Hank Mobley – Jazz Message of Hank Mobley, Volume.2 {Savoy} “mono”


Review by Jim Todd (allmusic.com)

Impressive lineups, both in the front line and the rhythm section, fuel the two 1956 sessions on this Savoy reissue. The players are committed, the writing is good, and the performances reward repeated listening. The result is a worthwhile precursor to the industry-standard hard bop Mobley would later record for Blue Note.Lee Morgan, then 18, joins Mobley on two tracks that have pianist Hank Jones, bassist Doug Watkins, and drummer Art Taylor in the rhythm section. Even if Morgan at this time was audibly still growing as a trumpet player, his poise, execution, and resourceful imagination were already the tools of a master. Donald Byrd, on form and playing with crispness and authority, moves into the trumpet chair for the three remaining tracks. This time it’s Barry Harris on piano, Kenny Clarke on drums, and Watkins (again) on bass. The influence on Mobley of swing era tenors, from Lester Young to Illinois Jacquet, can be clearly heard on these tracks. Mobley’s respect for and understanding of the pre-bebop style serve him well in his contribution to the development of the predominant jazz style that followed bebop. In addition to three Mobley originals, there is a blues by Thad Jones and another from Watkins. The standout track is Mobley’s “Space Flight,” a bright, up-tempo bop number that has memorable solos from Mobley, Byrd, Harris, and Clarke. The recording on this CD is very good but, as is common on Savoy reissues, the running time isn’t long — 32 minutes in the case of this jazz message.

Tracks:
01 – Thad’s Blues
02 – Doug’s Minor B’ Ok”
03 – B. for B.B.
04 – Blues Number Two
05 – Space Flight

Personnel:
Hank Mobley – tenor saxophone
Lee Morgan, Donald Byrd – trumpet
Hank Jones, Barry Harris – piano
Doug Watkins – bass
Art Taylor, Kenny Clarke – drums

Recorded on November 7 and July 23; 1956

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Barry Harris at the Jazz Workshop {Riverside}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Pianist Barry Harris’ second recording as a leader (he led a set for Argo in 1958) finds him at the age of 30 playing in the same boppish style he would have throughout his career. Teamed up with bassist Sam Jones and drummer Louis Hayes, this live CD reissue (which adds three alternate takes to the original LP program) is an excellent example of Harris’ playing. Highlights of the enthusiastic straight-ahead set (which includes three obscure but worthy originals by the pianist) include “Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby,” “Moose the Mooche” and “Woody’N You.”

Tracks:
01 – Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby (take 2)
02 – Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby (previously unissued-take 1)
03 – Curtain Call
04 – Star Eyes
05 – Moose the Mooche
06 – Lolita
07 – Morning Coffee
08 – Don’t Blame Me (take 2)
09 – Don’t Blame Me (previously unissued-take 1)
10 – Woody’n You (take 2)
11 – Woody’n You (previously unissued-take 1)

Personnel:
Barry Harris – piano
Sam Jones – bass
Louis Hayes – drums

Recorded live at The Jazz Workshop, San Francisco; May 15 and 16, 1960.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Coleman Hawkins – Sirius {Pablo}[OJC]


Review by “fluffy” – amazon.com

I’ve seen this album both ripped and praised throughout the years in various music books. Back around 1979, my first Rolling Stone record guide gave it a 5 star rating (their highest rating). My copy (3rd edition) of all music guide to jazz gives it a one star rating (their lowest rating), calling it rather sad (Mr.Hawkins performances being hindered by failing health). so who is right? Well, if you remove soul from the equation, deny the spirit of a genius, and look merely at technique (a sort of “american idol” approach to music), then Mr.hawkins is no match here for the powerhouse of a young man that he was on his instrument back in the 20’s, 30’s, and 40’s. But, if you take into account the seasoned spirit of a soul who spent a lifetime acquainted with the magic and heart of his craft, then this is a beautiful, beautiful album. I have listened to this thing with a music lovers ecstasy during dozens and dozens of nights over the years, and still am in love with the sound. His gorgeous sugary tone is like a drug on my ears. This is simply one of the most moving ballad albums of jazz playing that I have heard. Forget technique. Listen. There’s a lifetime of love for jazz to be heard in Mr.Hawkins’ every breathe as it becomes one with his saxophone. Completely moving. Great stuff. Don’t let any fool hung-up on technique tell you otherwise.

Tracklist:
01 – The Man I Love
02 – Don’t Blame Me
03 – Just a Gigolo
04 – The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)
05 – Time on My Hands (You in My Arms)
06 – Sweet and Lovely
07 – Exactly Like You
08 – Street of Dreams
09 – Sugar (That Sugar Baby o’Mine)

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins – tenor saxophone
Barry Harris – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Eddie Locke – drums

Recorded in New York; December 20, 1966

(eac, flac, cue, log, artwork)

Coleman Hawkins – Wrapped Tight {impulse!}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Hawkins’s last strong recording finds the veteran, 43 years after his recording debut with Mamie Smith’s Jazz Hounds, improvising creatively on a wide variety of material on this CD, ranging from “Intermezzo” and “Here’s That Rainy Day” to “Red Roses for a Blue Lady” and “Indian Summer.” Best is an adventurous version of “Out of Nowhere” that shows that the tenor-saxophonist was still coming up with new ideas in 1965.

Tracks:
01 – Marcheta
02 – Intermezzo
03 – Wrapped Tight
04 – Red Roses for a Blue Lady
05 – She’s Fit
06 – Beautiful Girl
07 – And I Still Love You
08 – Bean’s Place
09 – Here’s That Rainy Day
10 – I Won’t Dance
11 – Indian Summer
12 – Out of Nowhere

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins – tenor saxophone
Bill Berry, Snooky Young – trumpet
Urbie Green – trombone
Barry Harris – piano
Buddy Catlett – bass
Eddie Locke – drums

Recorded February 22 (1 thru 6), and March 1 (7 thru 12), 1965
at Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Lee Morgan – The Sidewinder {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Stacia Proefrock (allmusic.com)

Carried by its almost impossibly infectious eponymous opening track, The Sidewinder helped foreshadow the sounds of boogaloo and soul-jazz with its healthy R&B influence and Latin tinge. While the rest of the album retreats to a more conventional hard bop sound, Morgan’s compositions are forward-thinking and universally solid. Only 25 at the time of its release, Morgan was accomplished (and perhaps cocky) enough to speak of mentoring the great Joe Henderson, who at 26 was just beginning to play dates with Blue Note after getting out of the military. Henderson makes a major contribution to the album, especially on “Totem Pole,” where his solos showed off his singular style, threatening to upstage Morgan, who is also fairly impressive here. Barry Harris, Bob Cranshaw, and Billy Higgins are all in good form throughout the album as well, and the group works together seamlessly to create an album that crackles with energy while maintaining a stylish flow.

Tracks:
01 – The Sidewinder
02 – Totem Pole
03 – Gary’s Notebook
04 – Boy, What a Night
05 – Hocus-Pocus
06 – Totem Pole (alternate)

Personnel:
Lee Morgan – trumpet
Joe Henderson – tenor sax
Barry Harris – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Billy Higgins – drums

Originally released in 1964 on Blue Note as BST-84157

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork