Miles Davis – Blue Miles {Columbia}


Review Review from cduniverse.com

With an artist as prolific and constantly evolving as Miles Davis, it would be futile to attempt a single CD compilation of his work without first selecting a theme to narrow things down. For BLUE MILES Columbia/Legacy has chosen a smart if unsurprising category: Miles playing tunes which, while not necessarily following the blues form per se, all evoke a kind of restless, after-hours, melancholy mood.
In drawing material from the years 1956-1967, this collection also provides a de facto cross section of Miles’ ensembles from perhaps the most fertile decade of his incredibly productive career. “Round Midnight” features the ’50s quintet that included Coltrane, Red Garland, Paul Chambers and Philly Joe Jones. “Blues for Pablo” and “The Pan Piper” are collaborations with Gil Evans, and “Blue in Green” comes from the groundbreaking KIND OF BLUE album. “Drad Dog,” with Hank Mobley on tenor and Wynton Kelly on piano, and “Basin St. Blues,” with George Coleman on tenor, are from the early ’60s, while “Circle” and “Sweet Pea” bring things up to the second classic quintet era.

Tracks:
01 – ‘Round Midnight
02 – Blues for Pablo
03 – Blue in Green
04 – The Pan Piper
05 – Drad Dog
06 – Basin Street Blues
07 – Circle
08 – Sweet Pea

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet, with John Coltrane, Philly Joe Jones, Wayne Shorter,
Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams.

Recorded between 1956 to 1967, compilation CD.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

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Miles Davis – Sketches of Spain [2CD]{Columbia} “Legacy Edition”


Review by Thom Jurek (allmusic.com)

More than likely, the serious Miles Davis fan has already bought Sketches of Spain in numerous editions before, from its original CD issue to two different remasters — and some have purchased it as part of the Miles Davis & Gil Evans: The Complete Columbia Studio Recordings box set as well. This 50th Anniversary Legacy Edition will more than likely be either for the serious Miles collector, or for a newcomer to the recordings of Davis and Evans. Since the single-CD issue of Sketches of Spain is still available, it remains to be seen who this 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition set — which contains no unreleased music — will appeal to; but it is a handsome issue and does contain a couple of nice bonuses to make it attractive. Along with the original album is a 70-minute bonus disc filled with alternate takes and extra tracks. There are four different takes of “Concerto de Arjanuez (Adagio),” including a two-part, alternate take version that lasts in total about 20 minutes; a stellar live version which is the only one that took place, and a brief alternate ending. In addition to other alternates of album pieces are “Maids of Cadiz,” which showcases the first Spanish composition that Evans adapted for Miles, and “Teo,” from the Someday My Prince Will Come sessions. It was included because of its symbiotic relationship to “Solea,” on Sketches of Spain. Also included on the bonus disc is a large .pdf file that is in essence a digital booklet with rare photos, press clippings, and previously unpublished documents related to the recordings sessions for the album. This version also comes with a new liner essay by Gunther Schuller. Again, the more casual Miles listener, and even the purchaser of his classic albums, may hesitate, but for the more serious jazz aficionado, it is somewhat revelatory to hear the bonus material prepared and sequenced in this context; and the extra digital booklet — given the attractive price of the set — makes it tough to resist.

Tracks – Disc One:
01 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)
02 – Will O’ the Wisp
03 – The Pan Piper
04 – Saeta
05 – Solea
06 – Song of Our Country

Tracks – Disc Two:
01 – Maids of Cadiz
02 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_rehearsal take, incomplete, w/o
03 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_alternate take, part one
04 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_alternate take, part two
05 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_alternate ending
06 – The Pan Piper (take 1)
07 – Song of Our Country_take 9, w/o intro
08 – Song of Our Country_take 14, slower tempo, w/o intro
09 – Saeta (full version of master)
10 – Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio)_live
11 – Teo

Personnel:
Miles Davis – fluegelhorn, trumpet
Gil Evans – arranger, conductor
Paul Chambers – bass
Jimmy Cobb, Art Taylor – drums
Elvin Jones – percussion
etc.

Recorded on May 6 & 27, 1957 and November 20, 1959 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, NYC

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Miles Davis – Kind of Blue “50th Anniversary Collector’s Edition” [2CD] {Columbia}


~wikipedia.org
Kind of Blue is a studio album by American jazz musician Miles Davis, released August 17, 1959, on Columbia Records in the United States. Recording sessions for the album took place at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio in New York City on March 2 and April 22, 1959. The sessions featured Davis’s ensemble sextet, which consisted of pianists Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly, drummer Jimmy Cobb, bassist Paul Chambers, and saxophonists John Coltrane and Julian “Cannonball” Adderley. After the inclusion of Bill Evans into his sextet, Davis followed up on the modal experimentations of Milestones (1958) and 1958 Miles (1958) by basing the album entirely on modality, in contrast to his earlier work with the hard bop style of jazz.

Though precise figures have been disputed, Kind of Blue has been cited by many music writers not only as Davis’s best-selling album, but as the best-selling jazz record of all time. On October 7, 2008, it was certified quadruple platinum in sales by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). It has been regarded by many critics as the greatest jazz album of all time and Davis’s masterpiece. The album’s influence on music, including jazz, rock, and classical music, has led music writers to acknowledge it as one of the most influential albums of all time. In 2002, it was one of fifty recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. In 2003, the album was ranked number 12 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine ~allmusic.com
Kind of Blue isn’t merely an artistic highlight for Miles Davis, it’s an album that towers above its peers, a record generally considered as the definitive jazz album, a universally acknowledged standard of excellence. Why does Kind of Blue posses such a mystique? Perhaps because this music never flaunts its genius. It lures listeners in with the slow, luxurious bassline and gentle piano chords of “So What.” From that moment on, the record never really changes pace — each tune has a similar relaxed feel, as the music flows easily. Yet Kind of Blue is more than easy listening. It’s the pinnacle of modal jazz — tonality and solos build from the overall key, not chord changes, giving the music a subtly shifting quality. All of this doesn’t quite explain why seasoned jazz fans return to this record even after they’ve memorized every nuance. They return because this is an exceptional band — Miles, Coltrane, Bill Evans, Cannonball Adderley, Paul Chambers, Jimmy Cobb — one of the greatest in history, playing at the peak of its power. As Evans said in the original liner notes for the record, the band did not play through any of these pieces prior to recording. Davis laid out the themes before the tape rolled, and then the band improvised. The end results were wondrous and still crackle with vitality. Kind of Blue works on many different levels. It can be played as background music, yet it amply rewards close listening. It is advanced music that is extraordinarily enjoyable. It may be a stretch to say that if you don’t like Kind of Blue, you don’t like jazz — but it’s hard to imagine it as anything other than a cornerstone of any jazz collection. [Legacy’s greatly expanded 50th Anniversary Collector’s Edition was issued in 2008.]

Tracklist, disc one:
01. So What (9:25)
02. Freddie Freeloader (9:49)
03. Blue in Green (5:38)
04. All Blues (11:36)
05. Flamenco Sketches (9:26)
06. Flamenco Sketches (alternate take) (9:34)
07. Freddie Freeloader – studio sequence 1 (0:53)
08. Freddie Freeloader – false start (1:28)
09. Freddie Freeloader – studio sequence 2 (1:31)
10. So What – studio sequence 1 (1:56)
11. So What – studio sequence 2 (0:14)
12. Blue in Green – studio sequence (1:59)
13. Flamenco Sketches – studio sequence 1 (0:45)
14. Flamenco Sketches – studio sequence 2 (1:12)
15. All Blues – studio sequence (0:19)

Tracklist, disc two:
01. On Green Dolphin Street (9:50)
02. Fran-Dance (5:50)
03. Stella by Starlight (4:47)
04. Love for Sale (11:49)
05. Fran-Dance (alternate take) (5:54)
06. So What (previously released in unauthorized form) (17:29)

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet
Cannonball Adderley – alto saxophone
John Coltrane – tenor saxophone
Wynton Kelly, Bill Evans – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Jimmy Cobb – drums

Recorded May 26, 1958 – Apr 9, 1960 at 30th Street Studio; New York
Produced by Teo Macero and Irving Townsend

Genre: Jazz
Style: Hard Bop, Post Bop
Label: Columbia – 50th Anniversary Collector’s Edition
Year: 2008
Time: 65:44 + 55:39

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + full artwork
Quality-2: mp3@320 + full artwork

Miles Davis Quartet – Musings of Miles {Riverside}[DCC] “mono”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Miles Davis was in the process of forming his first classic quintet when he recorded this date, a Prestige set reissued by the audiophile label DCC Compact Classics. The trumpeter is featured on a quartet outing with pianist Red Garland, bassist Oscar Pettiford, and drummer Philly Joe Jones, playing four standards plus a blues (“Green Haze”) and “I Didn’t,” his answer to Thelonious Monk’s “Well, You Needn’t.” Garland and Jones would soon be in Miles’ group, although the fiery Pettiford proved too difficult for the trumpeter to handle and was quickly succeeded by Paul Chambers. The interpretations are generally lyrical and melodic; even “A Night in Tunisia” sounds a bit mellow. Likable if not essential music.

Tracks:
01 – Will You Still Be Mine?
02 – I See Your Face Before Me
03 – I Didn’t
04 – A Gal in Calico
05 – A Night in Tunisia
06 – Green Haze

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet
Red Garland – piano
Oscar Pettiford – bass
Philly Joe Jones – drums

Recorded in Hackensack, New Jersey; June 7, 1955.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Miles Davis Quintet, “The New” – Miles {Prestige}[DCC] “mono”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Although they had made a few slightly earlier cuts that would later be issued on Columbia, the first full-length album by the Miles Davis Quintet is quite intriguing in that it gives one a look at tenor saxophonist John Coltrane when he still had a hesitant style. This audiophile CD reissue has the same music that is currently available on an Original Jazz Classics set: five jazz standards plus “The Theme.” Unlike Coltrane, who would develop rapidly within the next year, Miles was already very much in his prime, sounding quite lyrical on “Just Squeeze Me” and “There Is No Greater Love,” and the classic rhythm section (pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones) was quickly starting to gel.

Tracks:
01 – Just Squeeze Me
02 – There is No Greater Love
03 – How am I to Know?
04 – S’posin
05 – The Theme
06 – Stablemates

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet
John Coltrane – tenor sax
Red Garland – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Philly Joe Jones – drums

Recorded in Hackensack, NJ on November 16, 1955.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Miles Davis – Cookin’ with the Miles Davis Quintet {Fantasy}[xrcd]


Review by Lindsay Planer (allmusic.com)
Cookin’ is the first of four albums derived from the Miles Davis quintet’s fabled extended recording session on October 26, 1956; the concept being that the band would document their vast, live-performance catalog in a studio environment, rather than preparing all new tracks for their upcoming long-player. The bounty of material in the band’s live sets — as well as the overwhelming conviction in the quintet’s studio sides — would produce the lion’s share of the Cookin’, Relaxin’, Workin’, and Steamin’ albums. As these recordings demonstrate, there is an undeniable telepathic cohesion that allows this band — consisting of Miles Davis (trumpet), John Coltrane (tenor sax), Red Garland (piano), and Philly Joe Jones (drums) — to work so efficiently both on the stage as well as in the studio. This same unifying force is also undoubtedly responsible for the extrasensory dimensions scattered throughout these recordings. The immediate yet somewhat understated ability of each musician to react with the ingenuity and precision is expressed in the consistency and singularity of each solo as it is maintained from one musician to the next without the slightest deviation. “Blues by Five” reveals the exceptional symmetry between Davis and Coltrane that allows them to complete each other’s thoughts musically. Cookin’ features the pairing of “Tune Up/When Lights Are Low” which is, without a doubt, a highlight not only of this mammoth session, but also the entire tenure of Miles Davis mid-’50s quintet. All the elements converge upon this fundamentally swinging medley. Davis’ pure-toned solos, and the conversational banter that occurs with Coltrane, and later Garland during “When the Lights Are Low,” resounds as some of the finest moments between these musicians.

Tracklist:
01 – My Funny Valentine 06:04
02 – Blues By Five (false start) 00:25
03 – Blues By Five 10:00
04 – Airegin 04:27
05 – Tune Up – When Lights are Low 13:11

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet
John Coltrane – tenor sax (except #1)
Red Garland – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Philly Joe Jones – drums

Recorded at Van Gelder Studios, Hackensack, New Jersey; October 26, 1956

Label: Fantasy – xrcd Edition
Year: 1998
Genre: Jazz
Style: Cool, Hard Bop, Trumpet
Total Time: 34:07

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork