John Pizzarelli – My Blue Heaven {Chesky} “digital dL_2_cd”


Review by Scott Yanow ~allmusic.com
Just prior to signing with RCA/Novus, John Pizzarelli recorded two sets for Chesky that featured him playing in the swing style that he would soon make quite popular. Although joined by all-stars (pianist Dave McKenna, bassist Milt Hinton, drummer Connie Kay, his father, guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli, and flugelhornist Clark Terry) rather than his regular trio, Pizzarelli’s likable vocals and relaxed guitar solos are not overshadowed. In fact, this is a delightful date, with memorable renditions of such songs as “I’m An Errand Boy for Rhythm,” “Lady Be Good,” “The Best Man,” “Gee Baby Ain’t I Good to You” and “Candy.” Easily recommended to John Pizzarelli fans.

Tracklist:
01. My Blue Heaven (4:02)
02. I’m an Errand Boy for Rhythm (3:49)
03. It Could Happen to You (3:25)
04. Lady Be Good (8:05)
05. The Touch of Your Lips (2:35)
06. Can’t Take You Nowhere (4:08)
07. Take My Smile (2:54)
08. That’s What (3:04)
09. Stray Horn (2:44)
10. Best Man (2:48)
11. Oh Me, Oh My, Oh Gosh (3:27)
12. Don’t Get Around Much Anymore (3:13)
13. Gee Baby Ain’t I Good to You (3:19)
14. Passion Flower (4:14)
15. Zoot Walked In / Morning Fun (4:28)
16. Candy (3:38)

Personnel:
John Pizzarelli – guitar & vocals
Dave McKenna – piano
Bucky Pizzarelli – guitar
Clark Terry – trumpet
Milt Hinton – bass
Connie Kay – drums

Recorded at RCA Studio A, New York City; on February 6 & 7, 1990

Genre: Jazz
Style: Swing, Standards
Label: Chesky / hdtracks.com
Year: 1990
Time: 59:51

* Original source was a digital download in 24bit-96kHz; and this share is a self-made imitation CD (converted to redbook standard, 16bit-44.1kHz); which can easily be burned as an “Audio-CD” to an empty media.

Ray Brown Trio featuring Gene Harris – Soular Energy {Concord} ”dvd audio-2-cd”


Review by Scott Yanow ~allmusic.com
This album is important as an early milestone in pianist Gene Harris’ second career. Harris, who had led the popular Three Sounds in the 1960s, had been living in obscurity in Boise, ID, for several years before he was urged by bassist Ray Brown to come to the West Coast for some recording sessions. Harris became a permanent member of Brown’s regular trio for quite a few years before launching his own quartet. He had lost none of his technique, soul, or swing in the interim, as he shows throughout this fine release. Seven of the eight numbers (highlighted by “Exactly Like You,” “Teach Me Tonight,” and “Sweet Georgia Brown”) feature Brown, Harris, and drummer Gerryck King playing soulful bop, while “Mistreated But Undefeated Blues” adds guitarist Emily Remler and the tenor of Red Holloway. An excellent effort.

Tracklist:
01. Exactly Like You (5:47)
02. Cry Me a River (5:47)
03. Teach Me Tonight (4:51)
04. Take the “A” Train (6:22)
05. Mistreated But Undefeated Blues (4:17)
06. That’s All (5:47)
07. Easy Does It (4:03)
08. Sweet Georgia Brown (8:46)

Personnel:
Ray Brown – bass
Gene Harris – piano
Gerryck King – drums
Red Holloway – tenor saxophone
Emily Remler – guitar

Recorded at Coast Recorders, San Francisco, California in August 1984.

Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Bop, Standards
Label: Concord Jazz
Year: 1985
Time: 45:39

* Original source was a DVD audio rip in 24bit-192kHz; and this share is a self-made imitation CD (converted to redbook standard, 16bit-44.1kHz); which can easily be burned as an “Audio-CD” to an empty media.

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + scans from “CD” version (cover+tray+disk)
Quality-2: mp3@320 + scans from “CD” version (cover+tray+disk)

Chet Baker Quartet – When Sunny Gets Blue {SteepleChase}


Review by David Schiff ~amazon.com
This is Chet Baker near the end of his career, when his performances were often erratic. But here his horn sounds great. His voice, however, is that of a broken man, but in an odd way that adds to the beauty of the recording.

Tracklist:
01. Long Ago and Far Away (6:09)
02. Here’s That Rainy Day (7:06)
03. Two in the Dew (8:21)
04. I Should Care (Previously unissued) (8:39)
05. Out of Nowhere (Previously unissued) (5:22)
06. When Sunny Gets Blue (9:08)
07. Isn’t it Romantic (5:19)
08. You’d Be So Nice to Come Home To (7:18)

Personnel:
Chet Baker – trumpet & vocals
Butch Lacy – piano
Jesper Lundgaard – bass
Jukkis Uotila – drums

Recorded at Sound Track Studios, Copenhagen; on February 23, 1986.

Genre: Jazz
Style: Cool, West Coast
Label: SteepleChase
Year: 1988
Time: 57:22

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + scans (cover + tray + CD)
Quality-2: mp3@256 + scans (cover + tray + CD)

George Shearing & Ernestine Anderson – A Perfect Match {Concord}___vinyl-2-cd


Review by Scott Yanow
Pianist George Shearing and singer Ernestine Anderson (who had teamed up briefly at the 1987 Fujitsu-Concord Jazz Festival) collaborated on this full-length Concord release. With strong assistance from bassist Neil Swainson and drummer Jeff Hamilton, Shearing and Anderson mostly stick to standards and their versions uplift the veteran songs. “Body and Soul” is taken as a vocal-piano duet, while “The Best Thing for You” is given an instrumental treatment. Other highlights include Anderson’s vocals on “I’ll Take Romance,” a heartfelt “I Remember Clifford,” “On the Sunny Side of the Street” and “Some Other Time.” Perfect Match is an excellent outing for all concerned.

Tracklist:
01. Trust in Me (3:52)
02. I’ll Take Romance (2:40)
03. Body and Soul (4:46)
04. The Best Thing for You (3:33)
05. I Remember Clifford (4:54)
06. On the Sunny Side of the Street (3:13)
07. The Second Time Around (3:01)
08. Falling in Love with Love (4:29)
09. That’s for Me (3:52)
10. I Won’t Dance (5:29)
11. Some Other Time (2:25)
12. The Touch of Your Lips (3:30)

Personnel:
George Shearing – piano
Ernestine Anderson – vocals
Neil Swainson – bass
Jeff Hamilton – drums

Recorded at Coast Recorders, San Francisco, CA; May 1988

Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Bop, Vocal Jazz
Label: Concord
Year: 1988
Time: 45:46

* Original source was a vinyl-rip in 24bit-96kHz; and this share is a self-made
imitation CD (converted to redbook standard, 16bit-44.1kHz); which can easily
be burned as an “Audio-CD” to an empty media.

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + full LP scans
Quality-2: mp3@320 + full LP scans

Wynton Marsalis – Standard Time Vol.2 “Intimacy Calling” {Columbia}


Review by Scott Yanow ~allmusic.com
Wynton Marsalis’s second of three standard albums was actually released after the third volume. On most of the selections, the brilliant trumpeter is heard in excellent form with his quartet (comprised of pianist Marcus Roberts, bassist Reginald Veal or Robert Hurst and either Herlin Riley or Jeff Watts on drums); tenorman Todd Williams helps out on “I’ll Remember April” and altoist Wes Anderson is also added to “Crepuscule with Nellie.” Marsalis’s tone really makes the ballads worth hearing, and his unusual choice and placement of notes keeps the music stimulating. This mostly bop-oriented set is rounded off by a jaunty version of “Bourbon Street Parade.”

Tracklist:
01. When it’s Sleepytime Down South (5:11)
02. You Don’t Know What Love Is (6:24)
03. Indelible and Nocturnal (4:11)
04. I’ll Remember April (8:34)
05. Embraceable You (7:16)
06. Crepuscule With Nellie (3:04)
07. What is This Thing Called Love? (6:30)
08. The End of a Love Affair (3:13)
09. East of the Sun (West of the Moon) (5:16)
10. Lover (5:06)
11. Yesterdays (9:36)
12. Bourbon Street Parade (5:47)

Personnel:
Wynton Marsalis – trumpet
Todd Williams – tenor saxophone
Wes Anderson – alto saxophone
Marcus Roberts – piano
Robert Hurst, Reginald Veal – bass
Jeff “Tain” Watts, Herlin Riley – drums

Recorded digitally at BMG Studio A, in New York City;
between September 1987 and August 1990.

Genre: Jazz
Style: Neo Bop, Standards
Label: Columbia
Year: 1991
Time: 70:08

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + full scans
Quality-2: mp3@256 + full scans

Stan Getz – Bossas and Ballads: The Lost Sessions {Verve}


Review by Thom Jurek ~allmusic.com
First off, these “Lost Sessions” were never actually lost. The music here was supposed to be released as the Stan Getz Quartet’s first issue on A&M, and for the usual record company reasons, it was shelved instead. The tapes were in the vault and catalogs, so it’s not like they were found in someone’s closet. The bottom line is that Getz, already ill at this point, still had the goods. Produced by Herb Alpert (a genius in his own right even if his records don’t always hold up), the bossas here are tough, innovative jazz tunes mainly written by Getz’s pianist, Kenny Barron. Don’t look for the gentle side of Getz that was so beautifully displayed on his early bossa records with Charlie Byrd and Antonio Carlos Jobim. Instead, this is the man who had reinvented his playing technique. With a strong foil in Barron, Getz was free to explore his form of melodic improvisation to a fuller and wider extent, which is evident if you simply check out his solos on Barron’s “Sunshower” and “El Sueno,” and Mal Waldron’s classic ballad “Soul Eyes.” Interestingly, this was Barron’s date as much as it was Getz’s. His compositions and musical direction are key here, and he was trying to get deeper into and stretch the samba groove in his writing. Finding Getz in such an adventurous space in his playing allowed for this. With a rhythm section that includes bassist George Mraz and drummer Victor Lewis, this disc is essential not only for fans of Getz and Barron, but for real jazzheads.

Tracklist:
01. Sunshower (7:21)
02. Yours and Mine (8:01)
03. Joanne Julia (7:51)
04. Soul Eyes (7:24)
05. Spiral (7:55)
06. Beatrice (8:15)
07. The Wind (8:57)
08. El Sueno (6:37)
09. Feijoada (6:24)

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor saxophone
Kenny Barron – piano
George Mraz – bass
Victor Lewis – drums

Recorded & mixed by Al Schmitt
Mastered by Doug sax and Robert Hadley
Produced by Herb Alpert

Recorded March 1989 at A&M Recording Studios, Hollywood: track 6 on March 26;
tracks 1, 3-5 and 7 on March 28; tracks 2,8 and 9 on March 29

Genre: Jazz
Style: Hard Bop, Latin Jazz, Bossa Nova
Label: Verve
Year: 2003
Time: 68:44

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + artwork (full, except “tray”)
Quality-2: mp3@320 + artwork (full, except “tray”)

Ella Fitzgerald – Ella for Lovers {Verve} “Russian Print”


Review by Tim Sendra ~allmusic.com
This 16-track collection features Ella Fitzgerald in a variety of musical settings singing romantic songs of love. The disc covers the years 1950 to 1961 with songs taken from the Verve and Decca archives. Four songs are culled from Intimate Ella, which has pianist Paul Smith as her sole accompanist. For the six songs from Pure Ella, she is backed by the wonderful pianist Ellis Larkins. A lovely take from this session on the Gershwin brothers “I’ve Got a Crush on You” is a highlight of the compilation. Two tracks are lifted from the gently swinging Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie! with backing by a small combo. Three songs are extracted from Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Rodgers and Hart Songbook; two with small-combo backing including Paul Smith on piano, one, the haunting “Wait Till You See Her,” with Barney Kessel providing guitar. The disc closes out with a song taken from Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Irving Berlin Song Book. “Russian Lullaby” is a spare track with Fitzgerald’s majestic vocals supported by viola and harp. Fitzgerald sounds marvelous throughout, she could sing your phone bill and make it sound like a heavenly choir, and the song selection is top notch. There are a lot of Ella Fitzgerald collections available, this is a solid if not essential addition to them and also a nice disc for a romantic evening.

Tracklist:
01. I Got a Guy (3:46)
02. I Hadn’t Anyone Till You (2:51)
03. Please Be Kind (3:36)
04. How Long has This Been Going On? (3:16)
05. With a Song in My Heart (2:47)
06. Baby, What Else can I Do? (3:50)
07. I’ve Got a Crush on You (3:16)
08. My Melancholy Baby (2:59)
09. Wait Till You See Her (1:32)
10. You’re My Thrill (3:39)
11. Misty (2:55)
12. What is There to Say? (3:23)
13. Bewitched (7:05)
14. I’m Getting Sentimental Over You (2:38)
15. Imagination (2:37)
16. Russian Lullaby (1:52)

Personnel:
Ella Fitzgerald – vocals
Herb Ellis, Barney Kessel – guitar
Ellis Larkins, Lou Levy, Paul Smith – piano
Gus Johnson , Stan Levey, Alvin Stoller – drums
Wilfred Middlebrooks, Joe Mondragon – bass

Recorded at: Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA; New York, NY;
Nola Recording Studio, New York, NY; Radio Recorders, Hollywood, CA;
United Recorders, Hollywood, CA.; between 1950 – 1961.
Compilation producer: Bryan Koniarz.

Genre: Jazz
Style: Vocal Jazz, Standards
Label: Verve (Russian Print)
Year: 2003
Time: 52:01

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + full scans
Quality-2: mp3@320 + full scans

Bill Evans – The Tokyo Concert {Fantasy}[OJC]


Review by Ken Dryden ~allmusic.com
The Bill Evans Trio’s 1973 concert in Tokyo was his first recording for Fantasy and it produced yet another Grammy nomination for the presentation. With bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Marty Morell, this straight reissue of the original LP mixes offbeat songs with overlooked gems, familiar standards, and surprisingly, only one Evans composition, the demanding “T.T.T.T. (Twelve Tone Tune Two).” Bobbie Gentry’s “Mornin’ Glory” was an unusual choice to open the performance and seems a bit conservative for Evans. The adrenaline picks up considerably with his mid-tempo waltzing take of Jerome Kern’s “Up With the Lark” and a driving “My Romance.” Evans also revisits the twisting Scott LaFaro tune “Gloria’s Step,” which showcases both Gomez and Morell. The closer, “On Green Dolphin Street,” is given a slight bossa nova flavor and isn’t nearly as aggressive as most of the pianist’s live recordings of this popular standard. Although this CD doesn’t rank among the Top Five live dates recorded by Bill Evans, it should be considered an essential part of his discography. It seems odd that no additional music turned up for this reissue, as the concert is just under an hour long; all nine tracks are included in the boxed set The Complete Fantasy Recordings.

Tracklist:
01. Mornin’ Glory (5:48)
02. Up with the Lark (6:48)
03. Yesterday I Heard the Rain (6:33)
04. My Romance (8:43)
05. When Autumn Comes (6:05)
06. T.T.T.T. (Twelve Tone Tune Two) (6:38)
07. Hullo Bolinas (4:01)
08. Gloria’s Step (7:57)
09. On Green Dolphin Street (6:47)

Personnel:
Bill Evans – piano
Eddie Gomez – bass
Marty Morell – drums

Recorded in performance at Yubin Chokin Hall, Tokyo, Japan; January 20, 1973.
Digital mastering, 1990 – Phil De Lancie; Fantasy Studios, Berkeley.
Produced by Helen Keane.

Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Post-Bop
Label: Fantasy / OJC
Year: 1990
Time: 59:19

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + full scans
Quality-2: mp3@320 + full scans

McCoy Tyner Trio – Inception {impulse!} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Alexander Gelfand ~allmusic.com
Those familiar with the dense, percussive style that pianist McCoy Tyner has cultivated since the 1970s onwards may be surprised by what they hear on Inception. Like Reaching Fourth and Nights of Ballads and Blues, this album gives listeners the chance to hear what a very young Tyner sounded like outside the confines of the classic John Coltrane quartet of the early ’60s; it reveals a lyrical approach to jazz piano that seems a far cry from Tyner’s mature style. The choice of material is fairly evenly split between modal pieces like “Inception” and more harmonically involved tunes like “Speak Low,” and the pianist’s treatment of both demonstrates the extent to which his early work was rooted in bebop. Tyner had yet to develop the massive orchestral sound and highly distinctive vocabulary of modal licks that would mark his later style, and throughout this album he spins dizzyingly long and singing lines with an exquisitely light touch. The irresistible rush of forward momentum that he maintains on tracks like “Effendi” and “Blues for Gwen” is breathtaking, and there is an exuberant, almost athletic quality to much of his solo work. Bassist Art Davis and drummer Elvin Jones provide superb accompaniment throughout, and they lay a solid rhythmic foundation for Tyner’s sparkling melodic flights. The pianist’s penchant for drama, which asserts itself more strongly in his later work, is on brief display in the original ballad “Sunset”; his skills as an arranger, though evident on several tracks, are perhaps best illustrated by the intricate contrapuntal treatment of “There Is No Greater Love.”

Tracklist:
01. Inception (4:28)
02. There is No Greater Love (6:20)
03. Blues for Gwen (4:26)
04. Sunset (4:41)
05. Effendi (6:39)
06. Speak Low (6:22)

Personnel:
McCoy Tyner – piano
Art Davis – bass
Elvin Jones – drums

Recorded January 10, 1962

Genre: Jazz
Style: Post Bop, Piano Trio
Label: impulse! / Analogue Productions
Year: 2011
Time: 32:56

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log) + full scans
Quality-2: mp3@320 + full scans

Cal Tjader’s Modern Mambo Quintet – Mambo with Tjader {Fantasy}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow ~allmusic.com
Vibraphonist Cal Tjader was quickly becoming one of the most important forces in Latin jazz when he recorded the infectious music on this CD reissue. Joined by pianist Manuel Duran, bassist Carlos Duran, and a couple of percussionists, Tjader performs Latinized versions of such standards as “Cherry,” “This Can’t Be Love,” “I’ll Remember April,” “Autumn Leaves,” and even “Sonny Boy.” Decades later, this highly rhythmic music (which helped lay the groundwork for Latin jazz in general) still sounds fresh and lively.

Tracklist:
01. Mamblues (mambo) 2:28
02. Midnight Sun (cha cha cha) 3:58
03. Sonny Boy (mambo) 2:37
04. Cherry (cha cha cha) 3:25
05. I’ll Remember April (bolero) 3:22
06. This Can’t Be Love (mambo) 3:05
07. Tenderly (bolero) 3:49
08. Dearly Beloved (cha cha cha) 3:58
09. Chloe (mambo) 2:32
10. Lucero (mambo) 3:17
11. Bye Bye Blues (mambo) 2:59
12. Autumn Leaves (bolero) 2:49

Personnel:
Cal Tjader – vibes
Manuel Duran – piano
Carlos Duran – bass
Bayardo Velarde – timbales, bongos
Edgard Rosales – congas

Recorded Fall 1954.

Genre: Jazz
Style: Latin Jazz
Label: Fantasy / OJC
Year: 1992
Time: 38:19

Quality-1: flac (tracks, eac, cue, log), full artwork
Quality-2: mp3@320, full artwork

{updated-post}

Count Basie – Basie Jam {Pablo} “Analogue Productions”


Review from ~cduniverse.com
This 1973 recording, the first of two Count Basie albums for the Fantasy label highlighting impromptu jam sessions, is something of a musical party. Heard here with longtime pals Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Harry “Sweets” Edison, and others, the Count performs a set of bluesy originals. Basie and company alight in a variety of musical dialogs-joyous and heartrending, playful and stalwart. As one might expect, each player rises to the occasion. And then some. There can be little doubt that Basie’s marvelous sensitivity as an accompanist catalyzes the fine soloing on this album. “One-Nighter” hints at least twice at how invigorating it can be to play with Basie. The first instance occurs when tenor-man Zoot Sims takes over from the organ, exacting a phrase of perfect, rounded beauty. A second occurs when Edison spreads a single recurring melodic figure across a full chorus, while Basie’s organ wheezes unobtrusively in the background. A soulful and foot-stomping album, “Basie Jam” accurately represents the late swing icon in his mature years.

Tracklist:
01. Doubling Blues (07:01)
02. Hanging Out (09:34)
03. Red Bank Blues (09:05)
04. One-Nighter (11:45)
05. Freeport Blues (11:44)

Personnel:
Count Basie – piano, organ
Irving Ashby – guitar
J.J. Johnson – trombone
Harry “Sweets” Edison – trumpet
Eddie Davis, Zoot Sims – tenor sax
Ray Brown – bass
Louie Bellson – drums

Recorded December 10, 1973

Label: Pablo – “Analogue Productions” Edition
Year: 1995
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Blues
Total Time: 49:09

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, scans (cover+inside+tray+CD)

Oscar Peterson + Harry “Sweets” Edison + Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson {Pablo}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)
During Nov. 12-14, 1986, pianist Oscar Peterson recorded three albums worth of material for Norman Granz’s Pablo label. This particular CD features the great pianist with his quartet (bassist Dave Young, drummer Martin Drew and guest guitarist Joe Pass) along with trumpeter Harry “Sweets” Edison and altoist Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson. The strictly instrumental set has many fine solos on appealing tunes such as “Stuffy,” “Broadway” and the lengthy blues “Slooow Drag.” This boppish session gave Vinson a rare chance to really stretch out and he was up for the challenge.

Tracklist:
01. Stuffy (09:14)
02. This One’s for Jaws (04:54)
03. Everything Happens to Me (04:37)
04. Broadway (05:14)
05. Slooow Drag (10:36)
06. What’s New (04:28)
07. Satin Doll (07:29)

Personnel:
Oscar Peterson – piano
Harry “Sweets” Edison – trumpet
Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson – alto saxophone
Joe Pass – guitar
Dave Young – bass
Martin Drew – drums

Recorded in Hollywood, CA; November 12, 1986.

Label: Pablo
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Bop
Total Time: 46:31

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Coleman Hawkins – Good Old Broadway {Fantasy}[xrcd]


Editorial review from “amazon.com”
Coleman Hawkins is frequently identified as the “father” of jazz tenor saxophone playing. With a perfect rhythm section featuring his working band – Tommy Flanagan on piano, Manor Holley, Jr. on bass, and Eddie Locke on drums, Hawkins showcases his illuminating artistry on this collection of love songs from Broadway shows. This “classic” Hawkins album has never before been available on CD.

Tracklist:
01. I Talk to the Trees (04:24)
02. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (04:40)
03. Wanting You (02:27)
04. Strange Music (06:18)
05. The Man that Got Away (04:08)
06. Get Out of Town (04:14)
07. Here I’ll Stay (04:09)
08. A Fellow Needs a Girl (04:47)

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins – tenor saxophone
Tommy Flanagan – piano
Major Holly Jr. – bass
Eddie Locke – drums

Recorded January 2nd, 1962 in Englewood Cliffs, N.J.

Label: Fantasy – JVC(xrcd) Edition
Year: 2000
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Bop
Total Time: 35:06

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Jimmy Smith – Fourmost Return {Milestone}


Review by Ken Dryden (allmusic.com)
Recorded during the same 1990 gig at Fat Tuesday’s as the earlier Fourmost CD, Fourmost Return features Jimmy Smith, Stanley Turrentine, Kenny Burrell, and Grady Tate in great form once again, so this is no compilation of lukewarm leftovers. The music includes a burning, up-tempo take of “Sonnymoon for Two” and a bluesy and lyrical interpretation of “Mood Indigo,” as well as an initially lounge-like “Laura” that gives way to a hot solo by Burrell. Smith also revives his popular “Back at the Chicken Shack” and adds a good-natured but rather hoarse vocal to the oldie “Ain’t She Sweet.” All the players are in top form and this release should appeal to fans of soul-jazz.

Tracklist:
01. Sonnymoon for Two (05:37)
02. Mood Indigo (06:15)
03. Ain’t She Sweet (03:32)
04. Back at the Chicken Shack (06:36)
05. Organ Grinder’s Swing (05:06)
06. Laura (10:49)
07. Blues for Stanley (10:25)

Personnel:
Jimmy Smith – organ, vocal on #3
Stanley Turrentine – tenor saxophone
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Grady Tate – drums

Recorded live at Fat Tuesday’s, New York City; November 16-17, 1990.

Label: Milestone
Year: 2001
Genre: Jazz
Style: Soul Jazz, Hard Bop
Total Time: 48:19

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Jimmy Smith – Fourmost {Milestone}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)
Organist Jimmy Smith has a reunion on this CD with his 30 plus-year associates tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine and guitarist Kenny Burrell along with drummer Grady Tate. Together they play spirited and creative versions of standards and blues. The highpoints include “Midnight Special,” a swinging “Main Stem,” Tate’s warm vocal on “My Funny Valentine” and a lengthy rendition of “Quiet Nights.” Suffice it to say that this all-star date reaches its potential and is easily recommended to fans of straightahead jazz.

Tracklist:
01. Midnight Special (06:58)
02. Main Stem (06:42)
03. Summertime (08:28)
04. Things Ain’t What They Used to Be (06:37)
05. Soulful Brothers (10:18)
06. My Funny Valentine (05:53)
07. Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars (10:50)

Personnel:
Jimmy Smith – organ
Stanley Turrentine – tenor sax
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Grady Tate – drums, vocal on “My Funny Valentine”

Recorded live at Fat Tuesday’s, New York City; November 16-17, 1990.

Label: Milestone
Year: 1987
Genre: Jazz
Style: Hard Bop, Soul Jazz
Total Time: 55:46

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Louis Armstrong – Master of Jazz·Live in Chicago, 1962 {Storyville}[MFSL]


Review by Steven McDonald (allmusic.com)
A wonderful artifact, this is a prime slice of the latter-day Satchmo with a small all-stars band working through a relatively typical set. The performance ranges from solid to excellent, with the occasional odd flub (such as the uncertain return after Danny Barcelona’s first drum solo on “Basin Street Blues”), but the quality of the recording is the key element. The Mobile Fidelity gold CD edition adds three tracks to the Storyville original, and provides a clear, uncluttered sound field with excellent separation. The resulting album is a treat to hear.

Tracklist:
01. When it’s Sleepy Time Down South (02:44)
02. Indiana (04:21)
03. Give Me a Kiss to Build a Dream On (05:37)
04. The Bucket’s Got a Hole in It (03:32)
05. Tiger Rag (01:17)
06. Mack the Knife (03:17)
07. Blueberry Hill (03:18)
08. When the Saints (03:50)
09. Ole Miss (04:03)
10. When I Grow Too Old to Dream (04:17)
11. Basin Street Blues (07:08)
12. High Society Calypso (05:01)
13. C’est Si Bon (03:28)
14. La Vie En Rose (04:59)
15. The Faithful Hussar (05:25)
16. Once in a While (02:02)
17. When it’s Sleepy Time Down South [instrumental] (02:04)

Personnel:
Louis Armstrong – trumpet, vocals
Trummy Young – trombone
Joe Darensbourg – clarinet
Billy Kyle – piano
Billy Cronk – bass
Danny Barcelona – drums

Recorded August 1, 1962; Chicago

Label: Storyville – MFSL Edition
Year: 1997
Genre: Jazz
Style: Vocal Jazz, Dixieland, New Orleans
Total Time: 66:22

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Phineas Newborn, Jr. – Harlem Blues {Fantasy}[xrcd]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)
The superb trio (pianist Phineas Newborn, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Elvin Jones) had never played together before but it didn’t matter. They had little trouble finding common ground. The virtuosic pianist (still in peak form) leads the way on such pieces as his “Harlem Blues,” “Ray’s Idea” (composed decades earlier by Brown) and Horace Silver’s “Cookin’ at the Continental.”

Tracklist:
01. Harlem Blues (04:12)
02. Sweet and Lovely (07:38)
03. Little Girl Blue (06:15)
04. Ray’s Idea (05:21)
05. Stella By Starlight (06:00)
06. Tenderly (05:56)
07. Cookin’ at the Continental (03:08)

Personnel:
Phineas Newborn, Jr. – piano
Ray Brown – bass
Elvin Jones – drums

Recorded at Contemporary’s Studio, Los Angeles; February 12 and 13, 1969

Label: Fantasy – xrcd Edition
Year: 1999
Genre: Jazz
Style: Mainstream, Hard Bop, Piano Trio
Total Time: 38:29

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork(cover+tray+inside+CD)

{re-up}

Astrud Gilberto – Compact Jazz {Verve}


Review by Stephen Cook (allmusic.com)
For listeners new to Gilberto’s classic Verve work, this edition of the label’s Compact Jazz sampler series makes for a perfect introduction. Along with Verve’s equally fine Silver Collection of Gilberto’s prime sides, this 16-track set includes cuts from most of the singer’s different projects. From her classic Getz date (“The Girl From Ipanema”) to her solo sessions with both Gil Evans (“Berimbau”) and Ron Carter and Toots Thielemans (“Beach Samba”), the music is always top-notch. A disc that will please both your bossa nova- and jazz-loving friends at that next Carnaval party.

Tracklist:
01. The Girl from Ipanema (05:15)
02. Agua de Beber (02:21)
03. Once I Loved (02:14)
04. Goodbye Sadness (Tristeza) (03:26)
05. Meditation (02:42)
06. Berimbau (02:26)
07. It Might As Well Be Spring (04:24)
08. O Morro (Nao Tem Vez) (02:59)
09. Summer Samba (So Nice) (02:39)
10. Corcovado (Quiet Nights) (04:15)
11. Dindi (02:44)
12. Take Me to Aruanda (02:29)
13. Felicidade (02:47)
14. Only Trust Your Heart (04:26)
15. Beach Samba (02:49)
16. How Insensitive (02:48)

Personnel:
Astrud Gilberto – vocals
featuring:
Stan Getz, Joao Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Gil Evans and Walter Wanderley

Compilation produced 1987

Label: Verve
Year: 1990
Genre: Jazz
Style: Vocal Jazz, Bossa Nova
Total Time: 50:43

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Kenny Dorham – Quiet Kenny {Fantasy}[xrcd]


Review by Michael G. Nastos (allmusic.com)
In the liner notes of Quiet Kenny, former Downbeat magazine publisher Jack Maher states that trumpeter Kenny Dorham’s music is not necessarily the demure, balladic, rapturous jazz one might associate as romantic or tranquil. Cool and understated might be better watchwords for what the ultra-melodic Dorham achieves on this undeniably well crafted set of standards and originals that is close to containing his best work overall during a far too brief career. Surrounded by an excellent rhythm team of the equally sensitive pianist Tommy Flanagan, emerging bassist Paul Chambers, and the always-beneficial drummer Art Taylor, Dorham and his mates are not prone to missteps or overt exaggerations. One of Dorham’s all-time best tunes “Lotus Blossom” kicks off the set with its bop to Latin hummable melody, fluid dynamics, and Dorham’s immaculate, unpretentious tone. “Old Folks,” a classic ballad, is done mid-tempo, while the true “quiet” factor comes into play on interesting version of “My Ideal” where Dorham gingerly squeezes out the slippery wet notes, and on the sad ballad “Alone Together.” The rest of the material is done in easygoing, unforced fashion, especially the originals “Blue Friday” and the simple swinger “Blue Spring Shuffle” which is not really a shuffle. Never known as a boisterous or brash player, but also not a troubadour of romanticism — until he started singing — Dorham’s music is also far from complacent, and this recording established him as a Top Five performer in jazz on his instrument. It comes recommended to all.

Tracklist:
01. Lotus Blossom (04:43)
02. My Ideal (05:09)
03. Blue Friday (08:50)
04. Alone Together (03:14)
05. Blue Spring Shuffle (07:40)
06. I Had the Craziest Dream (04:42)
07. Old Folks (05:16)
08. Mack the Knife (03:04)

Personnel:
Kenny Dorham – trumpet
Tommy Flanagan – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Art Taylor – drums

Recorded in Englewood Cliffs, NJ; November 13, 1959.

Label: Fantasy – xrcd Edition
Year: 1992
Genre: Jazz
Style: Classic Jazz, Hard Bop
Total Time: 42:38

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Barney Kessel – Kessel Plays “Carmen” {Contemporary}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow
This is an unusual set that has been reissued on CD. During an era when many Broadway and movie scores were recorded in jazz settings (thanks in part to the success of Shelly Manne’s best-selling My Fair Lady album), guitarist Barney Kessel chose to interpret nine melodies from Bizet’s opera Carmen. The guitarist is heard in three different settings: joined by five woodwinds and a rhythm section; with five jazz horns (including altoist Herb Geller and trumpeter Ray Linn) and a trio; and with vibraphonist Victor Feldman in a quintet. Kessel also wrote the arrangements, which pay tribute to the melodies while not being shy of swinging the themes. An interesting if not essential project.

Tracklist:
01 – Swingin’ the Toreador 05:52
02 – A Pad on the Edge of Town 06:46
03 – If You Dig Me 04:04
04 – Free As a Bird 05:00
05 – Viva El Toro! 03:15
06 – Flowersville 06:00
07 – Carmen’s Cool 04:43
08 – Like, There’s No Place Like… 03:59
09 – The Gypsy’s Hip 03:56

Personnel:
Barney Kessel – guitar
Harry Betts – trombone
Ray Linn – trumpet
Herb Geller – alto sax
Justin Gordon – flute, alto flute, tenor sax
Chuck Gentry – baritone sax
Buddy Collette – flue, alto flute, clarinet
Bill Smith – clarinet, bass clarinet
Jules Jacob – oboe, clarinet
Pete Terry – bass clarinet, bassoon
Andre Previn – piano
Joe Mondragon – bass
Shelly Manne – drums

Recorded in Contemporary Records studio, Los Angeles; December 19 & 22, 1958.

Label: Contemporary / OJC
Year: 1986
Genre: Jazz
Total Time: 43:34

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Jimmy Bruno with special guest Joey DeFrancesco – Like That {Concord}


Review by Alex Henderson (allmusic.com)

Although Like That was recorded in New York, many of the people involved with the project were Philadelphians. The pleasing hard bop date unites Jimmy Bruno’s Philly-based trio of the 1990s (which includes bassist Craig Thomas and drummer Steve Holloway) with organist/trumpeter and Philly native Joey DeFrancesco, while the liner notes were written by guitar great Pat Martino (another Philadelphian). Producer Allen Farnham, however, lived close to New York in northern New Jersey. Bruno’s guitar and DeFrancesco’s organ prove highly compatible on selections ranging from Sam Jones’ “Unit Seven” and Jerome Kern’s “The Way You Look Tonight” to Bruno originals such as the sentimental “Waltz for Nancy,” the angular “Raezer’s Edge,” and the mellifluous “Night Dreamer.” Although DeFrancesco plays organ on most of the 11 songs, he switches to the trumpet and favors a Miles Davis-influenced mute on relaxed versions of “There Is No Greater Love” and “Stars Fell on Alabama.” Bruno’s Concord output has been quite consistent, and this fine CD is no exception.

Tracklist:
01 – E. V.
02 – Raezer’s Edge
03 – Waltz for Nancy
04 – There is No Greater Love
05 – The Iguana’s Uncle
06 – Pat’s House
07 – Night Dreamer
08 – The Way You Look Tonight
09 – Like That
10 – Stars Fell on Alabama
11 – Unit Seven

Personnel:
Jimmy Bruno – guitar
Joey DeFrancesco – organ, trumpet (on #4 and #10)
Steve Holloway – drums (except on #10)
Craig Thomas – acoustic & electric bass (except on #3, 7, 8, 10 & 11)

Recorded at Sound on Sound, New York, NY; August 30-31, 1995.

Label: Concord Jazz
Year: 1996
Genre: Jazz
Style: Hard Bop, Post Bop

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork