Jazz was more at Lester Young time than Bird time, but it’s very very good. It deserves 5 stars absolutly. Every player shined here and found his time to strecht out and show his bags of tricks fully. One of the highlights is the comping by Oscar Peterson swing machine which gave to the session a fabolous imprinting. The program is damn good. Two very long blues tunes, a very beautiful standard (“What is this thing” one of the standards I love the most) and a ballad medley. Fantastic! And even if Bird is playing more or less his usual cliches and nothing more, he’s still Bird! I love this album, for real. Buy it, you will love it for years and years too.

Tracks:
01 – Jam Blues
02 – What is This Thing Called Love
03 – Ballad Medley:
a) All the Things You Are
b) Dearly Beloved
c) The Nearness of You
d) I’ll Get By
e) Everything Happens to Me
f) The Man I Love
g) What’s New
h) Someone to Watch Over Me
i) Isn’t it Romantic?
04 – Funky Blues

Personnel:
Charlie Shavers, Benny Carter, Charlie Parker, Johnny Hodges – alto sax
Flip Phillips, Ben Webster – tenor sax
Oscar Peterson – piano
Barney Kessel – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
J.C. Heard – drums

Recorded July, 1952; Los Angeles.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork