Hank Mobley – A Caddy for Daddy {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Hank Mobley was a perfect artist for Blue Note in the 1960s. A distinctive but not dominant soloist, Mobley was also a very talented writer whose compositions avoided the predictable yet could often be quite melodic and soulful; his tricky originals consistently inspired the young all-stars in Blue Note’s stable. For this CD, which is a straight reissue of a 1965 session, Mobley is joined by trumpeter Lee Morgan, trombonist Curtis Fuller, pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Bob Cranshaw, and drummer Billy Higgins (a typically remarkable Blue Note lineup) for the infectious title cut, three other lesser-known but superior originals, plus Wayne Shorter’s “Venus Di Mildew.” Recommended.

Tracks:
01 – A Caddy for Daddy
02 – The Morning After
03 – Venus Di Mildew
04 – Ace Deuce Trey
05 – 3rd Time Around

Personnel:
Lee Morgan – trumpet
Curtis Fuller – trombone
Hank Mobley – tenor sax
McCoy Tyner – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Billy Higgins – drums

Originally released in 1966 on Blue Note Records as BST-84230.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

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Coleman Hawkins – Sirius {Pablo}[OJC]


Review by “fluffy” – amazon.com

I’ve seen this album both ripped and praised throughout the years in various music books. Back around 1979, my first Rolling Stone record guide gave it a 5 star rating (their highest rating). My copy (3rd edition) of all music guide to jazz gives it a one star rating (their lowest rating), calling it rather sad (Mr.Hawkins performances being hindered by failing health). so who is right? Well, if you remove soul from the equation, deny the spirit of a genius, and look merely at technique (a sort of “american idol” approach to music), then Mr.hawkins is no match here for the powerhouse of a young man that he was on his instrument back in the 20’s, 30’s, and 40’s. But, if you take into account the seasoned spirit of a soul who spent a lifetime acquainted with the magic and heart of his craft, then this is a beautiful, beautiful album. I have listened to this thing with a music lovers ecstasy during dozens and dozens of nights over the years, and still am in love with the sound. His gorgeous sugary tone is like a drug on my ears. This is simply one of the most moving ballad albums of jazz playing that I have heard. Forget technique. Listen. There’s a lifetime of love for jazz to be heard in Mr.Hawkins’ every breathe as it becomes one with his saxophone. Completely moving. Great stuff. Don’t let any fool hung-up on technique tell you otherwise.

Tracklist:
01 – The Man I Love
02 – Don’t Blame Me
03 – Just a Gigolo
04 – The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)
05 – Time on My Hands (You in My Arms)
06 – Sweet and Lovely
07 – Exactly Like You
08 – Street of Dreams
09 – Sugar (That Sugar Baby o’Mine)

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins – tenor saxophone
Barry Harris – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Eddie Locke – drums

Recorded in New York; December 20, 1966

(eac, flac, cue, log, artwork)

Horace Silver – Cape Verdean Blues {Blue Note}[xrcd]


Review by Steve Huey (allmusic.com)

After the success of Song for My Father and its hit title cut, Horace Silver was moved to pay further tribute to his dad, not to mention connect with some of his roots. Silver’s father was born in the island nation of Cape Verde (near West Africa) before emigrating to the United States, and that’s the inspiration behind The Cape Verdean Blues. Not all of the tracks are directly influenced by the music of Cape Verde (though some do incorporate Silver’s taste for light exoticism); however, there’s a spirit of adventure that pervades the entire album, a sense of exploration that wouldn’t have been quite the same with Silver’s quintet of old. On average, the tracks are longer than usual, and the lineup — featuring tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson (a holdover from the Song for My Father sessions) and trumpeter Woody Shaw — is one of the most modernist-leaning Silver ever recorded with. They push Silver into more advanced territory than he was normally accustomed to working, with mild dissonances and (especially in Henderson’s case) a rawer edge to the playing. What’s more, bop trombone legend J.J. Johnson appears on half of the six tracks, and Silver sounds excited to finally work with a collaborator he’d been pursuing for some time. Johnson ably handles some of the album’s most challenging material, like the moody, swelling “Bonita” and the complex, up-tempo rhythms of “Nutville.” Most interesting, though, is the lilting title track, which conjures the flavor of the islands with a blend of Latin-tinged rhythms and calypso melodies that nonetheless don’t sound quite Caribbean in origin. Also noteworthy are “The African Queen,” with its blend of emotional power and drifting hints of freedom, and “Pretty Eyes,” Silver’s first original waltz. Yet another worthwhile Silver album.

Tracks:
01 – The Cape Verdean Blues
02 – The African Queen
03 – Pretty Eyes
04 – Nutville
05 – Bonita
06 – Mo’ Joe

Personnel:
Woody Shaw – trumpet
J. J. Johnson – trombone
Joe Henderson – tenor sax
Horace Silver – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Roger Humphries – drums

Recorded 1 & 25, 1965, at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Wes Montgomery – Bumpin’ {Verve} “Master Edition”


Review by Shawn M. Haney (allmusic.com)

Taking the listener on a smoother, rather than bumpier, ride down the moonlight highway of jazz is Wes Montgomery, a chief architect of the world’s guitar virtuoso scene. Not only is his brilliant command of the six-string present here, so is the vivid color tones of notes and blue notes played between. Backed up by a hauntingly beautiful and mesmerizing orchestra conducted and arranged by Don Sebesky, the music almost lifts the listener off his feet into a dreamy, water-like landscape. The atmosphere is serene and enchanting, such as a romantic evening for two under starlight, and certainly a romantic eve merits the accompaniment of this record. The sounds are soft, smooth, and silky, and Montgomery addresses full leadership of his graceful melodic style, fronting close to 20 members of a orchestra perhaps best described resonant and sweeping. So too are the sweeping note flows of Montgomery’s guitar, and his surprising fluidness towards the art of comping, a necessary trait of the jazz guitar virtuoso. Even the unforgettable Jim Hall can be tickled and intrigued through a listen of these influential records, as for all amateur and professional guitar musicians. “A Quiet Thing” is perhaps the most somber, peaceful, and smooth piece on the record, demonstrating Montgomery’s love of quiet, and how much the idea of not playing at all brings music to the listeners. The charming sounds of orchestral violas, violins, cellos, and harp are sent ablaze to create a pleasant atmosphere, either for a quick morning get up, get ready for work, or evening dining setting. “Here’s That Rainy Day” is an up-tempo bossa nova tune that resonates with Montgomery’s enticing chordal changes and blissful phrasing, not to mention the blend of harp and strings lays the groundwork for a perfect rainy day inside, with drops pattering at the windows and fires aglow. The recording engineer did a wonderful job with this album. The sound quality is clear and lush, and, overall, this collection of mid-’60s cool jazz is a delight to listen too, once and again.

Tracks:
01 – Bumpin’
02 – Tear it Down
03 – A Quiet Thing
04 – Con Alma
05 – The Shadow of Your Smile
06 – Mi Cosa
07 – Here’s That Rainy Day
08 – Musty
09 – Just Walkin’
10 – My One and Only Love
11 – Just Walkin’ (previously unissued)

Personnel:
Wes Montgomery – guitar, with Arnold Eidus, Lewis Eley, Paul Gershman, Louis Haber,
Julius Held, Harry Lookofsky, Joe Malignaggi, Gene Orloff, Sol Shapiro (violing);
Harold Coletta, David Schwartz (viola); Charles McCracken, George Ricci (cello);
Margaret Ross (harp); Roger Kellaway (piano); Bob Cranshaw (bass); Grady Tate (drums);
Don Sebesky (arranger, conductor)

On tracks 3 and 4; Helcio Milito (drums), replaces Grady Tate.

Recorded 1965 at Van Gelder Recording Studio, ENglewood Cliffs, New Jersey; tracks 7-9 and 11 on
May 16; tracks 2 and 5 on May 18; tracks 3 and 4 on May 19; and tracks 1, 6 and 10 on May 20.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Lee Morgan – The Sidewinder {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Stacia Proefrock (allmusic.com)

Carried by its almost impossibly infectious eponymous opening track, The Sidewinder helped foreshadow the sounds of boogaloo and soul-jazz with its healthy R&B influence and Latin tinge. While the rest of the album retreats to a more conventional hard bop sound, Morgan’s compositions are forward-thinking and universally solid. Only 25 at the time of its release, Morgan was accomplished (and perhaps cocky) enough to speak of mentoring the great Joe Henderson, who at 26 was just beginning to play dates with Blue Note after getting out of the military. Henderson makes a major contribution to the album, especially on “Totem Pole,” where his solos showed off his singular style, threatening to upstage Morgan, who is also fairly impressive here. Barry Harris, Bob Cranshaw, and Billy Higgins are all in good form throughout the album as well, and the group works together seamlessly to create an album that crackles with energy while maintaining a stylish flow.

Tracks:
01 – The Sidewinder
02 – Totem Pole
03 – Gary’s Notebook
04 – Boy, What a Night
05 – Hocus-Pocus
06 – Totem Pole (alternate)

Personnel:
Lee Morgan – trumpet
Joe Henderson – tenor sax
Barry Harris – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Billy Higgins – drums

Originally released in 1964 on Blue Note as BST-84157

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork