Stanley Turrentine – Salt Song {SONY}


Review by Steve Huey (allmusic.com)

Stanley Turrentine’s stint with Creed Taylor’s CTI label may not have produced any out-and-out classics on the level of the very best LPs by Freddie Hubbard, Hubert Laws, or George Benson, but the bluesy tenorist’s output was consistently strong and worthwhile for all but the most stridently anti-fusion listeners. Salt Song was Turrentine’s second album for CTI, and while it’s perhaps just a small cut below his debut Sugar, it’s another fine, eclectic outing that falls squarely into the signature CTI fusion sound: smooth but not slick, accessible but not simplistic. In general, keyboardist Eumir Deodato’s arrangements have plenty of light funk and Brazilian underpinnings, the latter often courtesy of percussionist Airto Moreira. The first three cuts are the most memorable, beginning with a ten-minute exploration of the abrupt time signature shifts of Freddie Hubbard’s “Gibraltar.” Though a hard bop version might have returned to the theme a little less often, Turrentine’s solo sections are full of ideas, befitting one of his favorite pieces of the period; plus, guitarist Eric Gale shines as both a rhythm and lead player. The traditional gospel tune “I Told Jesus” features Turrentine at his bluesiest and earthiest, with snatches of ethereal choir vocals floating up behind him. Milton Nascimento’s title track, naturally, has the strongest Brazilian flavor of the program, and Turrentine skillfully negotiates its frequent shifts in and out of double time. The 1997 CD reissue also includes Nascimento’s “Vera Cruz” as a bonus track. All in all, Salt Song has dated well, partly because the arrangements don’t overemphasize electric piano, but mostly on the strength of Turrentine’s always-soulful playing.

Tracks:
01 – Gibraltar
02 – I Told Jesus
03 – Salt Song
04 – I Haven’t Got Anything Better to Do
05 – Storm
06 – Vera Cruz (bonus)

Personnel:
Stanley Turrentine – tenor saxophone
Ron Carter, Russell George – bass
Billy Cobham, Airto Moreira – drums
Airto Moreira, Joao Palma, Dom Um Romao – percussion
Eumir Deodato, Horace Parlan, Richard Tee – piano/electric piano/organ
Eric Gale, Sivuca – guitar
Hubert Laws, George Marge, Romeo Penque, Jerome Richardson – flute
Julius Brand, Paul Gershman, Julie Held, Leo Kahn, Harry Katzman, Joe Malin – violin
Harold Coletta – viola
Charles McCracken, Alan Shulman – cello
Margaret Branch, Brenda Bryant, Patricia Smith – voices

Arranged and conducted by Eumir Deodato
Tracks 1-5 recorded at Van Gelder Studios, July 7 & 13, 1971
Track 6 recorded at Van Gelder Studios, April 23, 1971

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Cannonball Adderley – Somethin’ Else {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Steven McDonald (allmusic.com)

It isn’t too difficult to understand why MFSL considered this album to be a worthy candidate for an Ultradisc reissue — aside from Cannonball Adderley, you have a lineup that includes Miles Davis, Hank Jones, Sam Jones, and Art Blakey. This is a group that could take on a Barry Manilow number and turn it into a jazz masterpiece. MFSL have done the purchaser a favor, too, by including an additional track that was left off the original album. This sixth track, “”Alison’s Uncle,”” closes out Somethin’ Else on a high note, changing the flow of energy in an interesting way (purists can still finish up on a quieter note, as with the original, by programming “”Dancing in the Dark”” as the final track). In many ways it’s a surprise that this track was left off originally — it’s an excellent piece, with Adderley and Davis trading licks and solos while Jones and Blakey keep pace. Blakey also takes some terrific solos. The remastering job is the usual superb MFSL effort, producing clear sound with almost no background noise. Due to the original recording (made in 1958), Davis’ trumpet sometimes seems a little shrill and metallic, but it’s not an overwhelming problem — certainly not when you consider Davis’ style. Altogether, an excellent addition to any jazz collection.

Tracks:
01 – Autumn Leaves
02 – Love for Sale
03 – Somethin’ Else
04 – One for Daddy-O
05 – Dancing in the Dark
06 – Alison’s Uncle (aka Bangoon)

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet
Cannonball Adderley – alto sax
Hank Jones – piano
Sam Jones – bass
Art Blakey – drums

Originally released in 1958 by Blue Note Records as BST-81595.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Horace Silver – Cape Verdean Blues {Blue Note}[xrcd]


Review by Steve Huey (allmusic.com)

After the success of Song for My Father and its hit title cut, Horace Silver was moved to pay further tribute to his dad, not to mention connect with some of his roots. Silver’s father was born in the island nation of Cape Verde (near West Africa) before emigrating to the United States, and that’s the inspiration behind The Cape Verdean Blues. Not all of the tracks are directly influenced by the music of Cape Verde (though some do incorporate Silver’s taste for light exoticism); however, there’s a spirit of adventure that pervades the entire album, a sense of exploration that wouldn’t have been quite the same with Silver’s quintet of old. On average, the tracks are longer than usual, and the lineup — featuring tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson (a holdover from the Song for My Father sessions) and trumpeter Woody Shaw — is one of the most modernist-leaning Silver ever recorded with. They push Silver into more advanced territory than he was normally accustomed to working, with mild dissonances and (especially in Henderson’s case) a rawer edge to the playing. What’s more, bop trombone legend J.J. Johnson appears on half of the six tracks, and Silver sounds excited to finally work with a collaborator he’d been pursuing for some time. Johnson ably handles some of the album’s most challenging material, like the moody, swelling “Bonita” and the complex, up-tempo rhythms of “Nutville.” Most interesting, though, is the lilting title track, which conjures the flavor of the islands with a blend of Latin-tinged rhythms and calypso melodies that nonetheless don’t sound quite Caribbean in origin. Also noteworthy are “The African Queen,” with its blend of emotional power and drifting hints of freedom, and “Pretty Eyes,” Silver’s first original waltz. Yet another worthwhile Silver album.

Tracks:
01 – The Cape Verdean Blues
02 – The African Queen
03 – Pretty Eyes
04 – Nutville
05 – Bonita
06 – Mo’ Joe

Personnel:
Woody Shaw – trumpet
J. J. Johnson – trombone
Joe Henderson – tenor sax
Horace Silver – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Roger Humphries – drums

Recorded 1 & 25, 1965, at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Joe Pass – Portraits of Duke Ellington {Pablo} “Japan”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Recorded just a month after Duke Ellington’s death, this tribute album (reissued on CD) features guitarist Joe Pass (just beginning to become famous), bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Bobby Durham jamming on eight Ellington tunes and “Caravan” (which was penned by one of Duke’s key sidemen, Juan Tizol). The interplay between the three musicians is quite impressive, and Pass’ mastery of the guitar is obvious (he didn’t really need the other sidemen). Highlights include “In a Mellow Tone,” “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore,” and “I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good).” Recommended.

Tracks:
01 – Satin Doll
02 – I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart
03 – Sophisticated Lady
04 – I Got It Bad (and that Ain’t Good)
05 – In a Mellow Tone
06 – Solitude
07 – Don’t Get Around Much Anymore
08 – Do Nothin’ ’till You Hear from Me
09 – Caravan

Personnel:
Joe Pass – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Bobby Durham – drums

Recorded on June 21, 1974

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Donald Byrd & Kenny Burrell – All Night Long {Prestige}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Two of guitarist Kenny Burrell’s best sessions from the 1950s were this release and its companion, All Day Long. Burrell is teamed with an impressive group of young all-stars, including trumpeter Donald Byrd, tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley, Jerome Richardson on flute and tenor, pianist Mal Waldron, bassist Doug Watkins, and drummer Art Taylor. In addition to the lengthy “All Night Long” and three group originals (two by Mobley and one from Waldron), the original LP program has been augmented by a medley of “Body and Soul” and “Tune Up” from the same session. Jam sessions such as this one are only as good as the solos; fortunately, all of the musicians sound quite inspired, making this an easily recommended set.

Tracks:
01 – All Night Long
02 – Boo-Lu
03 – Flickers
04 – Li’l Hankie
05 – Body & Soul
06 – Tune Up

Personnel:
Donald Byrd – trumpet
Hank Mobley – tenor saxophone
Jerome Richardson – flute, tenor saxophone
Kenny Burrell – guitar
Doug Watkins – bass
Art Taylor – drums

Recorded in Hackensack, NJ; December 28, 1956.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Bill Evans Trio – Portrait in Jazz {Riverside}[DCC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

The first of two studio albums by the Bill Evans-Scott LaFaro-Paul Motian trio (both of which preceded their famous engagement at the Village Vanguard), this Portrait in Jazz reissue contains some wondrous interplay, particularly between pianist Evans and bassist LaFaro, on the two versions of “Autumn Leaves.” Other than introducing Evans’ “Peri’s Scope,” the music is comprised of standards, but the influential interpretations were far from routine or predictable at the time. LaFaro and Motian were nearly equal partners with the pianist in the ensembles and their versions of such tunes as “Come Rain or Come Shine,” “When I Fall in Love,” and “Someday My Prince Will Come” (which preceded Miles Davis’ famous recording by a couple years) are full of subtle and surprising creativity. A gem.

Tracks:
01 – Come Rain or Come Shine
02 – Autumn Leaves
03 – Witchcraft
04 – When I Fall in Love
05 – Peri’s Scope
06 – What is this Thing Called Love?
07 – Spring is Here
08 – Someday My Prince will Come
09 – Blue in Green
10 – Autumn Leaves (alternate – monarual LP version)

Personnel:
Bill Evans – piano
Scott LaFaro – bass
Paul Motian – drums

Recorded at Plaza Sound Studios, Rockefeller Center, NY, on December 28, 1959

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Wes Montgomery – Bumpin’ {Verve} “Master Edition”


Review by Shawn M. Haney (allmusic.com)

Taking the listener on a smoother, rather than bumpier, ride down the moonlight highway of jazz is Wes Montgomery, a chief architect of the world’s guitar virtuoso scene. Not only is his brilliant command of the six-string present here, so is the vivid color tones of notes and blue notes played between. Backed up by a hauntingly beautiful and mesmerizing orchestra conducted and arranged by Don Sebesky, the music almost lifts the listener off his feet into a dreamy, water-like landscape. The atmosphere is serene and enchanting, such as a romantic evening for two under starlight, and certainly a romantic eve merits the accompaniment of this record. The sounds are soft, smooth, and silky, and Montgomery addresses full leadership of his graceful melodic style, fronting close to 20 members of a orchestra perhaps best described resonant and sweeping. So too are the sweeping note flows of Montgomery’s guitar, and his surprising fluidness towards the art of comping, a necessary trait of the jazz guitar virtuoso. Even the unforgettable Jim Hall can be tickled and intrigued through a listen of these influential records, as for all amateur and professional guitar musicians. “A Quiet Thing” is perhaps the most somber, peaceful, and smooth piece on the record, demonstrating Montgomery’s love of quiet, and how much the idea of not playing at all brings music to the listeners. The charming sounds of orchestral violas, violins, cellos, and harp are sent ablaze to create a pleasant atmosphere, either for a quick morning get up, get ready for work, or evening dining setting. “Here’s That Rainy Day” is an up-tempo bossa nova tune that resonates with Montgomery’s enticing chordal changes and blissful phrasing, not to mention the blend of harp and strings lays the groundwork for a perfect rainy day inside, with drops pattering at the windows and fires aglow. The recording engineer did a wonderful job with this album. The sound quality is clear and lush, and, overall, this collection of mid-’60s cool jazz is a delight to listen too, once and again.

Tracks:
01 – Bumpin’
02 – Tear it Down
03 – A Quiet Thing
04 – Con Alma
05 – The Shadow of Your Smile
06 – Mi Cosa
07 – Here’s That Rainy Day
08 – Musty
09 – Just Walkin’
10 – My One and Only Love
11 – Just Walkin’ (previously unissued)

Personnel:
Wes Montgomery – guitar, with Arnold Eidus, Lewis Eley, Paul Gershman, Louis Haber,
Julius Held, Harry Lookofsky, Joe Malignaggi, Gene Orloff, Sol Shapiro (violing);
Harold Coletta, David Schwartz (viola); Charles McCracken, George Ricci (cello);
Margaret Ross (harp); Roger Kellaway (piano); Bob Cranshaw (bass); Grady Tate (drums);
Don Sebesky (arranger, conductor)

On tracks 3 and 4; Helcio Milito (drums), replaces Grady Tate.

Recorded 1965 at Van Gelder Recording Studio, ENglewood Cliffs, New Jersey; tracks 7-9 and 11 on
May 16; tracks 2 and 5 on May 18; tracks 3 and 4 on May 19; and tracks 1, 6 and 10 on May 20.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Kenny Burrell – Blue Muse {Concord}


Review by Rex Butters (allaboutjazz.com)

Since the ’50s, Kenny Burrell has contributed crucial titles to some of the most important jazz labels, including Blue Note, Verve, Columbia, and Muse. For his 96th album, Burrell sticks to what’s worked well for him over the past fifty years: some blues, some Ellington, some swing, and several ballads, all played with beautiful tone and exquisite taste. To keep things fresh, Burrell adds some unusual flavors to the stew: acoustic guitar and voice.
At the dawn of his lengthy career, Burrell sang solo on Detroit TV. He also sang on Weaver of Dreams (Columbia 1960) and the recent Lucky So and So (Concord 2001). While George Benson can continue to sleep undisturbed, Burrell generally acquits himself as a straightforward reader of lyrics on four of these tunes.
With drummer Sherman Ferguson and especially bassist Roberto Miranda lighting a fire under the swinging groove of “Mark I,” the set begins with classic Burrell, his effortless technical prowess and often-imitated tone intact. The ballad “My Friend Ray” pays tribute to the late Ray Brown, pianist Gerald Wiggins treating Burrell’s chords, octaves, and solos as another voice to showcase, sensitively dressing each measure to the sweet sounding guitar’s advantage. Miranda deftly dances through the arrangement without adding clutter.
“On the Wings of Spirit,” finds Herman Riley joining the proceedings on flute and Burrell playing a steel string acoustic in a Brazilian mode. “Then I Met You” returns Riley to breathy flute as Burrell sings a self-penned ode to his wife. While it can be argued that the sentiment and the vocal (and the synth string section) were better left at home, Burrell’s solo offers a glimpse of what could have been a more evocative instrumental.
“It’s No Time to be Blue,” a version of Kenny Dorham’s “Blue Bossa” with lyrics, works better. The emphasis remains on Burrell’s acoustic guitar, with the vocals basically stating the theme. “3/4 of the House” recalls Miles’ “All Blues” and happily steers the program away from a sentimental rut. Riley slathers soulful tenor all over the tune, pushing Burrell into familiar blues territory. Monk’s “‘Round Midnight” brings the tempo back down, but features Burrell’s best vocal of the collection, although the tune’s angularity is all ironed out.
Now celebrating his fruitful twenty-five year association with UCLA, his reputation untouchable, his place in jazz history assured (he was, afterall, Duke Ellington’s favorite guitarist), and with over two hundred album appearances in addition to his nearly hundred as leader, Burrell will hardly live or die by Blue Muse. But this self-produced effort seems to argue in favor of an objective sympathetic hand to help steer number ninety-seven.

Tracks:
01 – Mark I
02 – My Friend Ray
03 – On Wings of the Spirit
04 – Then I Met You
05 – It’s No Time to be Blue
06 – Blue in Green
07 – Blue Muse
08 – Solitude
09 – 3/4 of the House
10 – ‘Round Midnight
11 – Habiba
12 – Blue Guitar Blues

Personnel:
Kenny Burrell – acoustic and electric guitars, vocals
Tom Ranier – piano and keyboards
Gerald Wiggins – piano
Herman Riley – saxophone, flute
Roberto Miranda – bass
Sherman Ferguson – drums

Recorded December 2002, Castle Oak Studios, Calabasas, CA

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Teri Thornton – I’ll Be Easy to Find {Verve}


Review by Michael G. Nastos (allmusic.com)

After a nearly 40-year hiatus, Teri Thornton is back to swing and sing her way into your heart. In comparison to her old Riverside recordings, it seems she’s lost nothing vocally, her angelic clarity and soulful vibrato are intact, and her enthusiasm is still spiking depth charts. She’s backed by her own piano on four cuts, and the able Ray Chew on the others, save Norman Simmons for the sole live-in-concert finale (she and Simmons are credited) with bassist Lonnie Plaxico, alto sax and flute master Jerome Richardson, trombonist Dave Bargeron, multi-instrumentalist Howard Johnson, and drummer J.T. Lewis. At her best on ballads, blues, and upbeat swingers, Thornton proves she really can do it all. Her rippling Ella-cum-Sarah chords are unfettered on a rousing live “Salty Mama” with Grady Tate (drums) and Michael Bowie (bass). The funky blues is all right with Thornton on “Feels Good.” A showstopper, “Knee Deep in the Blues,” and the faded in and out bossa “Wishing Well” are from her pen. The most unusual arrangement by producer Suzi Reynolds of “Nature Boy” has no discernible time signature. It’s kinetic but seems to float, Plaxico punctuating but never seeming to ever hit one. Richardson’s great flute work and Bargeron and Johnson’s background horns play inquisitive mind games, quite a challenging listen. She sings the ballads “Somewhere in the Night,” “Where Are You Running?,” and the title cut immaculately — not kitten soft but forcefully pronounced. She’s boppin’ on “It Ain’t Necessarily So” and adapts “The Lord’s Prayer” in a modal vein, Chew’s piano chordally searching for deliverance, and she really shines instrumentally on “I’ll Be Seeing You” in a fashion that rivals Shirley Horn. There is a definitive song, “I Believe in You,” with a great lyric that seems to sum up the influence of a certain someone who has helped Thornton through her battles with cancer and the constant yin-yang of raising a family for these past four decades. Teri Thornton is emphatically back with this complete view of an artist, finally giving us a taste of what we’ve suspected these many years.

Tracks:
01 – Somewhere in the Night
02 – I Believe in You
03 – It Ain’t Necessarily So
04 – The Lord’s Prayer
05 – Knee Deep in the Blues
06 – I’ll Be Easy to Find
07 – Nature Boy
08 – Wishing Well
09 – Where Are You Running?
10 – Feels Good
11 – I’ll Be Seeing You
12 – Salty Mama

Personnel:
Teri Thornton – vocals (all tracks), piano (7, 10, 11)
Howard Johnson – cornet, tuba, contrabass clarinet, baritone sax (1, 3, 5, 7-9)
Dave Bargeron – trombone (1, 7-9)
Jerome Richardson – flute, bass flute, alto sax (1, 4, 7-9)
Ray Chew – piano (1-6, 8, 9)
Norman Simmons – piano (12)
Lonnie Plaxico – bass (1-11)
Michael Bowie – bass (12)
J. T. Lewis – drums (1-11)
Grady Tate – drums (12)

Recorded on June 22 & 24, 1997 at RPM Studios, New York

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Kenny Drew Trio – Recollections {Timeless}


Tracks:
01 – Golden Earrings
02 – Les Parapluies de Cherbourg
03 – The Gentle Rain
04 – Chateau en Suede
05 – In Your Own Sweet Way
06 – Copenhagen Blues
07 – Summer Knows
08 – A Foggy Day
09 – Suddenly it’s Spring
10 – Old Danish
11 – Recollections

Personnel:
Kenny Drew – piano
Niels Henning Orsted Pedersen – bass
Alvin Queen – drums

Recorded May 14, 15, 1989 at Easy Sound Studio, Copenhagen

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Miles Davis – Blue Miles {Columbia}


Review Review from cduniverse.com

With an artist as prolific and constantly evolving as Miles Davis, it would be futile to attempt a single CD compilation of his work without first selecting a theme to narrow things down. For BLUE MILES Columbia/Legacy has chosen a smart if unsurprising category: Miles playing tunes which, while not necessarily following the blues form per se, all evoke a kind of restless, after-hours, melancholy mood.
In drawing material from the years 1956-1967, this collection also provides a de facto cross section of Miles’ ensembles from perhaps the most fertile decade of his incredibly productive career. “Round Midnight” features the ’50s quintet that included Coltrane, Red Garland, Paul Chambers and Philly Joe Jones. “Blues for Pablo” and “The Pan Piper” are collaborations with Gil Evans, and “Blue in Green” comes from the groundbreaking KIND OF BLUE album. “Drad Dog,” with Hank Mobley on tenor and Wynton Kelly on piano, and “Basin St. Blues,” with George Coleman on tenor, are from the early ’60s, while “Circle” and “Sweet Pea” bring things up to the second classic quintet era.

Tracks:
01 – ‘Round Midnight
02 – Blues for Pablo
03 – Blue in Green
04 – The Pan Piper
05 – Drad Dog
06 – Basin Street Blues
07 – Circle
08 – Sweet Pea

Personnel:
Miles Davis – trumpet, with John Coltrane, Philly Joe Jones, Wayne Shorter,
Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams.

Recorded between 1956 to 1967, compilation CD.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Milt Jackson – It Don’t Mean a Thing If You Can’t Tap Your Foot to It {Pablo}[OJC]


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Vibraphonist Milt Jackson’s recording career has been remarkably consistent, and his Pablo recordings of 1975-85 are uniformly excellent. This particular set features his 1984 quartet (a group consisting of pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Mickey Roker) performing four obscure group originals and three standards with swing, subtle creativity and soul. This CD is a good example of Milt Jackson’s enjoyable music.

Tracks:
01 – Midnight Waltz
02 – Ain’t that Nothin’
03 – Stress and Trauma
04 – Used to be Jackson
05 – It Don’t Mean a Thing (If it Ain’t Got that Swing)
06 – If I Were a Bell
07 – Close Enough for Love

Personnel:
Milt Jackson – vibes
Ray Brown – bass
Cedar Walton – piano
Mickey Roker – drums

Recorded at RCA Studios, New York City; July 1984.

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Stan Getz Quartet – The Dolphin {Concord}


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

Stan Getz’s first recording for Concord finds him returning to the strictly acoustic straightahead format, performing six standards with a quartet comprised of pianist Lou Levy, bassist Monty Budwig and drummer Victor Lewis. Getz is in particularly fine form on the title cut, “Joy Spring” and “The Night Has a Thousand Eyes.”

Tracks:
01 – The Dolphin
02 – A Time for Love
03 – Joy Spring
04 – My Old Flame
05 – The Night Has a Thousand Eyes
06 – Close Enough for Love (Theme from “Agatha”)

Personnel:
Stan Getz – tenor saxophone
Lou Levy – piano
Monty Budwig – bass
Victor Lewis – drums

Recorded live at Keystone Corner, San Francisco, California; May 1981

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Duke Ellington meets Coleman Hawkins {impulse!} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Scott Yanow (allmusic.com)

This CD documents a historic occasion. Although Coleman Hawkins had been an admirer of Duke Ellington’s music for at least 35 years at this point and Ellington had suggested they record together at least 20 years prior to their actual meeting in 1962, this was their first (and only) meeting on record. Although it would have been preferable to hear the great tenor performing with the full orchestra, his meeting with Ellington and an all-star group taken out of the big band does feature such greats as Ray Nance (on cornet and violin), trombonist Lawrence Brown, altoist Johnny Hodges, and baritonist Harry Carney. High points include an exuberant “The Jeep Is Jumpin’,” an interesting remake of “Mood Indigo,” and a few new Ellington pieces. This delightful music is recommended in one form or another.

Tracks:
01 – Limbo Jazz
02 – Mood Indigo
03 – Ray Charles’ Place
04 – Wanderlust
05 – You Dirty Dog
06 – Self Portrait (Of the Bean)
07 – The Jeep is Jumpin’
08 – The Ricitic

Personnel:
Duke Ellington – piano
Coleman Hawkins – tenor sax
Ray Nance – cornet & violin
Lawrence Brown – trombone
Johnny Hodges – alto sax
Harry Carney – baritone sax & bass clarinet
Aaron Bell – bass
Sam Woodyard – drums

Originally released on August 18, 1962

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Lee Morgan – The Sidewinder {Blue Note} “Analogue Productions”


Review by Stacia Proefrock (allmusic.com)

Carried by its almost impossibly infectious eponymous opening track, The Sidewinder helped foreshadow the sounds of boogaloo and soul-jazz with its healthy R&B influence and Latin tinge. While the rest of the album retreats to a more conventional hard bop sound, Morgan’s compositions are forward-thinking and universally solid. Only 25 at the time of its release, Morgan was accomplished (and perhaps cocky) enough to speak of mentoring the great Joe Henderson, who at 26 was just beginning to play dates with Blue Note after getting out of the military. Henderson makes a major contribution to the album, especially on “Totem Pole,” where his solos showed off his singular style, threatening to upstage Morgan, who is also fairly impressive here. Barry Harris, Bob Cranshaw, and Billy Higgins are all in good form throughout the album as well, and the group works together seamlessly to create an album that crackles with energy while maintaining a stylish flow.

Tracks:
01 – The Sidewinder
02 – Totem Pole
03 – Gary’s Notebook
04 – Boy, What a Night
05 – Hocus-Pocus
06 – Totem Pole (alternate)

Personnel:
Lee Morgan – trumpet
Joe Henderson – tenor sax
Barry Harris – piano
Bob Cranshaw – bass
Billy Higgins – drums

Originally released in 1964 on Blue Note as BST-84157

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Jimmy Ponder – Something to Ponder {Muse}


Review by Anders Jonasson (amazon.com)

This is a beautiful album that Ponder dedicated to his 2 daughters. In one way it is typical Ponder album and in one way it is`nt,,the diffrence is the pianoplaying by Mark Soskin which is heart grabbing..he nearly steals the show on several occasions.
There are 4 songs that stands out in my opinion:
-Johnnys place…a straight a head 12 bar blues with that bounce that only Ponder is able to produce
-Since I fell for you….that old funky tune..which Ponder handles so nicely and even it is 12 minutes long it never get’s boring..this is the real highlight of the album
-The craetor has a master plan…wonderful playing by Ponder,,where he also sings in unison with his single string lines..very Bensonlike
-Moonlight in Vermont….the tune often linked with legendary guitarist Johnny Smith..played so relaxed and beautful.
Get it if you can…not easy though to find!!

Tracks:
01 – Johnny’s Place
02 – Since I Fell for You
03 – Satin Doll
04 – The Creator Has a Master Plan
05 – Moonlight in Vermont
06 – Softly As a Morning Sunrise
07 – Sunshine

Personnel:
Jimmy Ponder – guitar
Mark Soskin – piano
Peter Washington – bass
Roger Humphrey – drums

Recorded at M&I Recording Studio, New York, NY on March 9, 1994

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork

Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster {Verve} “Originals”


Review from cduniverse.com

“Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster” highlights the talents of both tenor men nicely, with Hawkins and Webster consistently complementing each other’s playing. In fact, they develop a kind of conversational interplay that is quite beautiful, particularly on the gentle “It Never Entered My Mind” and the slowly swinging “Shine on Harvest Moon.” Although the rest of the band consists of stellar musicians (including pianist Oscar Peterson and guitarist Herb Ellis), they concede the spotlight to Hawkins and Webster, whose dual saxophones more than carry the record. Other standout tracks include the sultry ballad “Tangerine” and the Latin-flavored “La Rosita.”

Tracks:
01 – Blues for Yolande (stereo)
02 – It Never Entered My Mind
03 – La Rosita
04 – You’d Be So Nice to Come Home To
05 – Prisoner of Love
06 – Tangerine
07 – Shine on Harvest Moon
08 – Blues for Yolande (mono)
09 – Blues for Yolande (incomplete takes)

Personnel:
Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster – tenor saxophone
Oscar Peterson – piano
Herb Ellis – guitar
Ray Brown – bass
Alvin Stoller – drums

Recorded October 1957 in Hollwyood

Quality: eac, flac, cue, log, artwork