Charlie Parker – Jam Session {Verve}


Review by “Jazzcat Stef” (amazon.com)

This is an absolutly marvellous example of what Jazz was and still should be (not because it’s more mainstream than bebop, in any case I love them both). The joy of playing with friends on common grounds, the standards and blues repertoire. I think I own everything Bird has ever played/released or at least I come really near. All the Dial, Savoy, Verve, Benedetti recordings, Bird’s Eyes, Live & Broadcasts, Blue Note concerts, recent discoveries, almost everything (more than 150 cds). This album cannot be considered a pure Bird album because he shared the scene with a lot of other sax stars which gave the session a different feeling from a lot of Bird’s records. I mean that this album is more Jazz “the Kansas City way” than bebop. It is a session more traditional than bebop. The only true beboppers are Bird, Kessel and Peterson (and Brown of course). The others, Webster, Hodges, Carter etc are more traditional than strictly bebop so the overall sound is more on that side of course. But it’s not a complaint, only an obvious consideration. The album is really fresh and entertaining, you can compar eit to a lot of JATP sessions in a sense. So it’s not a “revolutionary” album, not one that set a standard or that marked a change in Jazz history, nevertheless it’s essential in its way. It is a perect representation of what Jazz was more at Lester Young time than Bird time, but it’s very very good. It deserves 5 stars absolutly. Every player shined here and found his time to strecht out and show his bags of tricks fully. One of the highlights is the comping by Oscar Peterson swing machine which gave to the session a fabolous imprinting. The program is damn good. Two very long blues tunes, a very beautiful standard (“What is this thing” one of the standards I love the most) and a ballad medley. Fantastic! And even if Bird is playing more or less his usual cliches and nothing more, he’s still Bird! I love this album, for real. Buy it, you will love it for years and years too.

Tracks:
01 – Jam Blues
02 – What is This Thing Called Love
03 – Ballad Medley:
a) All the Things You Are
b) Dearly Beloved
c) The Nearness of You
d) I’ll Get By
e) Everything Happens to Me
f) The Man I Love
g) What’s New
h) Someone to Watch Over Me
i) Isn’t it Romantic?
04 – Funky Blues

Personnel:
Charlie Shavers, Benny Carter, Charlie Parker, Johnny Hodges – alto sax
Flip Phillips, Ben Webster – tenor sax
Oscar Peterson – piano
Barney Kessel – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
J.C. Heard – drums

Recorded July, 1952; Los Angeles.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Oscar Peterson – The More I See You {TELARC}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

After Oscar Peterson suffered a severe stroke in the spring of 1993, it was feared that he would never again play on a professional level, but two years of intense therapy resulted in the masterful pianist returning to what sounds, on this Telarc CD, like near-prime form. For the all-star date, The More I See You, Peterson tears into seven standards and two blues and outswings all potential competitors. Altoist Benny Carter at 87 sounds like he is 47 (if Carter had retired back in 1940 he would still be a legend), and flugelhornist Clark Terry (here 74) proves to be not only (along with the remarkable 90-year-old Doc Cheatham) the finest trumpeter over 70 but one of the top brassmen of any age. The cool-toned guitarist Lorne Lofsky and drummer Lewis Nash are also strong assets while bassist Ray Brown (a year younger than Peterson at a mere 68) displays his typical limitless energy on appealing tunes such as “In a Mellow Tone,” “When My Dream Boat Comes Home,” and a medium/up-tempo version of “For All We Know.” The musicians all play up to their usual high level, making this a joyous comeback album for the great Oscar Peterson.

Tracks:
01 – In a Mellow Tone
02 – Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good to You
03 – On the Trail
04 – When My Dream Boat Comes Home
05 – Ron’s Blues
06 – For All We Know
07 – Blues for Lisa
08 – Squatty Roo
09 – The More I See You

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Benny Carter – alto saxophone
Clark Terry – trumpet & flugelhorn
Ray Brown – bass
Lorne Lofsky – guitar
Lewis Nash – drums

Released on 1995 by Telarc Distribution.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans

Benny Carter – A Gentleman and His Music {Concord}


Review by Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

For this 1985 session, altoist Benny Carter (then a week short of turning 78 years old) is teamed with the lyrical trumpeter Joe Wilder and the Concord All-Stars, a contingent that also features tenor saxophonist Scott Hamilton, guitarist Ed Bickert and pianist Gene Harris. The results are predictably excellent with the septet swinging with spirit and creativity on four standards, a blues and Carter’s original “A Kiss from You.” This album is well worth tracking down.

Tracks:
01 – Sometimes I’m Happy
02 – A Kiss from You
03 – Blues for George
04 – Things Ain’t What They Used to Be
05 – Lover Man
06 – Idaho

Personnel:
Benny Carter – alto saxophone
Joe Wilder – trumpet and flugelhorn
Scott Hamilton – tenor saxophone
Ed Bickert – guitar
Gene Harris – piano
John Clayton – bass
Jimmie Smith – drums

Recorded at Coast Recorders, San Francisco, California, August 1985

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork